Cost comparison SGR Kenya vs SGR Tanzania

Geza Ulole

Geza Ulole

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Geza Ulole

Geza Ulole

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Tanzania secures $7.6 billion financing deal from Chinese lender to build new railway

President John Magufuli with China Exim Bank president Liu Liang after holding talks at Chamwino State Lodge in Dodoma this week. PHOTO | COURTESY

In Summary

  • Dar es Salaam is positioning itself as a regional hub, upgrading its port to attract more business from its neighbouring landlocked countries.
  • The EAC railways master plan incorporates the standard gauge railway’s Northern and Central Corridors, which are both commercially viable for landlocked countries in the region as they give them strategic access to the ports of Mombasa and Dar es Salaam.
  • The Northern Corridor Integration Projects championed by Rwanda, Kenya and Uganda spearheaded the establishment of a railway link from Mombasa to Kigali.
  • In June 2013, a Northern Corridor Integration Projects Heads of State Summit held in Kampala put in place mechanisms for fast-tracking the development of the SGR.


Tanzania has secured a $7.6 billion loan from China’s Export-Import Bank (Exim) for the construction of a railway line that will link it with Burundi, Rwanda and Democratic Republic of Congo.

President John Magufuli secured the concessional loan after meeting with the Exim Bank’s president Liu Liang.

President Magufuli, while announcing the funding, alluded to a preferential deal without providing details.

Oil and gas discoveries have turned Tanzania into an exploration hotspot, but the country’s transport infrastructure has suffered from decades of under investment. The country is also positioning itself as a regional hub, upgrading its port to attract more business from its regional landlocked neighbours.

According to Mr Liu, China Exim Bank will offer Tanzania technical support.

READ: China Exim sets terms for financing Uganda’s SGR

ALSO READ: Rwanda looks to Tanzania for rail transport as Uganda falters on SGR

Last year, Tanzania announced that it had awarded rail contracts to a consortium of Chinese firms led by China Railway Materials (CRM), which included the standard gauge rail project.

The Exim Bank is also financing a $1.2 billion, 532km natural gas pipeline in Tanzania.

On Wednesday last week, Finance and Planning Minister Dr Philip Mpango after a meeting with Dr Alberic Kacou, African Development Bank vice-president for human resources and corporate services, announced that Tanzania had secured a further $200 million loan from the AfDB to finance transport infrastructure projects.

“We will use some of this funds towards the construction of the SGR project to transform the country’s infrastructure,” Dr Mpango said.

In an interview with Bloomberg, Gerson Msigwa, a spokesman for Tanzania’s presidency, said the construction will start by July next year. Before then, Tanzania and Exim Bank China will be expected to have finalise technical issues on the contract and sign the financing deal for the 2,190km project.

Tanzania Transport Minister Samuel Sitta said the SGR will have a main line that will connect the port city of Dar es Salaam to Rwanda and Burundi, with additional branch lines running within the country.

“We expect to have two offshoots: One of them to Mwanza, which will open up the lakeside port city and link it with Uganda, while the second one will link to the coal, iron ore and soda ash mining areas in the south. Through this, we expect an increase in cargo on this route,” Mr Sitta said, adding that will be at an additional cost of $6.6 billion.

Already, Tanzania has signed contracts with China Railway No 2 Engineering Group to build a rail link between the southern port of Mtwara, which is rich in coal, iron ore and natural gas. The contract will see China Railway No 2 Engineering Group provide 10 per cent of the funding with the rest provided by the government.

Kenya is also constructing a $3.27 billion 609km new standard gauge railway line between Mombasa and Nairobi to boost the movement of cargo from the port.

However, queries have been raised over the economic viability of SGR, after key landlocked states indicated their intention to connect to the Indian Ocean through Tanzania.


The issue of cost is also bound to arise now that Tanzania’s SGR is four times longer than Kenya’s but only two times as expensive.

In a previous interview with The EastAfrican, Kenya Railways managing director Atanas Maina said that the cost of the Kenyan SGR was high because of the design adopted, which will see the train maintain an average speed of 80 kilometres irrespective of the terrain.

“We have built bridges, and raised the track in areas where we would have had corners to achieve the average speed we expect the wagons to travel at. This has increased the costs immensely as compared with the neighbouring Ethiopia and Tanzania SGER designs that haven’t taken this into account,” Mr Maina said.

Recently, a confidential World Bank report cast doubt on the region’s push for the SGR projects, saying they would only be viable with increases in cargo of between 20 tonnes and 55 million tonnes per year.

The report done by the Africa transport unit at the World Bank titled The Economics of Rail Gauge in the East Africa Community showed that the volumes of the forecasts undertaken for the EAC railway master plan and central line in Tanzania, are unattainable over the medium to longer term.

“Based on these assumptions, there is no economic or financial case for standard gauge in the EAC area at this time. A refurbished meter gauge network would appear to be the most appropriate option in economic and financial terms, and could easily accommodate forecast traffic up to 2030, with lower investment requirements,” the report concludes.

The World Bank team highlighted the rehabilitation of the existing railway network as the best alternative, which would allow a phased approach to the regions development, consistent with current and projected demand and the financing envelope available.

The SGR alternative, which the regional governments chose, involves the construction of a standard gauge railway on a new right of way, an option the World Bank team said required additional investment in land acquisition and structures, and new right-of-way construction.

“This alternative predicates axle loads in the order of 25 tons per axles and a maximum operating speed of up to 120 km per hour. Again, based on these assumptions, the estimated maximum carrying capacity of the current network would exceed 60 million tonnes per year. The estimated investment cost per km will be $ 3.25 million,” the report said.

From the estimates provided, the Tanzanian new railway line will cost an average of $3.4 million per kilometre.

MY TAKE

It is time now to look at the cost of the two rails as we know cost of construction is very important for prospect of any infrastructure! i welcome bright minds to contribute and not some propaganda in here!


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Enyewe Mbongolala ni mtu mjinga Sana😂😂😂 wataka kumaanisha ukinunua electric car unarudi driving school??? You must be very stupid.
The most embarrassing thing is that Chinese are teaching you how to drive 1800 smoke belching diesel locos. How about that broda?

The Chinese are even reported to be paid more and are driving locos and run sgr at 1 billions a month instead of kenyans!!
 
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saocv

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The most embarrassing thing is that Chinese are teaching you how to drive 1800 smoke belching diesel locos. How about that broda?

The Chinese are even reported to be paid more and are driving locos and run sgr at 1 billions a month instead of kenyans!!
Let the chinese work East Africans have Failed
 
mwaswast

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mwaswast

mwaswast

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The most embarrassing thing is that Chinese are teaching you how to drive 1800 smoke belching diesel locos. How about that broda?

The Chinese are even reported to be paid more and are driving locos and run sgr at 1 billions a month instead of kenyans!!
The last time you and I checked Tz doesn't have a functioning SGR 3 years after construction began...Nasikia bado mko 48% of the 200km na bado hiyo 48% inatiliwa Shaka hata na Watanzania wengi.
 
tuusan

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tuusan

tuusan

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The last time you and I checked Tz doesn't have a functioning SGR 3 years after construction began...Nasikia bado mko 48% of the 200km na bado hiyo 48% inatiliwa Shaka hata na Watanzania wengi.
Endelea kusikia
 
Geza Ulole

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Geza Ulole

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Shocking details of mysterious owners of Kenya’s SGR firm

By DAILY NATION
IN SUMMARY

· The company, Africa Star Railway Operation Company Ltd, is majority-owned by CRBC, but the other shareholders remain a mystery with details unavailable at the Registrar of Companies.
· In the first six months of operation, the operator was to earn Sh13.3 billion for the passenger service trains, even as the service was being marketed and travellers yet to get familiar with it.
· The fixed service monthly payment is for running two pairs of passenger trains, one pair of cargo trains and another pair of empty container trains between Nairobi and Mombasa.

Kenya signed a secret agreement with the Chinese allowing a mystery company with unknown local shareholders to run the Standard Gauge Railway, documents seen by the Sunday Nation show.

Publicly, China Road and Bridge Corporation (CRBC), a State-owned Chinese company with Kenyan offices, will run the trains for 10 years, but a “special purpose operating company” was formed in May 2017 to run the operations.

PUNITIVE CLAUSE
The company, Africa Star Railway Operation Company Ltd, is majority-owned by CRBC, but the other shareholders remain a mystery with details unavailable at the Registrar of Companies in Nairobi.

And it’s a lucrative, lopsided deal for the operator. Last month, the operator sent Kenya Railways a fee note of Sh30 billion, which it claims are pending payments. Sh800 million out of it is made up of penalties for late payments, according to papers seen by the Sunday Nation.

The contract frees the operator of all liabilities and forces Kenya Railways to pay a fixed monthly service charge – which must be paid quarterly and in advance, the documents show.

Before the operations started, documents show, Kenya was compelled to lend the operator an interest free Sh3.5 billion, according to the documents. A special reserve account was also set up to be maintained with Sh3 billion to cushion the operator. The contract also put punitive clauses pushing Kenya to start operating the railway by June 1, 2017. Any delay in starting the line would attract a fine of Sh24.2 million a day, the contract shows.

In the first six months of operation, the operator was to earn Sh13.3 billion for the passenger service trains, even as the service was being marketed and travellers yet to get familiar with it. The fixed service monthly payment is for running two pairs of passenger trains, one pair of cargo trains and another pair of empty container trains between Nairobi and Mombasa. If more trains come into service, the cost goes up, the contract shows.

“KR (Kenya Railways) acknowledges that the Operator intends to create, no later than twelve (12) months after the execution date, a special purpose operating company incorporated under the laws of Kenya to act as the operator under this agreement,” says the contract.

While the Sunday Nation has seen the SGR operations and maintenance deal signed between CRBC and Kenya Railways Corporation (KRC), a separate document detailing the operations allowing Africa Star to take over the operations is said to have been taken away by lawyers.

SECRECY SECURE
Sources at the Transport ministry, who asked not to be named for fear of retribution, said the secret contract was signed at White Sands Hotel in Mombasa in the presence of a handful of officials hours before President Uhuru Kenyatta launched the Madaraka Express Mombasa-Nairobi train on May 31, 2017. KRC was represented by Mr Atanas Maina, who has since been suspended over corruption charges.

The contract stops KRC from publishing any information provided to it by the operator, and indicates that a copy has to be submitted to CRBC for approval — except in circumstances where such publication is required by law.

“KR and the operator shall keep confidential and shall not disclose to any third party any documents, data, or other information furnished directly by the other party hereto in connection with the Agreement or in connection with the business or commercial operations of the parties whether such information has been furnished prior to, during or following completion or termination of the agreement,” reads Clause 39 of the contract. The secrecy is legally bound to be kept even after the agreement expires.

The Sunday Nation contacted both Kenya Railways and the Transport ministry for responses to questions on the contract and to give officials a chance to explain what is essentially a complex document governing the most expensive infrastructure project in the country’s history.

Transport Cabinet Secretary James Macharia, contacted on Thursday, referred the Sunday Nation to the contracting parties – Kenyan Railways and the Chinese. KRC and CRBC were unresponsive despite several e-mail and phone reminders. Efforts to get a comment from the ministry and the two agencies will continue, after the publication of this report is fully explained in balanced way.

One of those lingering questions is why a new company was required to operate the SGR while the CRBC, which signed the deal, already has a local branch. Africa Star did not respond to our queries over its role and ownership even as records search yielded nothing.

CONTROL VARIES
The operations and maintenance contract is the latest secret SGR document to be revealed by the Sunday Nation following our expose on the Mombasa-Nairobi line loan agreement that, among other things, waived Kenya’s sovereignty over strategic assets upon failure to service the more than Sh400 billion debt.

A website associated with Africa Star, but which provides few details, indicated they are “mainly engaged in railway passenger transport and freight services”. Africa Star’s offices are at the Syokimau Railway Station and while the Sunday Nation did not access them, Kenya Railways sources claimed that all the firm’s staff are Chinese and access is restricted by tight security.

Another issue that officials will need to clear up is why the Chinese operator is freed of all liability as well as how the billions of shillings paid in management fees represent value for money.

The contract makes operations almost risk free for the operator. Even network expansion, additional services and change in law that affects the operator adds to the bill, according to the contract.

Although the fees is supposed to be “fixed”, certain factors which are beyond Kenya’s control can vary the cost. These include the price of lubricants and fuel, metal and equipment in China.

“The Fixed Services Payment, which shall … be payable notwithstanding the occurrence of any relief event, force majeure event or compensation event,” the contract says in Clause 26.5.1. Simply put, even if the SGR doesn’t operate, payments to the operator will remain.

The loading and offloading fees are also charged despite the Chinese operator having bought and installed dysfunctional cranes at the port of Mombasa.

All these are demanded even as the same contract limits the maximum number of trains to be run on the line. The line which generates far less than half its costs every month has gobbled about Sh1.8 billion every month in the 16 months it has operated even as its contentious revenues remain less than Sh6 billion in a year.

RIGGED SYSTEM
KRC, in a May 14, 2019 letter, protested the Sh30 billion bill sent by CRBC, disputing the amount charged on the use of VIP trains.

“The Operator has charged for two VIP trains in the 4th quarter. KRC is of the opinion that the two VIP trains operated as E2&E1 do not qualify for Variable Services Payment charges. Using VIP coaches on normal train operations does not necessarily translate to a VIP train service. We recommend that the operator withdraws the payment request and revise appropriately,” the corporation wrote.
Under the confidential contract, the operator has the right to manage the ticketing system and any associated software and hardware.

The operator also collects passenger fares, including non-cash revenues like M-Pesa.
Last November, the Sunday Nation revealed a ticketing scam where the Chinese railway operators were suspected to have rigged the system. There have been no reports on the investigation.

Another curious clause in the Sunday Nation analysis is that the operator can only foot repair bills of less that Sh100,000 in what has left KRC badly exposed to paying for maintenance fees that are expected to pile in the coming years. Expenses to maintain the line are also not supposed to go beyond Sh5 million per year.

Further, the operator cannot be held responsible for any legal claims from third parties involving damage to property, death, illness or personal injury.

“The operator (Africa Star) shall be relieved from all rights and obligations under this agreement. CRBC shall provide parent company guarantee of the obligations of the operating company under this Agreement,” it reads.

WAIVE SOVEREIGNTY
Furthermore, the operator was only required to give a performance bond of Sh600 million
KRC also signed to allow a smooth processing of work permits for Chinese nationals to work in the running of the train including accepting the Chinese professional qualification just like their Kenyan counterparts and facilitating ease of moving train parts for repair in China and importing train parts into the country without paying any tax.

The contract further empowers the Chinese operator with a “non-exclusive license to use, copy, modify any intellectual property KR has”.

Terminating the agreement is also made an equally costly affair with KRC required to pay for transport of equipment and staff back to China after clearing any outstanding obligations owed to the operator.

Also, just like the financing deal for SGR, Kenya agreed to waive any sovereignty or any immunity on KRC and its assets whenever there is a dispute.

In what appears like a major step though, the operation contract unlike the financing agreement, allows for arbitration of disputes to be made by a neutral party.

The language of arbitration is also set as English and the place for hearing the arbitration allowed to be in Nairobi.

With ongoing wearing of the used locomotives purchased in 2017 to run the line, increasing cost of operations and the limitation of the line capacity at 16 trains per day, SGR’s trip to profitability may be a steep slope based on the conditions of the operations contract.
 
Bantugbro

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Haya mambo yanaanza kuiva!

Shocking details of mysterious owners of Kenya’s SGR firm

By DAILY NATION
IN SUMMARY

· The company, Africa Star Railway Operation Company Ltd, is majority-owned by CRBC, but the other shareholders remain a mystery with details unavailable at the Registrar of Companies.
· In the first six months of operation, the operator was to earn Sh13.3 billion for the passenger service trains, even as the service was being marketed and travellers yet to get familiar with it.
· The fixed service monthly payment is for running two pairs of passenger trains, one pair of cargo trains and another pair of empty container trains between Nairobi and Mombasa.

Kenya signed a secret agreement with the Chinese allowing a mystery company with unknown local shareholders to run the Standard Gauge Railway, documents seen by the Sunday Nation show.

Publicly, China Road and Bridge Corporation (CRBC), a State-owned Chinese company with Kenyan offices, will run the trains for 10 years, but a “special purpose operating company” was formed in May 2017 to run the operations.

PUNITIVE CLAUSE
The company, Africa Star Railway Operation Company Ltd, is majority-owned by CRBC, but the other shareholders remain a mystery with details unavailable at the Registrar of Companies in Nairobi.

And it’s a lucrative, lopsided deal for the operator. Last month, the operator sent Kenya Railways a fee note of Sh30 billion, which it claims are pending payments. Sh800 million out of it is made up of penalties for late payments, according to papers seen by the Sunday Nation.

The contract frees the operator of all liabilities and forces Kenya Railways to pay a fixed monthly service charge – which must be paid quarterly and in advance, the documents show.

Before the operations started, documents show, Kenya was compelled to lend the operator an interest free Sh3.5 billion, according to the documents. A special reserve account was also set up to be maintained with Sh3 billion to cushion the operator. The contract also put punitive clauses pushing Kenya to start operating the railway by June 1, 2017. Any delay in starting the line would attract a fine of Sh24.2 million a day, the contract shows.

In the first six months of operation, the operator was to earn Sh13.3 billion for the passenger service trains, even as the service was being marketed and travellers yet to get familiar with it. The fixed service monthly payment is for running two pairs of passenger trains, one pair of cargo trains and another pair of empty container trains between Nairobi and Mombasa. If more trains come into service, the cost goes up, the contract shows.

“KR (Kenya Railways) acknowledges that the Operator intends to create, no later than twelve (12) months after the execution date, a special purpose operating company incorporated under the laws of Kenya to act as the operator under this agreement,” says the contract.

While the Sunday Nation has seen the SGR operations and maintenance deal signed between CRBC and Kenya Railways Corporation (KRC), a separate document detailing the operations allowing Africa Star to take over the operations is said to have been taken away by lawyers.

SECRECY SECURE
Sources at the Transport ministry, who asked not to be named for fear of retribution, said the secret contract was signed at White Sands Hotel in Mombasa in the presence of a handful of officials hours before President Uhuru Kenyatta launched the Madaraka Express Mombasa-Nairobi train on May 31, 2017. KRC was represented by Mr Atanas Maina, who has since been suspended over corruption charges.

The contract stops KRC from publishing any information provided to it by the operator, and indicates that a copy has to be submitted to CRBC for approval — except in circumstances where such publication is required by law.

“KR and the operator shall keep confidential and shall not disclose to any third party any documents, data, or other information furnished directly by the other party hereto in connection with the Agreement or in connection with the business or commercial operations of the parties whether such information has been furnished prior to, during or following completion or termination of the agreement,” reads Clause 39 of the contract. The secrecy is legally bound to be kept even after the agreement expires.

The Sunday Nation contacted both Kenya Railways and the Transport ministry for responses to questions on the contract and to give officials a chance to explain what is essentially a complex document governing the most expensive infrastructure project in the country’s history.

Transport Cabinet Secretary James Macharia, contacted on Thursday, referred the Sunday Nation to the contracting parties – Kenyan Railways and the Chinese. KRC and CRBC were unresponsive despite several e-mail and phone reminders. Efforts to get a comment from the ministry and the two agencies will continue, after the publication of this report is fully explained in balanced way.

One of those lingering questions is why a new company was required to operate the SGR while the CRBC, which signed the deal, already has a local branch. Africa Star did not respond to our queries over its role and ownership even as records search yielded nothing.

CONTROL VARIES
The operations and maintenance contract is the latest secret SGR document to be revealed by the Sunday Nation following our expose on the Mombasa-Nairobi line loan agreement that, among other things, waived Kenya’s sovereignty over strategic assets upon failure to service the more than Sh400 billion debt.

A website associated with Africa Star, but which provides few details, indicated they are “mainly engaged in railway passenger transport and freight services”. Africa Star’s offices are at the Syokimau Railway Station and while the Sunday Nation did not access them, Kenya Railways sources claimed that all the firm’s staff are Chinese and access is restricted by tight security.

Another issue that officials will need to clear up is why the Chinese operator is freed of all liability as well as how the billions of shillings paid in management fees represent value for money.

The contract makes operations almost risk free for the operator. Even network expansion, additional services and change in law that affects the operator adds to the bill, according to the contract.

Although the fees is supposed to be “fixed”, certain factors which are beyond Kenya’s control can vary the cost. These include the price of lubricants and fuel, metal and equipment in China.

“The Fixed Services Payment, which shall … be payable notwithstanding the occurrence of any relief event, force majeure event or compensation event,” the contract says in Clause 26.5.1. Simply put, even if the SGR doesn’t operate, payments to the operator will remain.

The loading and offloading fees are also charged despite the Chinese operator having bought and installed dysfunctional cranes at the port of Mombasa.

All these are demanded even as the same contract limits the maximum number of trains to be run on the line. The line which generates far less than half its costs every month has gobbled about Sh1.8 billion every month in the 16 months it has operated even as its contentious revenues remain less than Sh6 billion in a year.

RIGGED SYSTEM
KRC, in a May 14, 2019 letter, protested the Sh30 billion bill sent by CRBC, disputing the amount charged on the use of VIP trains.

“The Operator has charged for two VIP trains in the 4th quarter. KRC is of the opinion that the two VIP trains operated as E2&E1 do not qualify for Variable Services Payment charges. Using VIP coaches on normal train operations does not necessarily translate to a VIP train service. We recommend that the operator withdraws the payment request and revise appropriately,” the corporation wrote.
Under the confidential contract, the operator has the right to manage the ticketing system and any associated software and hardware.

The operator also collects passenger fares, including non-cash revenues like M-Pesa.
Last November, the Sunday Nation revealed a ticketing scam where the Chinese railway operators were suspected to have rigged the system. There have been no reports on the investigation.

Another curious clause in the Sunday Nation analysis is that the operator can only foot repair bills of less that Sh100,000 in what has left KRC badly exposed to paying for maintenance fees that are expected to pile in the coming years. Expenses to maintain the line are also not supposed to go beyond Sh5 million per year.

Further, the operator cannot be held responsible for any legal claims from third parties involving damage to property, death, illness or personal injury.


Haya mambo yanaanza kuiva....

“The operator (Africa Star) shall be relieved from all rights and obligations under this agreement. CRBC shall provide parent company guarantee of the obligations of the operating company under this Agreement,” it reads.

WAIVE SOVEREIGNTY
Furthermore, the operator was only required to give a performance bond of Sh600 million
KRC also signed to allow a smooth processing of work permits for Chinese nationals to work in the running of the train including accepting the Chinese professional qualification just like their Kenyan counterparts and facilitating ease of moving train parts for repair in China and importing train parts into the country without paying any tax.

The contract further empowers the Chinese operator with a “non-exclusive license to use, copy, modify any intellectual property KR has”.

Terminating the agreement is also made an equally costly affair with KRC required to pay for transport of equipment and staff back to China after clearing any outstanding obligations owed to the operator.

Also, just like the financing deal for SGR, Kenya agreed to waive any sovereignty or any immunity on KRC and its assets whenever there is a dispute.

In what appears like a major step though, the operation contract unlike the financing agreement, allows for arbitration of disputes to be made by a neutral party.

The language of arbitration is also set as English and the place for hearing the arbitration allowed to be in Nairobi.

With ongoing wearing of the used locomotives purchased in 2017 to run the line, increasing cost of operations and the limitation of the line capacity at 16 trains per day, SGR’s trip to profitability may be a steep slope based on the conditions of the operations contract.
 

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