Archives:Kenyan History!

Sinister

Sinister

JF-Expert Member
Joined
Feb 18, 2013
Messages
537
Points
500
Sinister

Sinister

JF-Expert Member
Joined Feb 18, 2013
537 500
fb_img_1562139520638-jpg.1145227
Kenyan History as told, one picture and story at a time. Kindly uphold respect, decorum... Welcome to the cyber museum of Kenya'
 
pingli-nywee

pingli-nywee

JF-Expert Member
Joined
Sep 16, 2015
Messages
8,288
Points
2,000
pingli-nywee

pingli-nywee

JF-Expert Member
Joined Sep 16, 2015
8,288 2,000
One of the most iconic image of Kenya's history. An image of Kenya's most illustrious son, the freedom fighter and the leader of the Mau Mau, Field Marshall Dedan Kimathi Waciuri. It was snapped with a small Kodak camera, by his agemate and 'ngarana'(namesake) Mzee Tiras Kimathi Murage, on the morning of 21st October 1956 in Kahigaini, Tetu, Nyeri County. This was the day that the colonial forces finally captured the elusive Field Marshall.
 
Sinister

Sinister

JF-Expert Member
Joined
Feb 18, 2013
Messages
537
Points
500
Sinister

Sinister

JF-Expert Member
Joined Feb 18, 2013
537 500
One of the most iconic image of Kenya's history. An image of Kenya's most illustrious son, a freedom fighter and leader of the Mau Mau, Field Marshall Dedan Kimathi Waciuri. Taken with a Kodak camera by his agemate and namesake Tirus Kimathi Murage, on 21st October 1956 in Kahigaini, Tetu Nyeri County.
Is it true that his body is buried somewhere in Kamiti Maximum Prison?
 
Sinister

Sinister

JF-Expert Member
Joined
Feb 18, 2013
Messages
537
Points
500
Sinister

Sinister

JF-Expert Member
Joined Feb 18, 2013
537 500
fb_img_1562141261639-jpg.1145251
‪1954: A ferry crosses the channel at Likoni.‬
 
Sinister

Sinister

JF-Expert Member
Joined
Feb 18, 2013
Messages
537
Points
500
Sinister

Sinister

JF-Expert Member
Joined Feb 18, 2013
537 500
In October of 1931, Philip Cunliffe-Lister, the British Secretary of State for the Colonies, commissioned the services of Sir William Morris Carter, Captain Frank O‘Brien Wilson, and Mr. Rupert William Hemsted to investigate African land claims, and to listen to grievances “produced by the insecurity of African landholding”.

This Commission, chaired by Sir Carter, came to be known as the Carter Commission.

Born in 1878, the Oxford-educated Carter had held judicial posts in the High Court of the Uganda Protectorate and the Court of Appeal for East Africa. In 1920, he had served as both the Chief Justice and Acting Governor of Uganda.

From the Committee hearings, we learn a great deal on the history of Kenya as pertains land matters. For example, although the Devonshire White Paper of 1923 held that whenever the interest of the native african clashed with those of European, Asian or Arab settlers, those of the African prevailed, this rule was largely practiced, well, only on paper.

Some Europeans petitioned the Carter Commission to allow Indians to own land. To give the reader a glimpse of some of the land grievances that were in place in those years, I have selected a few - one from a white settler and another from local Luo/Kavirondo elders.

To start us off, the memorandum below is that of the former, who could not make representations in person.

Excerpts:

“It is with very real regret that I have to inform you that, owing to the state of the road from this farm to Kisumu, I shall not be able to appear before your Commission on September 8th.

May I be allowed to again state briefly my views, and to inform you that if you are taking evidence at Kora either this week or next, that I should be grateful for another opportunity to appear before you.

In my humble opinion, Indians should be allowed to buy land anywhere between Koru and Kisumu, with the exception of the highlands above Songhur Township.

There is no doubt in my own mind that this area will never be fully developed until we allow Indians to develop it. I have held land in this district for the last eleven years, and have farmed it all these years, and I am now engaged in interesting more British capital with a view to erecting a sugar mill. This is a very fertile part, and, like my neighbours, I would like to see the whole country settled with Britishers, but although I have, during the last twelve years, persuaded fourteen new British settlers to come to this country, I have never suggested the Chemelil-Koru area as an ideal place for white settlement.

May I here state that I have lost two partners who died from blackwater fever.

There are plenty of healthy places up-country for white settlement, and Government would be, in my opinion, well advised to encourage new white settlers to keep to these healthy districts, for an unhealthy white population is not an asset to any country.

Although I have to spend a large proportion of my time at Chemelil, I am forced by the health conditions to keep my wife and family of three at my farm in Subukia.

Kenya's biggest need is increased production, and I, personally, should welcome any man to Kenya who is capable of producing something, no matter of what race or colour, providing always that he were a law-abiding citizen.

Indians are certainly that.

Some years ago, a petition was signed by all the settlers of Lower Chemelil asking Government for permission to sell land to Indians, with one exception - Mr. X. It is interesting to note that Mr. X has now subdivided his farm, and sold three portions to Indians, and I maintain that there are many like Mr. X today.

Some of my friends say that Indians do not work their farms. This is true in certain cases. But it is equally true in the case of some whites. I have neighbours who do not produce more than 500 bags of mealies a year, both here and in Subukia.

But it is no secret to any of us here when I say that Mr. Maghanbai Patel will harvest from 5,000 to 6,000 bags of mealies this year. If Government would erect a sugar factory, capable of taking all cane produced, this area would all be put under cane by Indians, and the district would be the
biggest revenue producing district in the Colony.

May I suggest that Indians should be given a chance to develop this part. That much is due to them. We can always take the land back if they do not take advantage of their opportunities.

South Africa has a sugar industry worth £4,000,000 a year. Our land and rainfall are superior. So why should we not do all we can to encourage one here?

My friends in Upper Songhor say that I am mad to live here; they would not live here if I gave them the land, and yet they do not want to see Indians here. It is indeed difficult to understand their attitude.”

Signed,

Mr. R. O. Ney
Chemelil, 6th September 1932.

[End of memorandum]

In case anyone is wondering, Chemelil Sugar Factory came into being after independence, in 1965.

In 1932, a group of Luo elders also petitioned the Carter Commission as follows:

We the Jaluo Elders of the Kisumu location humbly beg to address His Majesty’s Land Commission concerning our grievances, which are not a few, because our land, which we have inherited from our fathers, is continually being taken from us.

We also wish to express our thanksgiving that our complaints have been heard, and that His Majesty's Government has appointed a Commission to consider our claims.

(1) We would call attention to a grievance of long standing which dates back to the time of Chief Obiro, before Europeans came to our land. Our fathers took possession of the land now under dispute, and drove the Maragoli (Bantu) into their own country and established a boundary line at the top of the Maragoli Hills. After a time, the Bantu returned to our territory, and were ordered out
again by the Government in 1907.

Returning again, they were sent back a second time by Government orders about the year 1915. Notwithstanding all that has been done to keep these intruders in their own location, they are, at present, in possession of some of our land.

They number 242 people. They refuse to attend our barazaa when called; they have beaten our women and children; and they have stolen our goods and threatened our lives. They assaulted our late beloved chief, Johann Ouko, whose timely intervention prevented some of our people from attempting to settle the dispute with spears and clubs. We humbly beseech you to remove these enemies from our land. This, we believe to be the only solution to our problem so that we may again dwell in peace.

(2) Our next grievance over land tenure dated back to about 1907 when about 462 acres of our land was given to the B.E.A. Corporation. At this time, some 500 of our people were obliged to give up their homes without compensation.

We not only lost our land and homes but the graves of our ancestors were left in the hands of strangers. This injustice still rankles in our hearts, as many of those who were driven off are still without land and have been compelled to make temporary homes elsewhere.

(3) Another piece of our land was taken about the same time at the Kisian River and possessed by an Indian. This is only a small portion of about three acres, but valuable to us, nevertheless.

(4) Later, a section of our land near Nyag’ore border was given to Swahilis, who still reside there.

(5) Again, about two acres of our land was allotted to Doctor Harloff, at German Point. Although the Doctor does not reside there, we are deprived of the use of this land.

(6) We are also deprived of a considerable area of valuable grazing land which the Europeans of Kisumu have appropriated for a golf course. Some of our people have been prosecuted for trespass when their cattle or goats were found grazing on this portion of land.

(7) We would respectfully call attention to a portion of land at Ojolo. About 1906, nearly 100 acres of land was given as a Mission Station site to the Roman Catholic Mission who, finding that it was unsuitable for European occupation, vacated it. We made use of the land building huts and cultivating the soil. After a period of ten or twelve years, we were removed by Government.

The Mission has a sector school at present on the site, to which we have no objection.

As the land in question is no longer occupied by the Mission, we are grieved at being turned off after being allowed to reside there for so many years.

(8) Government has appropriated a certain portion of our land for an aerodrome; for a branch railway which runs through our reserve; and for roads which have been built for the use of other vehicles. To this we have no objection.

Our reserve is already too small for our growing population and herds. We sincerely hope His Majesty's Commission will consider our petition and restore our land and establish our boundaries as our fathers left them to us.

We are loyal subjects to His Majesty, King George, and are grateful for what the Government is doing for our people. We gave ourselves, even unto death, in defence of the Empire during the Great War, and in the event of another war, or any other needy service, we pledge our faithful allegiance.

We, the undersigned Elders of Kisumu location, are witness to the above memorandum.

Chief Nikodemo Okore
Assistant Chief Ezekiel Kasuku
Ex-chief Oliech Obiro.
Olang Ogada
Obala Omoke
Osir Opiya
Osimbo Ong’odi
Ombuya Omedo
Ojuong Bodo

Taken down on behalf of the above-mentioned Elders

- H. W. Iunis.

[End of memorandum]
fb_img_1562141516820-jpg.1145253
fb_img_1562141511767-jpg.1145254
fb_img_1562139497601-jpg.1145255
 
Sinister

Sinister

JF-Expert Member
Joined
Feb 18, 2013
Messages
537
Points
500
Sinister

Sinister

JF-Expert Member
Joined Feb 18, 2013
537 500
fb_img_1562141744375-jpg.1145257
The two men standing in front are Sir Ali bin Salim (L) and pioneer colonial administrator John Ainsworth.‬

The photo was taken in the 1920s.

‪Besides being an administrator, Ainsworth is among those who oversaw the establishment of Nairobi and was indeed one of its major land owners. He had large tracts of land around the area near present-day Nairobi National Museum (until the early 90s there was a popular club in that area called Ainsworth aka Boomerang, which was named after the man).‬

‪On his part, Sir Ali bin Salim was the Liwali (Governor) of Mombasa. Knighted by the British in 1929, ten years after he had been nominated to Kenya’s Legislative Council as the Arab representative, he took over the Governorship from his father, Salim bin Khalfan.‬

‪Sir Ali was keen to develop modern education in Mombasa. He oversaw the establishment of schools for locals at the coast. He had seen education as key to the development of his subjects. Indeed, he had sent one of his own sons to England for studies.‬

‪However, the schools he founded in Mombasa taught Islamic studies and this was a major disadvantage to its students later on as they could neither speak nor write in English.‬

Some also saw him as the sellout who gave away natives’ land and property in Mombasa to the colonial government.‬

‪Moreover, it was Sir Ali - seen in the second pic (seated) in earlier years as the Liwali of Mambrui - who was used by the British to press locals to accept that slave trade at the coast was no more.‬

‪The locals were confused.‬

‪First of all, the British had proclaimed slaves - the so-called WaFrere, as free. Secondly, in exchange for the slaves’ freedom, the Europeans had compensated former Arab slave owners with money. Finally, some freed WaFrere were hired by European masters as labourers.‬

‪Were the British now not slave owners, having “bought” the slaves from their previous masters, Arabs demanded to know from their Liwali.‬

‪One can learn more about post-1900 Mombasa, and about Sir Ali, after whom Sir Ali Muslim Sports Club is named, from the book, Sir Ali bin Salim And The Making of Mombasa, by Judy Aldrick.‬

‪Sir Ali retired from administrative duties in 1931.‬
fb_img_1562141751537-jpg.1145258
fb_img_1562141748337-jpg.1145259
 
Sinister

Sinister

JF-Expert Member
Joined
Feb 18, 2013
Messages
537
Points
500
Sinister

Sinister

JF-Expert Member
Joined Feb 18, 2013
537 500
fb_img_1562143083070-jpg.1145270
At 0852Hrs on 15th Nov. 1971, the Small Scientific Satellite (SSS), was successfully launched at the San Marco launch platform in Kilifi’s Indian Ocean waters.

Launch of the satellite, pictured here, was a collaboration between NASA and the Italian Centre for Aerospace Researc
fb_img_1562143083070-jpg.1145270
h.
 
vulcan

vulcan

JF-Expert Member
Joined
Apr 2, 2012
Messages
801
Points
1,000
vulcan

vulcan

JF-Expert Member
Joined Apr 2, 2012
801 1,000
One of the most iconic image of Kenya's history. An image of Kenya's most illustrious son, the freedom fighter and the leader of the Mau Mau, Field Marshall Dedan Kimathi Waciuri. It was snapped with a small Kodak camera, by his agemate and 'ngarana'(namesake) Mzee Tiras Kimathi Murage, on the morning of 21st October 1956 in Kahigaini, Tetu, Nyeri County. This was the day that the colonial forces finally captured the elusive Field Marshall.
His name will never be forgotten. Field Marshall lala salama. You paid for the struggle with your life.
 
Sinister

Sinister

JF-Expert Member
Joined
Feb 18, 2013
Messages
537
Points
500
Sinister

Sinister

JF-Expert Member
Joined Feb 18, 2013
537 500
fb_img_1562175070104-jpg.1145696
This is a stamp, issued by the now defunct Kenya Posts and Telecommunications Corporation, to commemorate #HarambeeStars campaign in the 1986 World Cup qualifiers.

During the qualifying games, Kenya won at home soil against Ethiopia 2-1, and managed a 3-3 draw on the return leg in Addis. The five goals were scored by legendary striker Joe Masiga (2), Sammy Taabu, Ambrose Ayoyi and Sammy Onyango.

Kenya later got eliminated following an aggregate loss against Nigeria. Nigeria beat Kenya at then brand new Nyayo Stadium 3-0, and went on to lose 3-1 in Lagos. Joe Masiga was the scorer in Lagos.

The Harambee Stars squad included goalkeeper Mahmoud Abbas, standing extreme right in the stamp photo.
 
KENPAULITE

KENPAULITE

JF-Expert Member
Joined
Apr 6, 2017
Messages
1,288
Points
2,000
KENPAULITE

KENPAULITE

JF-Expert Member
Joined Apr 6, 2017
1,288 2,000
Kahigaini is my fathers area, actually the caves that they used to hide in are jus close by not far from bradegate
 
KENPAULITE

KENPAULITE

JF-Expert Member
Joined
Apr 6, 2017
Messages
1,288
Points
2,000
KENPAULITE

KENPAULITE

JF-Expert Member
Joined Apr 6, 2017
1,288 2,000
yeah, but like 4km back
 
Nemo Judex

Nemo Judex

JF-Expert Member
Joined
Jul 14, 2014
Messages
2,681
Points
2,000
Nemo Judex

Nemo Judex

JF-Expert Member
Joined Jul 14, 2014
2,681 2,000
Naona majasusi wa Kenya mnawai kuleta picha hizi, kabla ya katiba mpya.hamkuwahi kufanya hizi show of, huyo Kimathi mbona hamkumuenzi baada ya serikali huru, naamini hata anayosema Mzee Said yana mantiki sana, naona historia inaachiwa, tunataka freedom of information act katika mataifa ya Africa Mashariki tujue yote
 
pingli-nywee

pingli-nywee

JF-Expert Member
Joined
Sep 16, 2015
Messages
8,288
Points
2,000
pingli-nywee

pingli-nywee

JF-Expert Member
Joined Sep 16, 2015
8,288 2,000
Mzee Jomo Kenyatta with Emillio Mwai Wa Kibaki and Tom Mboya jumping in joy after KANU won the general elections. Soon after Kenya gained its independence in 1963.
 
pingli-nywee

pingli-nywee

JF-Expert Member
Joined
Sep 16, 2015
Messages
8,288
Points
2,000
pingli-nywee

pingli-nywee

JF-Expert Member
Joined Sep 16, 2015
8,288 2,000
Is it true that his body is buried somewhere in Kamiti Maximum Prison?
Yes its true. Last time I heard that there were new developments in regards to where exactly in Kamiti was his body buried. After the British lost a case filed in a British court against them by the Mau Mau. Secret files pertaining to the colonial era and the British gulag in Kenya came to light. Together with the details of what happened to the field marshall after his famous sham of a trial in Nyeri.
 
J

Janerose mzalendo

JF-Expert Member
Joined
Oct 4, 2018
Messages
3,277
Points
2,000
J

Janerose mzalendo

JF-Expert Member
Joined Oct 4, 2018
3,277 2,000
Naona majasusi wa Kenya mnawai kuleta picha hizi, kabla ya katiba mpya.hamkuwahi kufanya hizi show of, huyo Kimathi mbona hamkumuenzi baada ya serikali huru, naamini hata anayosema Mzee Said yana mantiki sana, naona historia inaachiwa, tunataka freedom of information act katika mataifa ya Africa Mashariki tujue yote
Kweli ni show off
Hata kinjeketile ngwale ataonyeshwa tu
 

Forum statistics

Threads 1,316,455
Members 505,652
Posts 31,890,972
Top