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lumanyisa

lumanyisa

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lumanyisa

lumanyisa

JF-Expert Member
Joined Oct 2, 2012
878 12 35
Stevie Wonder's late mother Lula
Hardaway was an incredible and
remarkable woman who raised a
house full of children. In her
biography, she's brutally honest
and reveals the sacrifices she made
as a young mother, as follows:
According to authors Dennis Love &
Stacy Brown: Lula Hardaway, her
husband (Judkins) and their sons
(including Stevie) were getting low
on food and coal.
One evening, her husband, who
was drunk, told her, "I want you to
go take a ride with a man, he gave
me some money, he's waiting in his
car on the street. Be nice to him."
Lula asked, "Be nice to him...what
do you mean? Judkins said, "You
just do whatever he wants you to
do!"
Lula screamed, "Are you crazy
drunk-Judkins grabbed her arm and
wrenched it, hard. Lula feared it
might snap in two. He had her
pinned up against the wall and spit
the following words in her ear:
"You go out there and do what he
says or I'll beat you like you never
been beat. You know I will!"
He shoved her roughly away from
the wall. "Get your coat and get
out of here!"
In a daze, Lula collected her
overcoat and shrugged it on. One
of her son's appeared in the
kitchen doorway: Where you going,
Mama? I'm hungry.
"I'll be back in a little while, she
heard herself say. You stay here.
Mama will be back in a bit."
She walked down the stairs where
the sedan was idled by the curb.
She opened the door and got in.
Afterwards, when it was over, she
returned home and walked up the
stairs shell shocked.
Later that evening, she went to the
corner market and bought a
chicken for dinner because, by
God, her children were going to
have food in their stomachs that
night and they were going to be
warm. She would see to it.
Other times, she refused to go out
on "the stroll" but she would
always be under the threat of
Judkin's insistence. She was under
his sway and she hated it, resented
it, felt revolted by it. But she was
convinced that this was the only
way, for now, until he got back on
his feet, until he figured things out.
Sometimes, Judkins would bring
home men for her. Other times,
she was on her own and she would
walk to the stroll, now she
understood why some of the girls
took dope but she never did.
Lula witnessed girls fight each
other for a trick. A fight to the
death, hair flying, fingers clawing at
eyes with the other girls watching
and laughing and whooping.
Lula hung back. She was still
young, pretty, healthy-looking.
Getting work was never a problem.
She kept to herself. Once, early on,
a large man, rough trade for sure,
came toward her, drifting down the
street like a shark. Stuck his face in
hers. This is my street, he said. And
I don't know you, and so, bitch,
why you here?
Lula stood her ground. I'm here,
she said, her voice wavering
slightly, because my children are
hungry and I want some coal in the
stove tonight when I go home..so
why don't you just tell me where
your street ends? And I'll make
sure I stay off it.
Source: "Blind Faith," by Dennis
Love & Stacy Brown
 

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