Avoid these 20 English words when in other countries

Kozo Okamoto

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Kozo Okamoto

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France

Preservative. Avoid asking about preservatives in France; you'll probably be met with strange looks. It means ‘condom' in France.

Norway

Pick. If you're visiting Norway, don't use the word ‘pick'. Your Norwegian colleague is unlikely to be impressed - it means ‘dick' over there.

Fitter. Does your business specialise in fitness products? Be mindful that in Norway, the word ‘fitte' refers to a woman's genitals.

Turkey

Peach. Going to Turkey? Avoid asking for a peach in the supermarket or anywhere else for that matter. It means ‘bastard' in Turkish.

Germany

Gift. ‘Never look a gift horse in the mouth', we're told; perhaps more so in Germany where the word means ‘poison'.

Latte. In Germany, latte doesn't mean the frothy, milky concoction you get from your local Starbucks. It means ‘erect penis' in some German quarters.

Korea

Salsa. Out for a Mexican in Korea? It's probably best not to ask for salsa: it means ‘diarrhoea' in Korean.

Sweden

Speed. Try not to talk about speed when in the company of others in Sweden. It means ‘fart'.

Bump. If you've had the misfortune of a bump on your car, note that the word ‘bump' in Swedish means ‘dump'.

Speed bump. Put the above two words together and you have the phrase ‘speed bump', which in Swedish means fart dump.

Kiss. If you ask your Swedish host or hostess for a kiss, they might very well direct you to the toilets. In Swedish, the word means ‘pee'.

Portugal

Pay Day. If you're in Portugal, refrain from singing with happiness that it's ‘pay day'. No one will be impressed. In Portuguese it means "I farted".

Exquisite. Extend a compliment to your Portuguese host by describing something belonging to them as ‘exquisite' and you might be met with askance looks: ‘esquisito' in Portuguese means ‘weird'.

Hungary

Cookie. If you're visiting Hungary, whether on business or for pleasure, avoid asking for a cookie. It means ‘small penis' in Hungarian.

Japan

Jerry. It's perhaps a little late for Ben & Jerry's ice cream, but if you're in Japan, avoid using the word – it means ‘diarrhoea' over there.

France

Bra. Do you sell luxury underwear? Whilst you and I might initially understand the word to mean a garment that covers the breasts, if you're in France your French colleagues might think you're selling arms. Literally.

Italy

Tremendous. Refrain from boasting about the tremendous prices you offer your clients. In this country, ‘tremendo' is the word for ‘terrible'.

Netherlands

Bill. Asking for the bill might raise a few guffaws in the Netherlands: ‘bil' means ‘buttocks' there.

Lager. It might confuse your Dutch colleagues if you were to ask for a ‘lager' when having a few drinks with them after work. Lager means ‘storage' in Dutch.

Spain

Cool. The word cool is too close for comfort to the Spanish word 'culo'; a crude term for 'bum'. Best avoided.
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Mentor

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Mentor

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Thanks!

But i bet wenyewe wanajua hilo so unless unaenda kwa wale wa ndani ndani ambao hawajakutana na English speakers frequently nadhani uko safe kuyatumia tu!
 

Nyaru-sare

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Nyaru-sare

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In East African countries and Great Lakes avoid using the word

TOMBAZANI. zulu. Means do me!

MAFI Sotho Means a watery faeces! Dare not even iota!
 
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