The top 25 richest Countries in the World

Mr What

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Oct 22, 2016
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The richest countries in the world take pride in their wealth of resources and policies that have enabled them to be at the top of the world. These countries have strong and diverse economies that shield them from collapse and low standards of living. These rich countries are very attractive to migrants and offer great opportunities for their residents.

The richest countries export high-value goods and services from biotechnology, air space equipment, and pharmaceuticals, which have a high return on investment. In this article, we will look at the 25 richest countries in the world by nominal GDP, which is one of the methods of measuring a country’s wealth.

25 richest countries in the world
Here is a list of the richest countries in the world in descending order.

1. United States.

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America is also one of the richest countries in the world, with a GDP of 17.7 trillion dollars and a population of 325 million people with a life expectancy of 78 years. It has a diverse economy comprising of technology, pharmaceuticals, and food products. The country is also home to the richest man in the world.

2. China

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China’s GDP is 14.14 trillion dollars. Over the years, the country has registered the growth of its economy owing to its manufacturing capability, technology, and export base. It is slightly close to its big rival, the USA, and it is projected that it could soon surpass America in 2023.

3. Japan

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Japan is a wealthy nation with a GDP of 5.15 trillion dollars. It has the third-largest economy in the world and a significant export base as well as a robust manufacturing industry.

4. Germany.

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Germany has one of the largest economies in the world. It has a GDP of 3.8 trillion dollars. There are 82.7 million people with a life expectancy of 81 years. It is also the third-largest exporter of goods after the USA and China. Its biggest export is cars, which account for 12% of all German exports. The industry manufactures BMW’s Audi and Volkswagen. The nation boasts of having one of the best F1 drivers in the world.

5. India

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This Asian nation has a GDP of 2.94 trillion dollars. India has a population of one billion people, which decreases its GDP per capita. There is still a large number of people who live in poverty. That said, the country gets its wealth from manufacturing industries and a reliable service sector.

6. United Kingdom

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The country has a GDP of 2.83 trillion dollars. Its economy is driven by a strong services sector, manufacturing, and agriculture.

7. France


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France has a GDP of 2.6 trillion. Its population includes 67 million people with a life expectancy of 82 years. It is a wealthy country owing to exports worth 500 billion dollars. Exports include automobiles, aerospace equipment, and wine.

8. Italy

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This European nation has a GDP of 1.99 trillion dollars. Its economy is driven by a big export base and business investments locally and internationally.

9. Brazil

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The largest country in South America has a GDP of 1.85 trillion dollars. Brazil is endowed with natural resources like tin, iron ore, and other minerals, which have helped drive the economy upwards.

10. Canada

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The country has a GDP of 1.73 trillion dollars and a population of 36.7 million people with a life expectancy of 82 years. It is a large exporter of crude oil behind Saudi Arabia and Iraq. The oil accounts for a large percentage of the country’s total export value.

11. Russia

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The country has a GDP of 1.64 trillion dollars. In the 1990s, its economy witnessed a commodity boom from the industrial and agricultural sectors. Other than that, the country has also made wealth through oil. The country has also garnered acclaim for being among the first to produce a Covid 19 vaccine.

12. South Korea

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This Asian giant has a GDP of 1.63 trillion dollars. It is known for its robust technology with the manufacture of Samsung and Hyundai. Its economy is driven by trade and industrialization.

13. Spain

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With a GDP of 1.4 trillion dollars, Spain boasts of a large service sector as it receives many tourists, agriculture with exports like olive oil and wine, pharmaceuticals, and machinery.

14. Australia

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Australia has a GDP of 1.38 trillion dollars and a population of 24.6 million people with a life expectancy of 82 years. The country produces a lot of iron and is the world’s largest producer of the minerals. Iron is highly consumed in the world market and offers great investment returns, thus making Australia a rich country.

15. Mexico

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The South American nation has a GDP of 1.22 trillion dollars. The economy here is driven by oil exports, electronics, automotive, tourism, and financial services.

16. Indonesia

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With a GDP of 1.11 trillion dollars, this Asian country has managed to be among the top 25 wealthiest countries. The economy here is driven by agriculture and a strong industrial sector.

17. Netherlands

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This is a wealthy European country with a GDP of 835.8 billion dollars with a population of 17.1 million and a life expectancy of 81 years. Its main exports include horticulture and medical technologies.

18. Saudi Arabia

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This is one of the richest countries in the Arab world, owing to oil resources. It has a GDP of 779.2 billion, with a population of 32.9 million, and a life expectancy of 74 years. It is the largest exporter of crude oil in the world. This country is a monarchy.

19. Turkey

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With a GDP of 743.7 billion dollars, this middle eastern nation has managed to call itself wealthy owing to big industries and services.

20. Switzerland

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Switzerland has a GDP of 715.3 billion dollars and a population of 8.5 people with a life expectancy of 83 years. Its source of wealth is gold, which holds the largest share of its exports. The country’s economic backbone is innovation as it invests a large amount of GDP on research and development.

21. United Arab Emirates

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This country has a GDP of 632.6 billion dollars, with a population of 9.4 million people and a life expectancy of 77 years. UAE gets its wealth from exports of crude oil, gas, gold, and diamonds, making it one of the top richest countries in the world. It has one of the lowest unemployment rates in the world.

22. Sweden

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This country has a GDP of 528.9 billion dollars, a population of 10.1 million, and a life expectancy of 82 years. Its most considerable investment is education. As a result, the country has the highest primary school enrollment, and its residents are well educated.

23. Belgium

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Belgium has a GDP of 517 billion dollars and a population of 11.4 million people. The life expectancy here is 81 years, an indication of high standards of living. It is a big exporter of goods, which account for more than 85% of its GDP. Its wealth is gained from medicine, petroleum, diamonds, and cars.

24. Singapore

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This Asian nation connects mainland Asia to the rest of the world. It has a GDP of 340 billion dollars, with a population of 5.6 million people and a life expectancy of 82 years. The country is the largest seller of microchips and other technologies, which make up 36% of its exports. Singapore is open to much of the world, given it has visa-free accessibility.

25. Qatar

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Qatar is one of the richest countries globally. It is located in the Middle East, in the Arabian Peninsula. It has a GDP of 183 billion dollars, making it the richest country in the world. It has a total population of 2.6 million people living up to 78 years. Qatar gets its wealth from oil reserves that are the backbone of its economy.
 

hearly

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Naona uingereza wametupwa mbali kabisa .. Lakini cha ajabu ni kwamba taiga lao bado lina ushawishi mkubwa sana katika siasa za Medani ya kimataifa "
 

Masamila07

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Africa kwenye umasikini hatupo peke yetu kuna vinchi bara la asia hatuchekani

All in all as a sum up Utajiri unareflect akili(Europeans,Wazungu) na bahati(nchi zilizopata Mafuta mapema)
 

Jay One

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The richest countries in the world take pride in their wealth of resources and policies that have enabled them to be at the top of the world. These countries have strong and diverse economies that shield them from collapse and low standards of living. These rich countries are very attractive to migrants and offer great opportunities for their residents.

The richest countries export high-value goods and services from biotechnology, air space equipment, and pharmaceuticals, which have a high return on investment. In this article, we will look at the 25 richest countries in the world by nominal GDP, which is one of the methods of measuring a country’s wealth.

25 richest countries in the world
Here is a list of the richest countries in the world in descending order.

1. United States.
America is also one of the richest countries in the world, with a GDP of 17.7 trillion dollars and a population of 325 million people with a life expectancy of 78 years. It has a diverse economy comprising of technology, pharmaceuticals, and food products. The country is also home to the richest man in the world.

2. China

China’s GDP is 14.14 trillion dollars. Over the years, the country has registered the growth of its economy owing to its manufacturing capability, technology, and export base. It is slightly close to its big rival, the USA, and it is projected that it could soon surpass America in 2023.

3. Japan

Japan is a wealthy nation with a GDP of 5.15 trillion dollars. It has the third-largest economy in the world and a significant export base as well as a robust manufacturing industry.

4. Germany.
Germany has one of the largest economies in the world. It has a GDP of 3.8 trillion dollars. There are 82.7 million people with a life expectancy of 81 years. It is also the third-largest exporter of goods after the USA and China. Its biggest export is cars, which account for 12% of all German exports. The industry manufactures BMW’s Audi and Volkswagen. The nation boasts of having one of the best F1 drivers in the world.

5. India

This Asian nation has a GDP of 2.94 trillion dollars. India has a population of one billion people, which decreases its GDP per capita. There is still a large number of people who live in poverty. That said, the country gets its wealth from manufacturing industries and a reliable service sector.

6. United Kingdom
top most richest gulf countries


Image: pixabay.com
The country has a GDP of 2.83 trillion dollars. Its economy is driven by a strong services sector, manufacturing, and agriculture.

7. France
Richest countries in the world


Image: pixabay.com
France has a GDP of 2.6 trillion. Its population includes 67 million people with a life expectancy of 82 years. It is a wealthy country owing to exports worth 500 billion dollars. Exports include automobiles, aerospace equipment, and wine.

8. Italy
richest countries in the world list


Image: pixabay.com
This European nation has a GDP of 1.99 trillion dollars. Its economy is driven by a big export base and business investments locally and internationally.

9. Brazil
Richest countries in the world


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The largest country in South America has a GDP of 1.85 trillion dollars. Brazil is endowed with natural resources like tin, iron ore, and other minerals, which have helped drive the economy upwards.

10. Canada
Richest countries in the world


Image: pixabay.com
The country has a GDP of 1.73 trillion dollars and a population of 36.7 million people with a life expectancy of 82 years. It is a large exporter of crude oil behind Saudi Arabia and Iraq. The oil accounts for a large percentage of the country’s total export value.

11. Russia
Richest countries in the world


Image: pixabay.com
The country has a GDP of 1.64 trillion dollars. In the 1990s, its economy witnessed a commodity boom from the industrial and agricultural sectors. Other than that, the country has also made wealth through oil. The country has also garnered acclaim for being among the first to produce a Covid 19 vaccine.

12. South Korea
Richest countries in the world


Image: pixabay.com
This Asian giant has a GDP of 1.63 trillion dollars. It is known for its robust technology with the manufacture of Samsung and Hyundai. Its economy is driven by trade and industrialization.

13. Spain
Richest countries in the world


Image: pixabay.com
With a GDP of 1.4 trillion dollars, Spain boasts of a large service sector as it receives many tourists, agriculture with exports like olive oil and wine, pharmaceuticals, and machinery.

14. Australia
Richest countries in the world


Image: pixabay.com
Australia has a GDP of 1.38 trillion dollars and a population of 24.6 million people with a life expectancy of 82 years. The country produces a lot of iron and is the world’s largest producer of the minerals. Iron is highly consumed in the world market and offers great investment returns, thus making Australia a rich country.

15. Mexico
Richest countries in the world


Image: pixabay.com
The South American nation has a GDP of 1.22 trillion dollars. The economy here is driven by oil exports, electronics, automotive, tourism, and financial services.

16. Indonesia
Richest countries in the world


Image: pixabay.com
With a GDP of 1.11 trillion dollars, this Asian country has managed to be among the top 25 wealthiest countries. The economy here is driven by agriculture and a strong industrial sector.

17. Netherlands
Richest countries in the world


Image: pixabay.com
This is a wealthy European country with a GDP of 835.8 billion dollars with a population of 17.1 million and a life expectancy of 81 years. Its main exports include horticulture and medical technologies.

18. Saudi Arabia
richest countries in the world


Image: pixabay.com
This is one of the richest countries in the Arab world, owing to oil resources. It has a GDP of 779.2 billion, with a population of 32.9 million, and a life expectancy of 74 years. It is the largest exporter of crude oil in the world. This country is a monarchy.

19. Turkey
Richest countries in the world


Image: pixabay.com
With a GDP of 743.7 billion dollars, this middle eastern nation has managed to call itself wealthy owing to big industries and services.

20. Switzerland
Richest countries in the world


Image: pixabay.com
Switzerland has a GDP of 715.3 billion dollars and a population of 8.5 people with a life expectancy of 83 years. Its source of wealth is gold, which holds the largest share of its exports. The country’s economic backbone is innovation as it invests a large amount of GDP on research and development.

21. United Arab Emirates
richest countries in the world


Image: pixabay.com
This country has a GDP of 632.6 billion dollars, with a population of 9.4 million people and a life expectancy of 77 years. UAE gets its wealth from exports of crude oil, gas, gold, and diamonds, making it one of the top richest countries in the world. It has one of the lowest unemployment rates in the world.

22. Sweden
Richest countries in the world


Image: pixabay.com
This country has a GDP of 528.9 billion dollars, a population of 10.1 million, and a life expectancy of 82 years. Its most considerable investment is education. As a result, the country has the highest primary school enrollment, and its residents are well educated.

23. Belgium
The 25 richest countries


Image: pixabay.com
Belgium has a GDP of 517 billion dollars and a population of 11.4 million people. The life expectancy here is 81 years, an indication of high standards of living. It is a big exporter of goods, which account for more than 85% of its GDP. Its wealth is gained from medicine, petroleum, diamonds, and cars.

24. Singapore
Richest countries in the world


Image: pixabay.com
This Asian nation connects mainland Asia to the rest of the world. It has a GDP of 340 billion dollars, with a population of 5.6 million people and a life expectancy of 82 years. The country is the largest seller of microchips and other technologies, which make up 36% of its exports. Singapore is open to much of the world, given it has visa-free accessibility.

25. Qatar
Richest countries in the world


Image: pixabay.com
Qatar is one of the richest countries globally. It is located in the Middle East, in the Arabian Peninsula. It has a GDP of 183 billion dollars, making it the richest country in the world. It has a total population of 2.6 million people living up to 78 years. Qatar gets its wealth from oil reserves that are the backbone of its economy.

FAQs
Here are the most common questions about the richest countries.

What is the richest country in the world 2020?
The United States of America is the richest country in the world, with a GDP of 17.7 trillion dollars. America has made its wealth from technology, a huge showbiz industry, and pharmaceuticals.

What are top five oil rich countries?
Oil rich countries are popularly known as oil-producing and exporting countries. They include:

  • Qatar
  • Brunei
  • Kuwait
  • UAE
  • Norway
  • Saudi Arabia
  • Canada
  • Finland
  • Bahrain
What are the top 5 richest country in the world?
Here are the top 5 richest countries in the world by GDP, meaning by the value of things they produce. They include:

  • USA
  • China
  • Japan
  • Germany
  • India
The richest countries in the world have a GDP worth billions of dollars. They usually source their wealth from resources like crude oil, pharmaceuticals, and minerals.


US GDP is $ 21.44 tril in 2020.. Cheki upya.. Naona ur pro- Chinese

ECONOMY ECONOMICS
The Top 20 Economies in the World
Ranking the Richest Countries in the World
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By CALEB SILVER
Updated Mar 18, 2020
TABLE OF CONTENTS
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Countries by GDP
1. United States
2. China
3. Japan
4. Germany
5. India
6. United Kingdom
7. France
8. Italy
9. Brazil
10. Canada
11. Russia
12. South Korea
13. Spain
14. Australia
15. Mexico
16. Indonesia
17. Netherlands
18. Saudi Arabia
19. Turkey
20. Switzerland
Countries by GDP
The different phases of economic cycles toss economies around the world. However, it’s interesting to see that these top economies don't budge easily from the positions they hold. When compared to the top 20 economies of 1980, 17 are still present on the list, which means only three new entrants.


In addition to the key players remaining almost the same, this analysis reveals these economies are the engine of growth, commanding a majority of the global wealth. The nominal GDP of the top 10 economies adds up to about 66% of the world's economy, while the top 20 economies contribute almost 79%.1 The remaining 173 countries together constitute less than one-fourth to the world's economy.

This list is based on the IMF's World Economic Outlook Database, October 2019.


Nominal GDP = Gross domestic product, current prices, U.S. dollars
GDP based on PPP = Gross domestic product, current prices, purchasing power parity, international dollars
Gross domestic product per capita, current prices, U.S. dollars
Gross domestic product based on purchasing-power-parity (PPP) share of world total, percent


1. United States
U.S. Nominal GDP: $21.44 trillion - U.S. GDP (PPP): $21.44 trillion
The U.S. has retained its position of being the world's largest economy since 1871. The size of the U.S. economy was at $20.58 trillion in 2018 in nominal terms and is expected to reach $22.32 trillion in 2020. The U.S. is often dubbed as an economic superpower and that's because the economy constitutes almost a quarter of the global economy, backed by advanced infrastructure, technology, and an abundance of natural resources.

When the economies are assessed in terms of purchasing power parity, the U.S. loses its top spot to its close competitor China. In 2019, the U.S. economy, in terms of GDP (PPP), was at $21.44 trillion, while the Chinese economy was measured at $27.31 trillion. The gap between the size of the two economies in terms of nominal GDP is expected to lessen by 2023; the U.S. economy is projected to grow to $24.88 trillion by 2023, followed closely by China at $19.41 trillion.


2. China
China Nominal GDP: $14.14 trillion - China GDP (PPP): $27.31 trillion
China has experienced exponential growth over the past few decades, breaking the barriers of a centrally-planned closed economy to evolve into a manufacturing and exporting hub of the world. China is often referred to as the "world's factory," given its huge manufacturing and export base. However, over the years, the role of services has gradually increased and that of manufacturing as a contributor to GDP has declined relatively. Back in 1980, China was the seventh-largest economy, with a GDP of $305.35 billion, while the size of the U.S. then was $2.86 trillion. Since it initiated market reforms in 1978, the Asian giant has seen an economic growth averaging 10% annually. In recent years, the pace of growth has slowed, although it remains high in comparison to its peer nations.

The IMF projects a growth of 5.8% in 2020, which would sober down to around 5.6% by 2023. Over the years, the difference in the size of the Chinese and the U.S. economy has been shrinking rapidly. In 2018, the Chinese GDP in nominal terms stood at $13.37 trillion, lower than the U.S. by $7.21 trillion. In 2020, the gap is expected to reduce to $7.05 trillion, and by 2023, the difference would be $5.47 trillion. In terms of GDP in PPP, China is the largest economy, with a GDP (PPP) of $25.27 trillion. By 2023, China's GDP (PPP) would be $36.99 trillion. China's huge population brings down its GDP per capita to $10,100 (seventieth position).


3. Japan
Japan Nominal GDP: $5.15 trillion- Japan GDP (PPP): $5.75 trillion
Japan is the third-largest economy in the world, with its GDP crossing the $5 trillion mark in 2019. The financial crisis of 2008 rocked the Japanese economy and it's been a challenging time for its economy since then. The global crisis triggered a recession, followed by weak domestic demand and huge public debt. When the economy was beginning to recover, it suffered a massive earthquake that hit the country socially and economically. While the economy has broken the deflationary spiral, economic growth remains muted.

Its economy will get some stimulus with the 2020 Olympics keeping the investment flow strong, which is backed by a lax monetary policy by the Bank of Japan. Japan slips to the fourth spot when GDP is measured in terms of PPP; GDP (PPP) is $5.75 trillion in 2019, while its GDP per capita is $40,850 (24th spot).

4. Germany
Germany Nominal GDP: $3.86 trillion - Germany GDP (PPP): $4.44 trillion
Germany is not just Europe's largest economy but also the strongest. On the global scale, it is the fourth-largest economy in terms of nominal GDP, with a $4 trillion GDP. The size of its GDP in terms of purchasing power parity is $4.44 trillion, while its GDP per capita is $46,560 (18th place). Germany was the third-largest economy in nominal terms in 1980, with a GDP of $850.47 billion.

The nation has been dependent upon capital good exports, which suffered a setback post-2008 financial crisis. The economy grew by 2.2% and 2.5% in 2016 and 2017, respectively. However, the IMF says this slipped to 1.5% and 0.5% in 2018 and 2019, respectively. To bolster its manufacturing strength in the current global scenario, Germany has launched Industrie 4.0—its strategic initiative to establish the country as a lead market and provider of advanced manufacturing solutions.

5. India
India Nominal GDP: $2.94 trillion-India GDP (PPP): $10.51 trillion
India is the fastest-growing trillion-dollar economy in the world and the fifth-largest overall, with a nominal GDP of $2.94 trillion. India has become the fifth-largest economy in 2019, overtaking the United Kingdom and France. The country ranks third when GDP is compared in terms of purchasing power parity at $11.33 trillion. When it comes to calculating GDP per capita, India's high population drags its nominal GDP per capita down to $2,170. The Indian economy was just $189.438 billion in 1980, ranking 13th on the list globally. India's growth rate is expected to rise from 7.3% in 2018 to 7.5% in 2019 as drags from the currency exchange initiative and the introduction of the goods and services tax fade, according to the IMF.

India’s post-independence journey began as an agrarian nation; however, over the years the manufacturing and services sector has emerged strongly. Today, its service sector is the fastest-growing sector in the world, contributing to more than 60% to its economy and accounting for 28% of employment. Manufacturing remains as one of its crucial sectors and is being given due push via the governments' initiatives, such as "Make in India." Although the contribution of its agricultural sector has declined to around 17%, it still is way higher in comparison to the western nations. The economy's strength lies in a limited dependence on exports, high saving rates, favorable demographics, and a rising middle class.

6. United Kingdom
U.K. Nominal GDP: $2.83 trillion - U.K. GDP (PPP): $3.04 trillion
The United Kingdom, with a $2.83 trillion GDP is the sixth largest economy in the world. When compared in terms of GDP purchasing-power-parity, U.K. slips to the ninth spot with a GDP-PPP of $3.04 trillion. It ranks 23rd in terms of GDP per capita, which is $42,558. Its nominal GDP is estimated to remain at $2.83 trillion during 2019, but its ranking is expected to slide to the seventh spot by 2023 with its GDP of $3.27 trillion.

Starting from 1992 until 2008, the economy of the U.K. witnessed an uptrend in each quarter. However, it witnessed a decline in its output for five consecutive quarters starting April 2008. The economy shrunk by 6% during this time (between the first quarter of 2008 and the second quarter of 2009) and eventually took five years to grow back to the pre-recession levels, according to data from the Office of National Statistics.

The economy of the U.K. is primarily driven by the services sector, which contributes more than 75% of its GDP, with manufacturing the second prominent segment, followed by agriculture. Although agriculture is not a major contributor to its GDP, 60% of the U.K.'s food needs are produced domestically, even though less than 2% of its labor force is employed in the sector.

7. France
France Nominal GDP: $2.71 trillion - France GDP (PPP): $2.96 trillion
France, the most-visited country in the world, is the third-largest economy of Europe and the sixth-largest in the world, with a nominal GDP of $2.78 trillion. Its GDP in terms of purchasing power parity is around $2.96 trillion. The country offers a high standard of living to its people as reflected in its GDP per capita of $42,877.56. In recent years, the economic growth has slowed, resulting in unemployment that has placed immense pressure on the government to reboot the economy. The World Bank has recorded unemployment rates at 10% during 2014, 2015, and 2016. During 2017, it declined to 9.681%.

In addition to tourism, which remains very important for its economy, France is a leading agricultural producer, accounting for about one-third of all agricultural land within the European Union. France is the world's sixth-largest agricultural producer and the second-largest agricultural exporter, after the United States. The manufacturing sector is primarily dominated by the chemical industry, automotive, and armament industries. The economy has grown by 2.3% during 2017 and is expected to grow 1.8% and 1.7% during 2018 and 2019 as per the IMF.

8. Italy
Italy Nominal GDP: $1.99 trillion - Italy GDP (PPP): $2.40 trillion
With a nominal GDP of $2.07 trillion, Italy is the world’s eighth-largest economy. Its economy is expected to expand to $2.26 trillion by 2023. In terms of GDP (PPP), its economy is worth $2.40 trillion and it has a per capita GDP of $34,260.34. Italy—a prominent member of the eurozone—has been facing deep political and economic chaos. Its unemployment rate continues to be in double-digits, while its public debt remains sticky at around 132% of GDP.

On the positive side, exports and business investment are driving economic recovery. The economy clocked 0.9% and 1.5% in 2016 and 2017, respectively. It is projected to edge down to 1.2% in 2018 and 1.0% in 2019.

9. Brazil
Brazil Nominal GDP: $1.85 trillion - Brazil GDP (PPP): $3.37 trillion
Brazil is the largest and most populous nation in Latin America. With a nominal GDP of $1.87 trillion, Brazil is the ninth-largest economy in the world. The nation that had been riding on the commodity wave suffered multiple setbacks with the end of the commodity supercycle, in addition to internal problems of corruption and political uncertainty, which dampened the investment and business environment.

During 2006–2010, the nation grew at an average 4.5%, moderating to around 2.8% in 2011–2013. By 2014, it was barely growing at 0.1%. In 2016, Brazil contracted by 3.5% before rebounding by 1% in 2017. IMF projects the economic growth to revive to 2.5% by 2019. Brazil is part of the BRICS, along with Russia, India, China, and South Africa. The country has a GDP (PPP) of $3.37 trillion and a GDP per capita of $8,967.66.

10. Canada
Canada Nominal GDP: $1.73 trillion - Canada GDP (PPP): $1.84 trillion
Canada displaced Russia to take the 10th spot in 2015 and has retained its position since then. Canada's nominal GDP is currently at $1.71 trillion and is expected to touch $1.74 trillion in 2019 and $2.13 trillion by 2023. Its per capita GDP of $46,260.71 is ranked 20th globally, while its GDP of $1.84 trillion in terms of PPP pulls it down to the 17th spot.

The country has contained its level of unemployment and it's likely to further shrink. While services are the major sector, manufacturing is the cornerstone of the economy, with 68% of its exports constituting of merchandise exports. Canada is laying a lot of emphasis on manufacturing, which is crucial to its future economic growth. Canada registered a growth of 3% in 2017 vis-à-vis 1.4% in 2016 and is expected to grow 2% during 2018 and 2019.

11. Russia
Russia Nominal GDP: $1.64 trillion - Russia GDP (PPP): $4.21 trillion
Russia, the largest country on Earth in terms of landmass, is the 11th-largest economy in the world, with a nominal GDP of $1.63 trillion. Russia moves up the ladder to the sixth spot for rankings, with a $4.21 trillion GDP based on PPP.

The 1990s were a rough period for its economy, since it inherited a devastated industrial and agricultural sector along with the fundamentals of a centrally planned economy. During the next decade, Russia witnessed growth at a healthy pace of 7%. However, this growth was led by the commodity boom.

The dependence of the Russian economy on oil was exposed during the 2008–2009 global financial crisis and eventually again in 2014. The situation worsened with the imposition of sanctions by the West. The economy contracted by 0.2% in 2016, however, it rebounded with a 1.5% growth in 2017. IMF projects a growth of 1.7% and 1.5% during 2018 and 2019, respectively.

12. South Korea
South Korea Nominal GDP: $1.63 trillion - South Korea GDP (PPP): $2.14 trillion
The South Korean economy, known for conglomerates like Samsung and Hyundai, is the 12th largest economy in the world, with a nominal GDP of $1.62 trillion. The country has made incredible progress in the past couple of decades to establish itself as a hi-tech, industrialized nation.

Over the past four decades, South Korea has demonstrated incredible economic growth and global integration to become an industrialized economy. During the 1960s, its GDP per capita was among the poorer countries in the world, which is now at the 29th spot with $31,345.62. Its GDP (PPP) is at $2.14 trillion. South Korea entered the trillion-dollar club in 2004, propelled by international trade and industrialization. It is among the top exporters in the world and presents great investment opportunities, reflected in its ease of doing business ranking.

13. Spain
Spain Nominal GDP: $1.4 trillion - Spain GDP (PPP): $1.86 trillion
The $1.4 trillion Spanish economy is the 13th-largest in the world. Post-Brexit, Spain is the fourth-largest economy in the eurozone. The country, with a population of 46.6 million, has witnessed a long recessionary period (second quarter of 2008 until the third quarter of 2013) and is slowing returning to health on the back of record tourism and exports, along with a revival in domestic consumption.

Spain replaced the United Kingdom to become the second most-visited country in the world, with a huge influx of inbound tourists. In terms of sectors, agriculture has traditionally played a crucial role, however, with time the contribution of this sector has fallen to about 3%. The country remains a major exporter of olive oil, pork, and wine. Some of the prominent industrial sectors are automobiles, chemicals, pharmaceuticals, and industrial machinery. The economy grew 3.1% in 2017 and is expected to edge down to 2.8% and 2.2% in 2018 and 2019, respectively.

14. Australia
Australia Nominal GDP: $1.38 trillion - Australia GDP (PPP): $1.32 trillion
Australia is the 14th-largest economy, with a nominal GDP of $1.42 trillion. The economy has grown at a healthy pace for the past two decades on the back of low unemployment, low public debt and inflation, robust exports, a strong service sector, and a stable financial system. Australia is also a land rich in natural resources, as well as a major exporter of energy and food.

In terms of different sectors of its economy, agriculture and industry contribute about 4% and 26%, respectively, while its service sector, which engages 75% of its employed population, contributes 70% to its GDP. It is estimated that the economy of Australia will be close to the $1.7 trillion mark by 2023 and its GDP based on PPP, which is currently at $1.32 trillion, will be nearing $1.65 trillion during the same time period. Australia ranks 11th on the measure in terms of GDP per capita, with $56,351.58 in 2018.

15. Mexico
Mexico Nominal GDP: $1.22 trillion - Mexico GDP (PPP): $2.57 trillion
Mexico, the second-largest economy in Latin America, is the 15th-largest economy in the world, with a nominal GDP of $1.22 trillion, while its GDP in terms of PPP is $2.57 trillion. The same are expected to touch $1.50 trillion and $3.18 trillion, respectively, by 2023. Back in 1980, Mexico was the 10th-largest economy, with a nominal GDP of $228.6 billion.

The economy expanded by 2.9% and 2% during 2016 and 2017. Over the next two years, the IMF projects a growth of 2.3% and 2.7%, respectively. The share of agriculture in the Mexican economy has remained under 4% over the last two decades, while its industry and services contribute around 33% and 63% to its output. Automotive, oil, and electronics are among the developed industries, while financial services and tourism are prominent contributors within services.

16. Indonesia
Indonesia Nominal GDP: $1.11 trillion - Indonesia GDP (PPP): $3.50 trillion
Indonesia is the largest economy in Southeast Asia and the 16th-largest on the global map. The Indonesian economy has shown tremendous progress over the last two decades. It was a victim of the Asian financial crisis in 1997. However, it has charted impressive growth ever since.

The economy is now a part of the trillion-dollar club, with a nominal GDP of $1.02 trillion. The World Bank cites its enormous progress on poverty reduction—"cutting the poverty rate to more than half since 1999, to 10.9% in 2016." Its GDP per capita at $3,871 is way higher than it was in 2000 at $857. Indonesia, the fourth most populous nation, is the seventh-largest economy, with a $3.50 trillion GDP in terms of purchasing power parity. Among sectors, agriculture contributes about 14% to its GDP, while industry and services add approximately 43% each to its output.

17. Netherlands
Netherlands Nominal GDP: $902.36 billion - Netherlands GDP (PPP): $969.23 billion
The Netherlands, the sixth largest economy in the European Union, is the 17th-largest economy in the world. Back in 1980, the Netherlands was the 12th-largest economy globally, with a GDP of $189.49 billion. Today, the country has a nominal GDP of $912.90 billion and a GDP-PPP of $969.23 billion. It ranks 13th on the basis of per capita income, with a GDP per capita of $53,106.38.

The economy is backed by abundant natural resources, booming tourism, and sound industries like food processing, chemicals, electrical machinery, and petroleum refining. The Netherlands can boast of its highly mechanized, highly productive agricultural sector, which makes it among the top agricultural exporters globally. Despite its small landmass, the Netherlands is a major player in the world's trade.

18. Saudi Arabia
Saudi Arabia Nominal GDP: $779.29 billion - Saudi Arabia GDP (PPP): $1.86 trillion
Saudi Arabia is predominantly an oil-based economy. The country possesses around 18% of the world's proven petroleum reserves. It ranks as the largest exporter of petroleum, with the oil and gas sectors accounting for about 50% of its GDP and 70% of its export earnings. Saudi Arabia is rich in other natural resources like natural gas, iron ore, gold, and copper.

The economy showed recovery from the oil shock in 2016 with a 1.7% growth. In 2017, it incurred a huge budget deficit, financed by foreign reserves and bond sales. The country is looking to bolster its non-oil economy in order to diversify its economy and tackle the problem of unemployment. In 2018, its nominal GDP was $782.48 billion, while its GDP based on PPP was $1.86 trillion. The economy, which slumped by 0.9% in 2017, is expected to grow by 1.9% in 2018 and 2019.

19. Turkey
Turkey Nominal GDP: $743.71 billion - Turkey GDP (PPP): $2.29 trillion
Turkey, with its $766.43 billion economy, is the 19th-largest economy in the world. The share of Turkey's middle-class increased from 18% to 41% of the population between 1993 and 2010, according to the World Bank, and the country joined the upper-middle income group in the late 2000s.

The economy is projected to join the trillion-dollar club by 2023, while its GDP-PPP will reach $2.78 trillion that same year. Between 1960 and 2012, Turkey's average annual GDP growth was 4.5%.

The economy has been growing at an impressive pace since the 2000s, driven by both industry and services. Its economy witnessed macroeconomic and fiscal stability, while its employment and income levels witnessed an increase. The economy registered a 7.4% growth in 2017. However, it is projected to soften to 4.2% in 2018 amid rising external debt, depreciating currency, rising inflation, and unemployment.

20. Switzerland
Switzerland Nominal GDP: $715.36 billion - Switzerland GDP (PPP): $548.48 billion
Switzerland is one of the most stable market economies in the world. It is the 20th-largest economy in the world, with a nominal GDP of $703.75 billion. The country offers a very high standard of living for its people, represented by the GDP per capita of $82,950.28, which is only behind Luxembourg.

Switzerland has a booming tourism industry and a strong financial sector. Switzerland also has a long tradition of industry, especially the clock and watches industry and pharmaceuticals. Agriculture only contributes about 1% to its GDP. The country has a highly skilled workforce and low unemployment (3%). The country’s economy benefits from its stable political system, sound infrastructure, and favorable tax rates. In recent years, its growth rate has hovered between 1–1.5%.

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Related Terms
Gross Domestic Product (GDP)
Gross domestic product (GDP) is the monetary value of all finished goods and services made within a country during a specific period. more
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History and Criticism of Brazil, Russia, India and China (BRIC)
BRIC (Brazil, Russia, India, and China) refers to the idea that China and India will, by 2050, become the world's dominant suppliers of manufactured goods and services, respectively, while Brazil and Russia will become similarly dominant as suppliers of raw materials. more
Advanced Economies Definition
Advanced economy is a term used by the International Monetary Fund (IMF) to describe developed countries with significant industrialization. more
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mzalendoalltz

JF-Expert Member
Mar 25, 2015
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US GDP is $ 21.44 tril in 2020.. Cheki upya.. Naona ur pro- Chinese

ECONOMY ECONOMICS
The Top 20 Economies in the World
Ranking the Richest Countries in the World
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By CALEB SILVER
Updated Mar 18, 2020
TABLE OF CONTENTS
CLOSE
Countries by GDP
1. United States
2. China
3. Japan
4. Germany
5. India
6. United Kingdom
7. France
8. Italy
9. Brazil
10. Canada
11. Russia
12. South Korea
13. Spain
14. Australia
15. Mexico
16. Indonesia
17. Netherlands
18. Saudi Arabia
19. Turkey
20. Switzerland
Countries by GDP
The different phases of economic cycles toss economies around the world. However, it’s interesting to see that these top economies don't budge easily from the positions they hold. When compared to the top 20 economies of 1980, 17 are still present on the list, which means only three new entrants.


In addition to the key players remaining almost the same, this analysis reveals these economies are the engine of growth, commanding a majority of the global wealth. The nominal GDP of the top 10 economies adds up to about 66% of the world's economy, while the top 20 economies contribute almost 79%.1 The remaining 173 countries together constitute less than one-fourth to the world's economy.

This list is based on the IMF's World Economic Outlook Database, October 2019.


Nominal GDP = Gross domestic product, current prices, U.S. dollars
GDP based on PPP = Gross domestic product, current prices, purchasing power parity, international dollars
Gross domestic product per capita, current prices, U.S. dollars
Gross domestic product based on purchasing-power-parity (PPP) share of world total, percent


1. United States
U.S. Nominal GDP: $21.44 trillion - U.S. GDP (PPP): $21.44 trillion
The U.S. has retained its position of being the world's largest economy since 1871. The size of the U.S. economy was at $20.58 trillion in 2018 in nominal terms and is expected to reach $22.32 trillion in 2020. The U.S. is often dubbed as an economic superpower and that's because the economy constitutes almost a quarter of the global economy, backed by advanced infrastructure, technology, and an abundance of natural resources.

When the economies are assessed in terms of purchasing power parity, the U.S. loses its top spot to its close competitor China. In 2019, the U.S. economy, in terms of GDP (PPP), was at $21.44 trillion, while the Chinese economy was measured at $27.31 trillion. The gap between the size of the two economies in terms of nominal GDP is expected to lessen by 2023; the U.S. economy is projected to grow to $24.88 trillion by 2023, followed closely by China at $19.41 trillion.


2. China
China Nominal GDP: $14.14 trillion - China GDP (PPP): $27.31 trillion
China has experienced exponential growth over the past few decades, breaking the barriers of a centrally-planned closed economy to evolve into a manufacturing and exporting hub of the world. China is often referred to as the "world's factory," given its huge manufacturing and export base. However, over the years, the role of services has gradually increased and that of manufacturing as a contributor to GDP has declined relatively. Back in 1980, China was the seventh-largest economy, with a GDP of $305.35 billion, while the size of the U.S. then was $2.86 trillion. Since it initiated market reforms in 1978, the Asian giant has seen an economic growth averaging 10% annually. In recent years, the pace of growth has slowed, although it remains high in comparison to its peer nations.

The IMF projects a growth of 5.8% in 2020, which would sober down to around 5.6% by 2023. Over the years, the difference in the size of the Chinese and the U.S. economy has been shrinking rapidly. In 2018, the Chinese GDP in nominal terms stood at $13.37 trillion, lower than the U.S. by $7.21 trillion. In 2020, the gap is expected to reduce to $7.05 trillion, and by 2023, the difference would be $5.47 trillion. In terms of GDP in PPP, China is the largest economy, with a GDP (PPP) of $25.27 trillion. By 2023, China's GDP (PPP) would be $36.99 trillion. China's huge population brings down its GDP per capita to $10,100 (seventieth position).


3. Japan
Japan Nominal GDP: $5.15 trillion- Japan GDP (PPP): $5.75 trillion
Japan is the third-largest economy in the world, with its GDP crossing the $5 trillion mark in 2019. The financial crisis of 2008 rocked the Japanese economy and it's been a challenging time for its economy since then. The global crisis triggered a recession, followed by weak domestic demand and huge public debt. When the economy was beginning to recover, it suffered a massive earthquake that hit the country socially and economically. While the economy has broken the deflationary spiral, economic growth remains muted.

Its economy will get some stimulus with the 2020 Olympics keeping the investment flow strong, which is backed by a lax monetary policy by the Bank of Japan. Japan slips to the fourth spot when GDP is measured in terms of PPP; GDP (PPP) is $5.75 trillion in 2019, while its GDP per capita is $40,850 (24th spot).

4. Germany
Germany Nominal GDP: $3.86 trillion - Germany GDP (PPP): $4.44 trillion
Germany is not just Europe's largest economy but also the strongest. On the global scale, it is the fourth-largest economy in terms of nominal GDP, with a $4 trillion GDP. The size of its GDP in terms of purchasing power parity is $4.44 trillion, while its GDP per capita is $46,560 (18th place). Germany was the third-largest economy in nominal terms in 1980, with a GDP of $850.47 billion.

The nation has been dependent upon capital good exports, which suffered a setback post-2008 financial crisis. The economy grew by 2.2% and 2.5% in 2016 and 2017, respectively. However, the IMF says this slipped to 1.5% and 0.5% in 2018 and 2019, respectively. To bolster its manufacturing strength in the current global scenario, Germany has launched Industrie 4.0—its strategic initiative to establish the country as a lead market and provider of advanced manufacturing solutions.

5. India
India Nominal GDP: $2.94 trillion-India GDP (PPP): $10.51 trillion
India is the fastest-growing trillion-dollar economy in the world and the fifth-largest overall, with a nominal GDP of $2.94 trillion. India has become the fifth-largest economy in 2019, overtaking the United Kingdom and France. The country ranks third when GDP is compared in terms of purchasing power parity at $11.33 trillion. When it comes to calculating GDP per capita, India's high population drags its nominal GDP per capita down to $2,170. The Indian economy was just $189.438 billion in 1980, ranking 13th on the list globally. India's growth rate is expected to rise from 7.3% in 2018 to 7.5% in 2019 as drags from the currency exchange initiative and the introduction of the goods and services tax fade, according to the IMF.

India’s post-independence journey began as an agrarian nation; however, over the years the manufacturing and services sector has emerged strongly. Today, its service sector is the fastest-growing sector in the world, contributing to more than 60% to its economy and accounting for 28% of employment. Manufacturing remains as one of its crucial sectors and is being given due push via the governments' initiatives, such as "Make in India." Although the contribution of its agricultural sector has declined to around 17%, it still is way higher in comparison to the western nations. The economy's strength lies in a limited dependence on exports, high saving rates, favorable demographics, and a rising middle class.

6. United Kingdom
U.K. Nominal GDP: $2.83 trillion - U.K. GDP (PPP): $3.04 trillion
The United Kingdom, with a $2.83 trillion GDP is the sixth largest economy in the world. When compared in terms of GDP purchasing-power-parity, U.K. slips to the ninth spot with a GDP-PPP of $3.04 trillion. It ranks 23rd in terms of GDP per capita, which is $42,558. Its nominal GDP is estimated to remain at $2.83 trillion during 2019, but its ranking is expected to slide to the seventh spot by 2023 with its GDP of $3.27 trillion.

Starting from 1992 until 2008, the economy of the U.K. witnessed an uptrend in each quarter. However, it witnessed a decline in its output for five consecutive quarters starting April 2008. The economy shrunk by 6% during this time (between the first quarter of 2008 and the second quarter of 2009) and eventually took five years to grow back to the pre-recession levels, according to data from the Office of National Statistics.

The economy of the U.K. is primarily driven by the services sector, which contributes more than 75% of its GDP, with manufacturing the second prominent segment, followed by agriculture. Although agriculture is not a major contributor to its GDP, 60% of the U.K.'s food needs are produced domestically, even though less than 2% of its labor force is employed in the sector.

7. France
France Nominal GDP: $2.71 trillion - France GDP (PPP): $2.96 trillion
France, the most-visited country in the world, is the third-largest economy of Europe and the sixth-largest in the world, with a nominal GDP of $2.78 trillion. Its GDP in terms of purchasing power parity is around $2.96 trillion. The country offers a high standard of living to its people as reflected in its GDP per capita of $42,877.56. In recent years, the economic growth has slowed, resulting in unemployment that has placed immense pressure on the government to reboot the economy. The World Bank has recorded unemployment rates at 10% during 2014, 2015, and 2016. During 2017, it declined to 9.681%.

In addition to tourism, which remains very important for its economy, France is a leading agricultural producer, accounting for about one-third of all agricultural land within the European Union. France is the world's sixth-largest agricultural producer and the second-largest agricultural exporter, after the United States. The manufacturing sector is primarily dominated by the chemical industry, automotive, and armament industries. The economy has grown by 2.3% during 2017 and is expected to grow 1.8% and 1.7% during 2018 and 2019 as per the IMF.

8. Italy
Italy Nominal GDP: $1.99 trillion - Italy GDP (PPP): $2.40 trillion
With a nominal GDP of $2.07 trillion, Italy is the world’s eighth-largest economy. Its economy is expected to expand to $2.26 trillion by 2023. In terms of GDP (PPP), its economy is worth $2.40 trillion and it has a per capita GDP of $34,260.34. Italy—a prominent member of the eurozone—has been facing deep political and economic chaos. Its unemployment rate continues to be in double-digits, while its public debt remains sticky at around 132% of GDP.

On the positive side, exports and business investment are driving economic recovery. The economy clocked 0.9% and 1.5% in 2016 and 2017, respectively. It is projected to edge down to 1.2% in 2018 and 1.0% in 2019.

9. Brazil
Brazil Nominal GDP: $1.85 trillion - Brazil GDP (PPP): $3.37 trillion
Brazil is the largest and most populous nation in Latin America. With a nominal GDP of $1.87 trillion, Brazil is the ninth-largest economy in the world. The nation that had been riding on the commodity wave suffered multiple setbacks with the end of the commodity supercycle, in addition to internal problems of corruption and political uncertainty, which dampened the investment and business environment.

During 2006–2010, the nation grew at an average 4.5%, moderating to around 2.8% in 2011–2013. By 2014, it was barely growing at 0.1%. In 2016, Brazil contracted by 3.5% before rebounding by 1% in 2017. IMF projects the economic growth to revive to 2.5% by 2019. Brazil is part of the BRICS, along with Russia, India, China, and South Africa. The country has a GDP (PPP) of $3.37 trillion and a GDP per capita of $8,967.66.

10. Canada
Canada Nominal GDP: $1.73 trillion - Canada GDP (PPP): $1.84 trillion
Canada displaced Russia to take the 10th spot in 2015 and has retained its position since then. Canada's nominal GDP is currently at $1.71 trillion and is expected to touch $1.74 trillion in 2019 and $2.13 trillion by 2023. Its per capita GDP of $46,260.71 is ranked 20th globally, while its GDP of $1.84 trillion in terms of PPP pulls it down to the 17th spot.

The country has contained its level of unemployment and it's likely to further shrink. While services are the major sector, manufacturing is the cornerstone of the economy, with 68% of its exports constituting of merchandise exports. Canada is laying a lot of emphasis on manufacturing, which is crucial to its future economic growth. Canada registered a growth of 3% in 2017 vis-à-vis 1.4% in 2016 and is expected to grow 2% during 2018 and 2019.

11. Russia
Russia Nominal GDP: $1.64 trillion - Russia GDP (PPP): $4.21 trillion
Russia, the largest country on Earth in terms of landmass, is the 11th-largest economy in the world, with a nominal GDP of $1.63 trillion. Russia moves up the ladder to the sixth spot for rankings, with a $4.21 trillion GDP based on PPP.

The 1990s were a rough period for its economy, since it inherited a devastated industrial and agricultural sector along with the fundamentals of a centrally planned economy. During the next decade, Russia witnessed growth at a healthy pace of 7%. However, this growth was led by the commodity boom.

The dependence of the Russian economy on oil was exposed during the 2008–2009 global financial crisis and eventually again in 2014. The situation worsened with the imposition of sanctions by the West. The economy contracted by 0.2% in 2016, however, it rebounded with a 1.5% growth in 2017. IMF projects a growth of 1.7% and 1.5% during 2018 and 2019, respectively.

12. South Korea
South Korea Nominal GDP: $1.63 trillion - South Korea GDP (PPP): $2.14 trillion
The South Korean economy, known for conglomerates like Samsung and Hyundai, is the 12th largest economy in the world, with a nominal GDP of $1.62 trillion. The country has made incredible progress in the past couple of decades to establish itself as a hi-tech, industrialized nation.

Over the past four decades, South Korea has demonstrated incredible economic growth and global integration to become an industrialized economy. During the 1960s, its GDP per capita was among the poorer countries in the world, which is now at the 29th spot with $31,345.62. Its GDP (PPP) is at $2.14 trillion. South Korea entered the trillion-dollar club in 2004, propelled by international trade and industrialization. It is among the top exporters in the world and presents great investment opportunities, reflected in its ease of doing business ranking.

13. Spain
Spain Nominal GDP: $1.4 trillion - Spain GDP (PPP): $1.86 trillion
The $1.4 trillion Spanish economy is the 13th-largest in the world. Post-Brexit, Spain is the fourth-largest economy in the eurozone. The country, with a population of 46.6 million, has witnessed a long recessionary period (second quarter of 2008 until the third quarter of 2013) and is slowing returning to health on the back of record tourism and exports, along with a revival in domestic consumption.

Spain replaced the United Kingdom to become the second most-visited country in the world, with a huge influx of inbound tourists. In terms of sectors, agriculture has traditionally played a crucial role, however, with time the contribution of this sector has fallen to about 3%. The country remains a major exporter of olive oil, pork, and wine. Some of the prominent industrial sectors are automobiles, chemicals, pharmaceuticals, and industrial machinery. The economy grew 3.1% in 2017 and is expected to edge down to 2.8% and 2.2% in 2018 and 2019, respectively.

14. Australia
Australia Nominal GDP: $1.38 trillion - Australia GDP (PPP): $1.32 trillion
Australia is the 14th-largest economy, with a nominal GDP of $1.42 trillion. The economy has grown at a healthy pace for the past two decades on the back of low unemployment, low public debt and inflation, robust exports, a strong service sector, and a stable financial system. Australia is also a land rich in natural resources, as well as a major exporter of energy and food.

In terms of different sectors of its economy, agriculture and industry contribute about 4% and 26%, respectively, while its service sector, which engages 75% of its employed population, contributes 70% to its GDP. It is estimated that the economy of Australia will be close to the $1.7 trillion mark by 2023 and its GDP based on PPP, which is currently at $1.32 trillion, will be nearing $1.65 trillion during the same time period. Australia ranks 11th on the measure in terms of GDP per capita, with $56,351.58 in 2018.

15. Mexico
Mexico Nominal GDP: $1.22 trillion - Mexico GDP (PPP): $2.57 trillion
Mexico, the second-largest economy in Latin America, is the 15th-largest economy in the world, with a nominal GDP of $1.22 trillion, while its GDP in terms of PPP is $2.57 trillion. The same are expected to touch $1.50 trillion and $3.18 trillion, respectively, by 2023. Back in 1980, Mexico was the 10th-largest economy, with a nominal GDP of $228.6 billion.

The economy expanded by 2.9% and 2% during 2016 and 2017. Over the next two years, the IMF projects a growth of 2.3% and 2.7%, respectively. The share of agriculture in the Mexican economy has remained under 4% over the last two decades, while its industry and services contribute around 33% and 63% to its output. Automotive, oil, and electronics are among the developed industries, while financial services and tourism are prominent contributors within services.

16. Indonesia
Indonesia Nominal GDP: $1.11 trillion - Indonesia GDP (PPP): $3.50 trillion
Indonesia is the largest economy in Southeast Asia and the 16th-largest on the global map. The Indonesian economy has shown tremendous progress over the last two decades. It was a victim of the Asian financial crisis in 1997. However, it has charted impressive growth ever since.

The economy is now a part of the trillion-dollar club, with a nominal GDP of $1.02 trillion. The World Bank cites its enormous progress on poverty reduction—"cutting the poverty rate to more than half since 1999, to 10.9% in 2016." Its GDP per capita at $3,871 is way higher than it was in 2000 at $857. Indonesia, the fourth most populous nation, is the seventh-largest economy, with a $3.50 trillion GDP in terms of purchasing power parity. Among sectors, agriculture contributes about 14% to its GDP, while industry and services add approximately 43% each to its output.

17. Netherlands
Netherlands Nominal GDP: $902.36 billion - Netherlands GDP (PPP): $969.23 billion
The Netherlands, the sixth largest economy in the European Union, is the 17th-largest economy in the world. Back in 1980, the Netherlands was the 12th-largest economy globally, with a GDP of $189.49 billion. Today, the country has a nominal GDP of $912.90 billion and a GDP-PPP of $969.23 billion. It ranks 13th on the basis of per capita income, with a GDP per capita of $53,106.38.

The economy is backed by abundant natural resources, booming tourism, and sound industries like food processing, chemicals, electrical machinery, and petroleum refining. The Netherlands can boast of its highly mechanized, highly productive agricultural sector, which makes it among the top agricultural exporters globally. Despite its small landmass, the Netherlands is a major player in the world's trade.

18. Saudi Arabia
Saudi Arabia Nominal GDP: $779.29 billion - Saudi Arabia GDP (PPP): $1.86 trillion
Saudi Arabia is predominantly an oil-based economy. The country possesses around 18% of the world's proven petroleum reserves. It ranks as the largest exporter of petroleum, with the oil and gas sectors accounting for about 50% of its GDP and 70% of its export earnings. Saudi Arabia is rich in other natural resources like natural gas, iron ore, gold, and copper.

The economy showed recovery from the oil shock in 2016 with a 1.7% growth. In 2017, it incurred a huge budget deficit, financed by foreign reserves and bond sales. The country is looking to bolster its non-oil economy in order to diversify its economy and tackle the problem of unemployment. In 2018, its nominal GDP was $782.48 billion, while its GDP based on PPP was $1.86 trillion. The economy, which slumped by 0.9% in 2017, is expected to grow by 1.9% in 2018 and 2019.

19. Turkey
Turkey Nominal GDP: $743.71 billion - Turkey GDP (PPP): $2.29 trillion
Turkey, with its $766.43 billion economy, is the 19th-largest economy in the world. The share of Turkey's middle-class increased from 18% to 41% of the population between 1993 and 2010, according to the World Bank, and the country joined the upper-middle income group in the late 2000s.

The economy is projected to join the trillion-dollar club by 2023, while its GDP-PPP will reach $2.78 trillion that same year. Between 1960 and 2012, Turkey's average annual GDP growth was 4.5%.

The economy has been growing at an impressive pace since the 2000s, driven by both industry and services. Its economy witnessed macroeconomic and fiscal stability, while its employment and income levels witnessed an increase. The economy registered a 7.4% growth in 2017. However, it is projected to soften to 4.2% in 2018 amid rising external debt, depreciating currency, rising inflation, and unemployment.

20. Switzerland
Switzerland Nominal GDP: $715.36 billion - Switzerland GDP (PPP): $548.48 billion
Switzerland is one of the most stable market economies in the world. It is the 20th-largest economy in the world, with a nominal GDP of $703.75 billion. The country offers a very high standard of living for its people, represented by the GDP per capita of $82,950.28, which is only behind Luxembourg.

Switzerland has a booming tourism industry and a strong financial sector. Switzerland also has a long tradition of industry, especially the clock and watches industry and pharmaceuticals. Agriculture only contributes about 1% to its GDP. The country has a highly skilled workforce and low unemployment (3%). The country’s economy benefits from its stable political system, sound infrastructure, and favorable tax rates. In recent years, its growth rate has hovered between 1–1.5%.

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Four Asian Tigers Definition
The Four Asian Tigers define the high-growth economies of Hong Kong, Singapore, South Korea, and Taiwan. more
History and Criticism of Brazil, Russia, India and China (BRIC)
BRIC (Brazil, Russia, India, and China) refers to the idea that China and India will, by 2050, become the world's dominant suppliers of manufactured goods and services, respectively, while Brazil and Russia will become similarly dominant as suppliers of raw materials. more
Advanced Economies Definition
Advanced economy is a term used by the International Monetary Fund (IMF) to describe developed countries with significant industrialization. more
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Outdated data, usa GDP is more than 20 trillion USD while china is still trailing by 7trillion USD
 

BUSH BIN LADEN

JF-Expert Member
Mar 16, 2019
2,735
2,000
India ya 5
Brazil ya 9
Alafu Emirates ya 21 🤣
Na Qatar ya 25 🤣

Argentina siioni wala Tanzania yetu jamani
Sio mtaalam wa uchumi lakini nadhani hapa wamerefer uchumi wa taifa sio raia mmoja mmoja. Ndo maana kwenye ile list ya mataifa ambayo kwa raia mmoja mmoja wana kipata kikubwa unavikuta vinchi vingi vidogo vidogo mfano Qatar, Singapore, Switzerland, Luxenborg, Hongkong nk.
Ni sawa na shule ya seminary ina wahitimu 20 tu na wote wana div 1 na shule ya umma ambayo ina wahitimi 200 na katika hawa 90 wana div 1 pia wa div 2, 3, 4 na 0. Kwenye matokeo kitaifa utaambiwa hii seminary imeizidi perfomance shule ya umma
 

Dalmine

JF-Expert Member
Sep 8, 2016
4,601
2,000
Sio mtaalam wa uchumi lakini nadhani hapa wamerefer uchumi wa taifa sio raia mmoja mmoja. Ndo maana kwenye ile list ya mataifa ambayo kwa raia mmoja mmoja wana kipata kikubwa unavikuta vinchi vingi vidogo vidogo mfano Qatar, Singapore, Switzerland, Luxenborg, Hongkong nk.
Ni sawa na shule ya seminary ina wahitimu 20 tu na wote wana div 1 na shule ya umma ambayo ina wahitimi 200 na katika hawa 90 wana div 1 pia wa div 2, 3, 4 na 0. Kwenye matokeo kitaifa utaambiwa hii seminary imeizidi perfomance shule ya umma

Shukrani sheikh 🙂
 

Makanyaga

JF-Expert Member
Sep 28, 2007
5,296
2,000
Kwenye orodha yoyote ya Nchi tajiri list ikishakuwa ina Uingereza wakati Finland, Denmark na Norway zinamiss, ujue kuwa list hio ni fake. List yoyote hata kama ingekuwa ni ya top ten, Sweden, Finland, Denmark na Norway haziwezi kukosekana!
 

Makanyaga

JF-Expert Member
Sep 28, 2007
5,296
2,000
Kwenye orodha yoyote ya Nchi tajiri halafu list ikishakuwa ina Uingereza wakati Finland, Denmark na Norway zinamiss, ujue kuwa list hio ni fake. List yoyote hata kama ingekuwa ni ya top ten, Sweden, Finland, Denmark na Norway haziwezi kukosekana!
 

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