Road trip to Dar es Salaam

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Geza Ulole

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Oct 31, 2009
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Road trip to Dar es Salaam

At 1,000 kilometres apart, it sure is a long way from Nairobi to Dar es Salaam.
NVCMeru4.jpg

The Dar es Salaam skyline as seen from the from harbour from where ferries sail to Zanzibar or cross over to southern Tanzania like to Kilwa and Rifiji River. Photo/Rupi Mangat

In Summary



  • The road to Dar is lined with numerous natural features and a lot of history, and the stay at the coastal city is worth every minute.


At 1,000 kilometres apart, it sure is a long way from Nairobi to Dar es Salaam. I have taken this road before by bus when I was on my last shilling in Tanzania and I am eager to do it in the comfort of a private car this time around.

Transiting through Namanga, the border town, I notice that there is a new set of buildings housing the immigration offices, and moving from one country to the other is smooth since Kenyans are not required to fill in any cards. This bustling little border town marks the beginning of the mountain-scapes with the hills of Namanga or Ol Donyo Orok.


After the official crossing, we are met with sights of vast plains followed by acacia woodlands which then give way to more savannah.

The Maasai graze their livestock in the plains where white flowers abound in full bloom.


The smooth roads in Tanzania are a driving pleasure. Past Longido, a mountain by the side of the road that can be scaled in a day, we see Mount Meru – a perfect triangular cone – and then we see Kilimanjaro's highest peak, Kibo, peeking through the clouds.


Both mountains, 70 kilometres, apart boast volcanic origins. A while later we are at Arusha, a town which sitting at the base of the 14,977-foot Mt Meru commands a stunning view of one of the top 10 highest mountains in Africa. Mt Meru still rumbles but there has been no major eruption since 1910.


On our return journey a week later we see Kilimanjaro in its full glory with the saddle between the two peaks of Kibo and Mawenzi , a sliver of cloud at mid height and shards of snow on the dome.


Interesting landscape

In 1848 Johann Rebmann the German missionary explorer became the first European to report "something remarkably white on a high mountain." He realised it was a snow-capped mountain. He was ridiculed by other scholars for reporting something as ridiculous as snow near the equator.

The Chagga living by the mountain called it Njaro'meaning shining or white, hence the name Kilimanjaro: Kilima, Swahili for mountain and njaro for white.


The Taveta called it Kibo, an exclamation meaning, good heavens! Kibo is now the name of the tallest peak. In 1857 the English missionary Charles New reached its snowline while Dr Hans Meyer reached the summit in 1891. But it was not until1921 that Africa's tallest mountains true height was fixed at 19,321 feet.


The road continues to the next set of massifs – the Pare mountains which on the Kenyan side nestle Lake Jipe. The cliff faces and green hills create a fascinating skyline with neat sisal plantations on the plains below edged on by maize and sunflower fields.


A few kilometres later we're on to the Usambara range, which is part of a chain of mountains called the Eastern Arc Mountains that run from Kenya's Taita Hills to Tanzania's Uvidundwa Mountains.


The Eastern Arc mountains are also called the mist mountains because they catch the ocean winds to form the spectacular mist that keeps things green. We continue in the company of the mountains for the next 110 kilometres.


Then we whizz past the road sign to Mkomazi National Park which forms one ecosystem with Kenya's Tsavo West National Park. After a period of intense poaching it has been revived and packs of the once endangered African wild dog are used to guard herds of elephants.


We stop at Mombo, where a zig-zag mountain road leads to Lushoto with relics of the past German regime high up in the mountains. They introduced cash crops like lumber trees, coffee, tea, and quinine.


Fields of water-soaked rice cloak the plains by the mountains while coconut trees stand tall. As day turns into night we enter the ‘City of Peace'. Dar in Arabic means home and Salaam is the Arabic word for peace.


Around 1865, the then sultan of Zanzibar, Majid bin Said, began building the city and gave it its name. After his death in 1870, it went through a period of decline. It became the administrative centre of German East Africa in 1887.


Industry grew with the construction of the central railway line in the early 1900's much like Kenya's Lunatic Line. The Indians built their grand homes that still stand and painted them pink, the colour of the nationalism period.


For the next few days, I am awed by Dar es Salaam's recent transformation after the socialist period. Luxury yachts bop on the aquamarine waters of the Indian Ocean. Beautiful high rise buildings stand in the central city with apartment blocks and tiny mabati-roofed houses from a century ago.


A rapid transport system will be in operation later this year. Meanwhile with little danger of being mugged, we enjoy late evening strolls in the neighbourhood of Kariakor to relish in Dar's pavement dishes – kebabs, mshkaki, tandoori chicken, prawns and tuna.

Road trip to Dar es Salaam - Saturday_Magazine - nation.co.ke



MY TAKE
The pink color for the houses in dar is not out of the Indian nationalism but those are NHC Houses that will be demolished to pave a way for new structures and painted recently! BTW Kibo is the name for the highest peak and not the Mt as a whole is not originally from Taveta people but Chaggas just like Mawenzi and Shira peaks! Get your facts right and stop claiming a piece of Kilimanjaro!

Bantugbro, Ab-Titchaz, Dhuks, mwitaz, livefire, Nairoberry, Koborer, Askari Kanzu, lawmaina78, mwathai, Ngongo, kadoda11, nomasana, NairobiWalker,Wacha1,Kiranga, Koba, Ndahani, Candid Scope, FaizaFoxy, The Conquerer, EMT, MziziMkavu, CattleRustler, EngineerLMG, Frank quails, Gulioni, jolyta,Jungumawe,Sinister, Bulldog, bagamoyo
 
At 1,000 kilometres apart, it sure is a long
way from Nairobi to Dar es Salaam.
Sure man miles apart physically, lord have mercy further apart emotionally. We fail to effect living communication.
 
At 1,000 kilometres apart, it sure is a long
way from Nairobi to Dar es Salaam.
Sure man miles apart physically, lord have mercy further apart emotionally. We fail to effect living communication.
with exception of his attempt to try to rewrite the history on Mt Kilimanjaro and her names, and calling Arusha a town instead of a city he acknowledged the superior roads in Tanzania compared to Kenya's
 
with exception of his attempt to try to rewrite the history on Mt Kilimanjaro and her names, and calling Arusha a town instead of a city he acknowledged the superior roads in Tanzania compared to Kenya's

very sick man. rehab material
 
very sick man. rehab material

Road trip to Dar es Salaam

At 1,000 kilometres apart, it sure is a long way from Nairobi to Dar es Salaam.
NVCMeru4.jpg

The Dar es Salaam skyline as seen from the from harbour from where ferries sail to Zanzibar or cross over to southern Tanzania like to Kilwa and Rifiji River. Photo/Rupi Mangat

In Summary



  • The road to Dar is lined with numerous natural features and a lot of history, and the stay at the coastal city is worth every minute.



At 1,000 kilometres apart, it sure is a long way from Nairobi to Dar es Salaam. I have taken this road before by bus when I was on my last shilling in Tanzania and I am eager to do it in the comfort of a private car this time around.

Transiting through Namanga, the border town, I notice that there is a new set of buildings housing the immigration offices, and moving from one country to the other is smooth since Kenyans are not required to fill in any cards. This bustling little border town marks the beginning of the mountain-scapes with the hills of Namanga or Ol Donyo Orok.


After the official crossing, we are met with sights of vast plains followed by acacia woodlands which then give way to more savannah.

The Maasai graze their livestock in the plains where white flowers abound in full bloom.


The smooth roads in Tanzania are a driving pleasure. Past Longido, a mountain by the side of the road that can be scaled in a day, we see Mount Meru – a perfect triangular cone – and then we see Kilimanjaro's highest peak, Kibo, peeking through the clouds.

Both mountains, 70 kilometres, apart boast volcanic origins. A while later we are at Arusha, a town which sitting at the base of the 14,977-foot Mt Meru commands a stunning view of one of the top 10 highest mountains in Africa. Mt Meru still rumbles but there has been no major eruption since 1910.


On our return journey a week later we see Kilimanjaro in its full glory with the saddle between the two peaks of Kibo and Mawenzi , a sliver of cloud at mid height and shards of snow on the dome.


Interesting landscape

In 1848 Johann Rebmann the German missionary explorer became the first European to report "something remarkably white on a high mountain." He realised it was a snow-capped mountain. He was ridiculed by other scholars for reporting something as ridiculous as snow near the equator.

The Chagga living by the mountain called it Njaro'meaning shining or white, hence the name Kilimanjaro: Kilima, Swahili for mountain and njaro for white.


The Taveta called it Kibo, an exclamation meaning, good heavens! Kibo is now the name of the tallest peak. In 1857 the English missionary Charles New reached its snowline while Dr Hans Meyer reached the summit in 1891. But it was not until1921 that Africa's tallest mountains true height was fixed at 19,321 feet.


The road continues to the next set of massifs – the Pare mountains which on the Kenyan side nestle Lake Jipe. The cliff faces and green hills create a fascinating skyline with neat sisal plantations on the plains below edged on by maize and sunflower fields.


A few kilometres later we're on to the Usambara range, which is part of a chain of mountains called the Eastern Arc Mountains that run from Kenya's Taita Hills to Tanzania's Uvidundwa Mountains.


The Eastern Arc mountains are also called the mist mountains because they catch the ocean winds to form the spectacular mist that keeps things green. We continue in the company of the mountains for the next 110 kilometres.


Then we whizz past the road sign to Mkomazi National Park which forms one ecosystem with Kenya's Tsavo West National Park. After a period of intense poaching it has been revived and packs of the once endangered African wild dog are used to guard herds of elephants.


We stop at Mombo, where a zig-zag mountain road leads to Lushoto with relics of the past German regime high up in the mountains. They introduced cash crops like lumber trees, coffee, tea, and quinine.


Fields of water-soaked rice cloak the plains by the mountains while coconut trees stand tall. As day turns into night we enter the ‘City of Peace'. Dar in Arabic means home and Salaam is the Arabic word for peace.


Around 1865, the then sultan of Zanzibar, Majid bin Said, began building the city and gave it its name. After his death in 1870, it went through a period of decline. It became the administrative centre of German East Africa in 1887.


Industry grew with the construction of the central railway line in the early 1900's much like Kenya's Lunatic Line. The Indians built their grand homes that still stand and painted them pink, the colour of the nationalism period.


For the next few days, I am awed by Dar es Salaam's recent transformation after the socialist period. Luxury yachts bop on the aquamarine waters of the Indian Ocean. Beautiful high rise buildings stand in the central city with apartment blocks and tiny mabati-roofed houses from a century ago.


A rapid transport system will be in operation later this year. Meanwhile with little danger of being mugged, we enjoy late evening strolls in the neighbourhood of Kariakor to relish in Dar's pavement dishes – kebabs, mshkaki, tandoori chicken, prawns and tuna.

Road trip to Dar es Salaam - Saturday_Magazine - nation.co.ke
 
Road trip to Dar es Salaam

At 1,000 kilometres apart, it sure is a long way from Nairobi to Dar es Salaam.
NVCMeru4.jpg

The Dar es Salaam skyline as seen from the from harbour from where ferries sail to Zanzibar or cross over to southern Tanzania like to Kilwa and Rifiji River. Photo/Rupi Mangat

In Summary



  • The road to Dar is lined with numerous natural features and a lot of history, and the stay at the coastal city is worth every minute.



At 1,000 kilometres apart, it sure is a long way from Nairobi to Dar es Salaam. I have taken this road before by bus when I was on my last shilling in Tanzania and I am eager to do it in the comfort of a private car this time around.

Transiting through Namanga, the border town, I notice that there is a new set of buildings housing the immigration offices, and moving from one country to the other is smooth since Kenyans are not required to fill in any cards. This bustling little border town marks the beginning of the mountain-scapes with the hills of Namanga or Ol Donyo Orok.


After the official crossing, we are met with sights of vast plains followed by acacia woodlands which then give way to more savannah.

The Maasai graze their livestock in the plains where white flowers abound in full bloom.


The smooth roads in Tanzania are a driving pleasure. Past Longido, a mountain by the side of the road that can be scaled in a day, we see Mount Meru – a perfect triangular cone – and then we see Kilimanjaro's highest peak, Kibo, peeking through the clouds.

Both mountains, 70 kilometres, apart boast volcanic origins. A while later we are at Arusha, a town which sitting at the base of the 14,977-foot Mt Meru commands a stunning view of one of the top 10 highest mountains in Africa. Mt Meru still rumbles but there has been no major eruption since 1910.


On our return journey a week later we see Kilimanjaro in its full glory with the saddle between the two peaks of Kibo and Mawenzi , a sliver of cloud at mid height and shards of snow on the dome.


Interesting landscape

In 1848 Johann Rebmann the German missionary explorer became the first European to report "something remarkably white on a high mountain." He realised it was a snow-capped mountain. He was ridiculed by other scholars for reporting something as ridiculous as snow near the equator.

The Chagga living by the mountain called it Njaro'meaning shining or white, hence the name Kilimanjaro: Kilima, Swahili for mountain and njaro for white.


The Taveta called it Kibo, an exclamation meaning, good heavens! Kibo is now the name of the tallest peak. In 1857 the English missionary Charles New reached its snowline while Dr Hans Meyer reached the summit in 1891. But it was not until1921 that Africa's tallest mountains true height was fixed at 19,321 feet.


The road continues to the next set of massifs – the Pare mountains which on the Kenyan side nestle Lake Jipe. The cliff faces and green hills create a fascinating skyline with neat sisal plantations on the plains below edged on by maize and sunflower fields.


A few kilometres later we're on to the Usambara range, which is part of a chain of mountains called the Eastern Arc Mountains that run from Kenya's Taita Hills to Tanzania's Uvidundwa Mountains.


The Eastern Arc mountains are also called the mist mountains because they catch the ocean winds to form the spectacular mist that keeps things green. We continue in the company of the mountains for the next 110 kilometres.


Then we whizz past the road sign to Mkomazi National Park which forms one ecosystem with Kenya's Tsavo West National Park. After a period of intense poaching it has been revived and packs of the once endangered African wild dog are used to guard herds of elephants.


We stop at Mombo, where a zig-zag mountain road leads to Lushoto with relics of the past German regime high up in the mountains. They introduced cash crops like lumber trees, coffee, tea, and quinine.


Fields of water-soaked rice cloak the plains by the mountains while coconut trees stand tall. As day turns into night we enter the ‘City of Peace'. Dar in Arabic means home and Salaam is the Arabic word for peace.


Around 1865, the then sultan of Zanzibar, Majid bin Said, began building the city and gave it its name. After his death in 1870, it went through a period of decline. It became the administrative centre of German East Africa in 1887.


Industry grew with the construction of the central railway line in the early 1900's much like Kenya's Lunatic Line. The Indians built their grand homes that still stand and painted them pink, the colour of the nationalism period.


For the next few days, I am awed by Dar es Salaam's recent transformation after the socialist period. Luxury yachts bop on the aquamarine waters of the Indian Ocean. Beautiful high rise buildings stand in the central city with apartment blocks and tiny mabati-roofed houses from a century ago.


A rapid transport system will be in operation later this year. Meanwhile with little danger of being mugged, we enjoy late evening strolls in the neighbourhood of Kariakor to relish in Dar's pavement dishes – kebabs, mshkaki, tandoori chicken, prawns and tuna.

Road trip to Dar es Salaam - Saturday_Magazine - nation.co.ke
VERY SMOOTH ROADS INDEED IN DAR
[h=1]Hell on wheels in Dar's potholed roads[/h]
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Some roads in the city are in bad shape with the dangerous craters contributing to traffic jams and loss of life
By The Citizen Reporter

Posted Saturday, June 7 2014 at 09:26
In Summary

  • Many vehicle breakdowns and accidents happen as drivers try to avoid the potholes, according to some reports


Dar es Salaam. Motorists and other road users in the city have lately had a hard time navigating potholes and badly damaged roads--a common sight in nearly all major and feeder roads, a survey by The Citizen on Saturday shows.

The deep potholes, which motorists say they have not experienced for many years, are not only damaging cars, they are also seen as a major cause of the traffic jams on roads that are already in bad shape.

Many vehicle breakdowns and accidents happen as drivers try to avoid the potholes, according to some reports. Worse still, motorists must spend quite a significant amount of their hard-earned cash on repairs they did not budget for.
 
And the author seems to be wallowing in colonial mentality, despite living in an "independent" country. Wakenya bado wana safari ndefu!

namleta mada ni useless zaidi kuliko aliyesimulia akili za ushindani wa vitoto vya chekechea
 
KOSA LIPO WAPI?HABARI IMEANDIKWA TOKA GAZETI YA KENYA JUU YA UZURI YA TANZANIA WATU WENGINE WANACHUKIA mwandishi ameonyesha hali halisi TUACHE CHUKI MBAYA NA WIVU!
 
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