Well spoken, Olusegun Obasanjo!


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Well spoken, Olusegun Obasanjo!
Makwaia wa kuhenga
Daily News; Friday,June 06, 2008 @08:10

ONE thing remarkable about West Africans is that they are easily identifiable.

You can spot a Nigerian immediately upon eye contact. So you can spot a Senegalese. You can spot them most remarkably by the way they dress: the colourful robes and caps. How do you spot a Tanzanian?

This is certainly a huge question. In the assembly of several hundred of men and women gathered at the Sullivan Summit -- the “summit of our lifetime” - - there was one man who was remarkable in his attire.

That was no other than the former Nigerian Head of State, General Olusegun Obasanjo. His colourful long robe and a cap made him remarkable from an assembly of African people who, almost invariably all of them were dressed in welltailored western suits.

To me, watching from my TV set the opening of the Sullivan summit in Arusha on Monday this week, the scenario provided a very interesting observation.

What one clothes really means nothing. But is it also a reflection of the cultural independence of a given person? This is beside the point.

What I wanted really to observe, following the Sullivan conference in Arusha from Dar es Salaam is not exactly what Gen. Obasanjo wore, but what he spoke at the summit -- that is -- something in his head.

But before I come to this point, the first impression I got about the Sullivan summit, named after one of the best known African Americans of the United States of America, was that it was a summit of A f r i c a n - A m e r i c a n “investors” -- people with the money who are interested to come and invest in Africa.

But from the deliberations of the conference, I came to discover that it was more of a conference of activists and thinkers of African origin in the Diaspora than investors per se.

But then if it was a conference of ‘think tanks’ from the Diaspora having a parley with their kith and ki n in Africa, was it really necessary to have the meeting convened directly by the Tanzanian Government?

Isn’t this country running equally prestigious non-governmental organizations in the same footing like the Leon Sullivan Foundation?

This country has the Mwalimu Julius Nyerere Foundation right in place, alive and kicking.

It would have appeared natural and appropriate, wouldn’t it, for the Mwalimu Julius Nyerere Foundation to convene such a conference with the Tanzanian Government, the US Government and others coming in as partners; chipping in terms of financial support to support the logistics of hosting of the conference?

This misnomer, which raised eyebrows -- at least mine --, raised them even higher when I noted that only one TV station was franchised to cover the event -- obliging other local stations to be licensed by that favoured local station and at a fee! Why?

Why if it was taxpayers’ money that was deployed to convene and host the conference in the first place? Why the news monopoly?

These questions, however not insignificant, are besides the point of the thrust of this perspective today.

But they provide food for thought both for the Sullivan Foundation and the relevant authorities in this country; with the former urged to espouse very loftily local NGOs such as the Mwalimu Julius Nyerere Foundation.

And the reason is simple: practically all delegates from the Diaspora hold dignified and fond memories of the Father of this Nation, Mwalimu Julius Nyerere, as does the former Nigerian leader, Olusegun Obasanjo who is now retired and doing exactly what Mwalimu was doing in his retirement: Farming.

Watching the focus of Gen. Obasanjo as he spoke, I reflected that what he spoke would have been exactly the speech of Mwalimu Nyerere had he been alive: never to forget African real producers of wealth: the peasants of Africa.

The focus of General Obasanjo’s speech was agriculture and how to truly work to make it a worthy occupation for most of African rural people who constitute the majority of the African population.

General Obasanjo spoke with intimate passion the place of agriculture in the African economy, speaking in simple language what tilling the land means both for individual families across the world and the African economy in particular.

But unfortunately these days in this country, agriculture is not “politics” as it used to be before in the post independence first government of Dr Julius Nyerere.

We are occupied with other things such as minerals, which are just coincidental in our economy and, in essence, owned by external forces.

This perspective is joining General Obasanjo in his call to fellow Africans and Tanzanians in particular to take agriculture seriously and to liberate the peasant from the hand hoe.

We have to mechanize agriculture to ensure increased production. We have to shift from raindependant agriculture to irrigated farms -- what with our abundant water resource -- the twelve plus major rivers and springs in Tanzania alone.

Makwaia wa Kuhenga is a Senior Journalist and TV Host of a Weekly Show, Je, Tutafika? On local Channel Ten.

E - m a i l : makwaia@bol.co.tz Cell: 0754 366520.
 
LazyDog

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Well spoken, Olusegun Obasanjo!
Makwaia wa kuhenga
Daily News; Friday,June 06, 2008 @08:10

ONE thing remarkable about West Africans is that they are easily identifiable.

You can spot a Nigerian immediately upon eye contact. So you can spot a Senegalese. You can spot them most remarkably by the way they dress: the colourful robes and caps. How do you spot a Tanzanian?

This is certainly a huge question. In the assembly of several hundred of men and women gathered at the Sullivan Summit -- the "summit of our lifetime" - - there was one man who was remarkable in his attire.

That was no other than the former Nigerian Head of State, General Olusegun Obasanjo. His colourful long robe and a cap made him remarkable from an assembly of African people who, almost invariably all of them were dressed in welltailored western suits.

To me, watching from my TV set the opening of the Sullivan summit in Arusha on Monday this week, the scenario provided a very interesting observation.

What one clothes really means nothing. But is it also a reflection of the cultural independence of a given person? This is beside the point.

What I wanted really to observe, following the Sullivan conference in Arusha from Dar es Salaam is not exactly what Gen. Obasanjo wore, but what he spoke at the summit -- that is -- something in his head.

But before I come to this point, the first impression I got about the Sullivan summit, named after one of the best known African Americans of the United States of America, was that it was a summit of A f r i c a n - A m e r i c a n "investors" -- people with the money who are interested to come and invest in Africa.

But from the deliberations of the conference, I came to discover that it was more of a conference of activists and thinkers of African origin in the Diaspora than investors per se.

But then if it was a conference of ‘think tanks' from the Diaspora having a parley with their kith and ki n in Africa, was it really necessary to have the meeting convened directly by the Tanzanian Government?

Isn't this country running equally prestigious non-governmental organizations in the same footing like the Leon Sullivan Foundation?

This country has the Mwalimu Julius Nyerere Foundation right in place, alive and kicking.

It would have appeared natural and appropriate, wouldn't it, for the Mwalimu Julius Nyerere Foundation to convene such a conference with the Tanzanian Government, the US Government and others coming in as partners; chipping in terms of financial support to support the logistics of hosting of the conference?

This misnomer, which raised eyebrows -- at least mine --, raised them even higher when I noted that only one TV station was franchised to cover the event -- obliging other local stations to be licensed by that favoured local station and at a fee! Why?

Why if it was taxpayers' money that was deployed to convene and host the conference in the first place? Why the news monopoly?

These questions, however not insignificant, are besides the point of the thrust of this perspective today.

But they provide food for thought both for the Sullivan Foundation and the relevant authorities in this country; with the former urged to espouse very loftily local NGOs such as the Mwalimu Julius Nyerere Foundation.

And the reason is simple: practically all delegates from the Diaspora hold dignified and fond memories of the Father of this Nation, Mwalimu Julius Nyerere, as does the former Nigerian leader, Olusegun Obasanjo who is now retired and doing exactly what Mwalimu was doing in his retirement: Farming.

Watching the focus of Gen. Obasanjo as he spoke, I reflected that what he spoke would have been exactly the speech of Mwalimu Nyerere had he been alive: never to forget African real producers of wealth: the peasants of Africa.

The focus of General Obasanjo's speech was agriculture and how to truly work to make it a worthy occupation for most of African rural people who constitute the majority of the African population.

General Obasanjo spoke with intimate passion the place of agriculture in the African economy, speaking in simple language what tilling the land means both for individual families across the world and the African economy in particular.

But unfortunately these days in this country, agriculture is not "politics" as it used to be before in the post independence first government of Dr Julius Nyerere.

We are occupied with other things such as minerals, which are just coincidental in our economy and, in essence, owned by external forces.

This perspective is joining General Obasanjo in his call to fellow Africans and Tanzanians in particular to take agriculture seriously and to liberate the peasant from the hand hoe.

We have to mechanize agriculture to ensure increased production. We have to shift from raindependant agriculture to irrigated farms -- what with our abundant water resource -- the twelve plus major rivers and springs in Tanzania alone.

Makwaia wa Kuhenga is a Senior Journalist and TV Host of a Weekly Show, Je, Tutafika? On local Channel Ten.

E - m a i l : makwaia@bol.co.tz Cell: 0754 366520.

:)

Huo mtiririko mazee, ungetarajia aseme nini tena!?

Huwa napata uvivu kusoma hizi articles.
Ningekuwa nimegundua "Makwaia wa kuhenga" ndio mwandishi, pengine ningeisoma immediately Bubu alipoiweka hapa.

Asante sana!



.
 
Mwazange

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Mwazange

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Mambo ya kuCUT/COPY na kuPASTE hayo mzee.....tartiiiiibu mtu anachukua credit kama sio yeye vile.
 
Rufiji

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Rufiji

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Jamani mimi sio Mwandishi , ila huyu bwana sijui ameandika nini hapo juu . Inatia huruma sana kama huyu naye anajiita senior journalist.
 
LazyDog

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Jamani mimi sio Mwandishi , ila huyu bwana sijui ameandika nini hapo juu . Inatia huruma sana kama huyu naye anajiita senior journalist.

Kutofautiana naye inakubalika, sijaelewa kwa nini useme hivyo.


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Mwazange

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Mwazange

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What are you trying to say?
.
Article ndefu mno mkuu....Zinavyotokea gazetini; watu wanalipia, hivyo mwandishi hana budi kutanuatanua maneno yake ili gazeti lijae. Hapa fupisha ukigusia point unazotaka kusema, Itatosha, sio kutuhamishia gazeti zima.
 
Rufiji

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Rufiji

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Lazydog,

Please read it between the lines and you will understand what I said.
 
LazyDog

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LazyDog

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Lazydog,

Please read it between the lines and you will understand what I said.


All right. You don't have to say more if you don't want to.


.
 
LazyDog

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LazyDog

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Article ndefu mno mkuu....Zinavyotokea gazetini; watu wanalipia, hivyo mwandishi hana budi kutanuatanua maneno yake ili gazeti lijae. Hapa fupisha ukigusia point unazotaka kusema, Itatosha, sio kutuhamishia gazeti zima.

Sawa bwana. Hayo ni maoni yako, ila umezungumza mengi na ukayachanganya pamoja hata mimi kupata tabu kukuelewa.

- mtu anachukua credit
- watu wanalipia


Binafsi naona yaweza kujitokeza utata ikiwa tu swala la copyright limekiukwa. (That is if there is such a thing)
Tofauti na hapo wala sitegemei mleta habari atoe comments zake.



If we all contribute just a little bit, ...mambo mswano kabisa.
  • Mmoja akileta habari
  • Wengine wakasoma
  • Wengine wakasoma na ku-quote au ku-highlight kilichowavutia, mfano.
  • Wengine wakatoa comments
  • ....

Do you still have a problem with that?




.
 
Fidel80

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Fidel80

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Mambo ya kuCUT/COPY na kuPASTE hayo mzee.....tartiiiiibu mtu anachukua credit kama sio yeye vile.
Unamaanisha nn?Au yeye angefanyaje hapo ili kutuletea habari?
Kwani hiyo habari ameiandika yeye?
 
Mwazange

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Mwazange

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Lakini umeelewa nini nataka kukwambia si ndio? Basi dhumuni la lugha limetimia......Ila tu next time...usisome mistari miwili mitatu ya juu, halafu ukaona watu woote watakuwa interested kusoma habari yoote hiyo, ichambue then post points tu kama unataka watu wadiscuss...Clear?? Good!
 
Mwazange

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Mwazange

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Unamaanisha nn?Au yeye angefanyaje hapo ili kutuletea habari?
Kwani hiyo habari ameiandika yeye?
Hakuiandika yeye thats why angehighlight points tu anazotaka kusema...Thats what i meant....Ndio maana nikasema ameCUT na kuPASTE...
 
Kuhani

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Kuhani

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...usisome mistari miwili mitatu ya juu, halafu ukaona watu woote watakuwa interested kusoma habari yoote hiyo, ichambue then post points tu kama unataka watu wadiscuss...
Hakuiandika yeye thats why angehighlight points tu anazotaka kusema...
Mkuu, naomba nitofautiane kidogo.

Sio mara zote Bubu anapoleta habari huwa ana kitu chake anataka kusema. Mara nyingi naona anaweka habari kama ilivyo bila kusema lolote, na ninavyofikiri, ni kwa sababu analeta watu wasome, wenye mawazo wachangie.

Kwa mawazo yangu, naona anavyofanya, kuileta habari nzima nzima kama ilivyoandikwa kwenye gazeti, ni bora kuliko kuanza kuikatakata.

Kwanza, habari nzima inakupa context ya stori yote. Waandishi wa Bongo, wengi ni watupu, hawaandiki pembe zote zinazohusika na hiyo habari. Ukiikatakata ndio utazidi kupoteza picha ya habari. Kwa mfano, mwandishi wa Kibongo anaweza kuandika habari yenye kichwa, "TANESCO Yasema Wizi wa Mafuta ya Transformer Umeongezeka." Utasoma hiyo habari bila kuelezwa Mafuta ya Transformer yanaibiwa ya nini? Stori kama hii, ukiipiga panga tena, ndio sasa unaweza kuamini kwamba kumbe tatizo la Umeme ni kwa sababu wezi wanazima transformer waibe mafuta bila kupigwa mshtuko!

Pia, Bubu akikata kata stori na kuleta vipande anavyotaka vijadiliwe au hoja zake kuhusu hiyo stori, hapo sasa anaweza kuonekana ana spin mjadala uende anavyotaka pointi yake ichukuliwe. Ndo maana nadhani ni sawa anavyofanya, kutupa maoni yake pamoja na habari nzima.

Mwisho, unaweza kuona kwamba tupo ambao tunapenda kusoma habari nzima. Kwa hiyo, kusema kwamba asidhani wote tuko interested na habari nzima sio sahihi zaidi ya kusema asidhani wote hatuko interested na habari nzima. Yote mawili ni assumption, na assumption ya pili ni salama zaidi, kwa sababu ukiitegemea huwezi kwenda mrama. Asietaka kusoma atairuka!

Unless, tunasema ishu ni kujaza server za JF, jambo ambalo litafanya tuanze kutafutana humu, maana mada za "Kushushia Kahawa" zimejaa sana humu. Au tunasema ishu ni hakimiliki.

Jambo ambalo tumesema, uwepo wake hatujasikia. Na lingekuwepo tungesikia!
 

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