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Kenya media with jealous cum hate propaganda against Uganda

Discussion in 'Kenyan News and Politics' started by Geza Ulole, Oct 9, 2011.

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    Geza Ulole JF-Expert Member

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    As the turn of events unfolds, Kenyan media is again demonstrating its displeasure of Uganda's choice of Dar as its another route for its goods destined to overseas! For the keen observers, for the whole of the last week most of the Nationmedia newspapers have been covered with reports that apart from misrepresenting facts they have openly shown their disapproval of a sovereignty country's right to choose its destiny on how to trade! Reasons being Uganda wants to use the Southern corridor to transport its goods via Mwambani port in Tanga! Moreover Uganda has refused to accept an awkward offer by Kenya to refine its recently discovered oil in Mombasa (Nairobi Govt announced a white elephant project this week) and as it seems another slap is on the way as South Sudan may also decide to do the same!

    In its Businessdaily outlet of October 6, Allan Odhiambo put up map of Tanzania's railway infrastructure in his own preference and decided to interchange the location of Mara with Mwanza in a spirit to just demonstrate the Tanga-Kampala route is overstretched and unnecessary winding up to renders it nonviable option! Moreover he chose to skip the railway connection between Dar and Tanga as it stands today but preferred to shift it to another location that lengthen the distance apart from showing no connection exists between Mwanza and the central Railway! Fun enough the defunct Voi-Taveta connection is ressurected in his own imagination to just demonstrate his day dreaming wishes to see that works (not a bad idea but reality today is it does not function)! However the same dude was precise to show what he deedmed a viable option with no single mistake been shown!

    Moreover, on the East African of October 9, again though in a softer tone this time the Nationmedia covered Museveni having a strain at power instead of seeing the huge potentials that await Uganda with the flow of oil prospects in the near future that needs a highly superior infrastructure that Mombasa alone can't offer! If you try to analyse the message behind all these noises you will see there is a serious resentment of seeing Uganda decrease its heavy reliance on Kenya as an exit of its goods to the outer World! And though there is nothing these dudes can due except improving the infrastructure these dudes resort into smear campaigns to show their unreadiness to meet a challenge instead of using their media to advice their sleeping Government to improve that crapy infrastructure and retain the opportunity about to slip away!

    With this kind of attitude we see a sort of arrogance cum greedy these dudes are demonstrating again, why? since even a layman can make use of a simple internet to see the precise location of the Tanzania's Railways network! But suprizingly a journalist like Mr Odhiambo plus his editor could not see that misrepresentation of facts (needs to be fired)! Moreover the reason of a common market is to enhance competition be it on service provision or superior but affordable products from within the region but surprizingly these dudes don't see it that way but a threat to their weak dominance! i wonder how long will this so called EAC hold with some members clearly demonstrating protectionism spirit. Please leave Museveni alone, he knows the effect of having inflation reaching nearly 28% in less than 6 months and apart from emanating from the market factors is highly fueled by transport costs that keep fluctuating! And be kind enough to not potray him as a traitor just because he is seeking for another viable route to transport his goods plus the huge oil that is about to flow soon but no infrastructure to support a smooth transportation!

    See the articles
    [​IMG]
    Frustrated by costly logistical challenges between Mombasa port and its common border points at Malaba and Busia, Uganda has been searching for alternative trade routes in the EA region and the land locked Great Lake's region.


    Museveni hits back at Kenya with new transport corridor Frustrated by costly logistical challenges between Mombasa port and its common border points at Malaba and Busia, Uganda has been searching for alternative trade routes in the EA region and the land locked Great Lake's region. Uganda is taking strategic measures to cushion its market from potential transport disruptions in Kenya, the main transit route for goods destined to the landlocked Great Lake's region. The search by Uganda for alternative routes through Tanzania follows the near cut-off of the country from its trade partners by the mayhem that followed Kenya's disputed 2007 presidential election. "President (Yoweri) Museveni is trying to find options should things go wrong with next year's general election in Kenya," said Macharia Munene, an international relations analyst. The post-election violence saw protesters uproot railway lines and block key sections of the northern corridor - the road that leads to Uganda. The blockades caused an acute shortage of petroleum that triggered massive increases in the cost of basic items and forced thousands of Ugandans to walk to work due to lack of fuel. Mr Museveni this week stepped up negotiations with Tanzania for an alternative railway passage connecting the port of Tanga to Uganda despite the higher transport costs involved. Uganda has also announced tax rebates for traders importing oil through Tanzania, blaming administrative bottlenecks between the port of Mombasa and its common border points with Kenya at Malaba and Busia. The two moves would impact on Kenya's trade with the wider Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa, from where more than half of its trade is derived, with Uganda being its key trading partner. At a meeting with his Tanzanian host, Jakaya Kiwete on Monday, president Museveni pressed for the construction of a railway line linking Tanga and Musoma. The planned 800-kilometre joint venture railway would cost about $2.7 billion and link a proposed multi-billion dollar deep water port at Mwambani Bay in Tanga to Musoma on Lake Victoria, with onward connection to Kampala and Juba. The Central Corridor in Tanzania runs from Tanga and ends in Arusha, about 400 kilometres from Lake Victoria, meaning an extension measuring the same length would be needed to reach Musoma to the west. About $1.9 billion would be spent on the railway, $695.5 million on the Mwambani port and the rest used for the development of the Musoma dock. Uganda last month cut taxes on fuel imported through Tanzania by 15 per cent to bolster shipments via a supply route the country wants developed to end chronic shortages. The tax rebates come to about Sh5.30 (Ush150) per litre for an oil company that uses the Tanzanian route. The viability of the new routes, however, has been cast into doubt because of the costs and lead times for putting up new infrastructure and the distances involved that would make it more expensive than the Northern Corridor. "The so-called southern route through Tanzania is predominantly a road unlike the Kenyan side which also has a pipeline. This makes it relatively costly for transporters," said Mwendia Nyaga, an analyst in the Kenyan oil industry. Kenya has an oil pipeline from Mombasa to Eldoret, not far from the border with Uganda. The 1,170 kilometre road between Mombasa and Kampala is also in better shape and is much shorter than the route through central Tanzania, estimated at 1,500 kilometres. The pipeline is the cheapest mode of transport at about Sh43.86 ($.043) per tonne per kilometre within the northern corridor, followed by rail at Sh6.93 ($.068) per tonne per kilometre and road at Sh11,526($.113) per tonne per kilometre. Charges along the central route through Tanzania are about 20 per cent higher than those of the northern corridor where hidden costs such as delays take up 42 per cent of the overall costs. The costs on the central corridor through Tanzania are higher mainly due to the low capacity at the port of Dar-es-Salaam and the longer nature of the route. "Kenya has an elaborate pipeline network which makes sense to use the corridor from Eldoret into Uganda. The option of the Tanzania route is unpopular under normal circumstance," Mohammed Baraka, the managing director at GAPCO Oil said. By last week only one oil company had made contact with Uganda Revenue Authority (URA) to move its oil through Tanzania with most oil companies saying the route puts pressure on operational costs. "Given pound for pound one would settle for the Mombasa-Kampala stretch. It makes economic sense to a user seeking to move products competitively," Jimmy Mugerwa, managing director at Kenya Shell said. Analysts however said the port of Mombasa required expansion and modernisation to sustain trade with Uganda which remains the country's single largest trade partner. Currently Mombasa handles about 99 per cent of all cargo to Uganda, signifying the importance of upgrading the ports operations. Kenya Shippers Council CEO, Gilbert Lagat, said the low capacity and congestion at the port of Mombasa remains a draw back to users. "We also need to improve the railway system a little bit and we will be good to go with Uganda," Mr Baraka said. Boosting economy The rehabilitation of the rail network between Kenya and Uganda is vital in boosting regional economy through enhanced trade brought about by affordable transport. Although a much cheaper form of transport, the railway handles less than six per cent of cargo to Kenya, Uganda, Rwanda, Burundi, the Democratic Republic of Congo, parts of Tanzania, south Sudan and Ethiopia. In August, Rift Valley Railways International (RVRI) that manages the Kenya-Uganda railway received Sh14.7 billion from six international financiers including the International Finance Corporation (IFC), KfW of Germany and Equity Bank to help refurbish the joint rail network, buy new wagons and locomotives and replace information technology systems. Kenya and Uganda have repeatedly expressed frustration over failure by a consortium led by Sheltam Trade Close of South Africa that was granted the concession to run the railway in 2006 to make any significant improvement or investment in the joint railway line. Infrastructure experts, however, consider the metre gauge railway lines have become obsolete and would not support the region's transport needs even when rehabilitated. Museveni hits back at Kenya with new transport corridor *- Politics and policy*|businessdailyafrica.com

    Dar today, Nairobi tomorrow? Restless Museveni roams EA [​IMG] Uganda's President Yoweri Museveni. In recent months, Museveni has been taking care of neglected business in the neighbourhood. Photo/PHOEBE OKALL In Summary Some observers said Museveni's tete-a-tete with Kikwete was easily one of the most bizarre the Ugandan leader has had with any Head of State because aides did not sit in to take notes, and the presidential press unit photographers were allowed in to take a couple of shots, before being told to leave the big men to themselves. President Yoweri Museveni last week flew into Dar es Salaam for a one-day private visit ith his Tanzanian counterpart Jakaya Kikwete, setting off a flurry of speculation about why the Uganda president is so restless these days. Some observers said Museveni's tete-a-tete with Kikwete was easily one of the most bizarre the Ugandan leader has had with any Head of State because aides did not sit in to take notes, and the presidential press unit photographers were allowed in to take a couple of shots, before being told to leave the big men to themselves. Museveni's press secretary Tamale Mirundi told The EastAfrican, "This was a private visit; the president did not want the media giving publicity to things that have not yet matured." However, the visit comes on the heels of another one Museveni made to India a few days that was again billed as "private" and led to speculation that even made it to the floor of parliament that the Ugandan leader, after nearly 30 years in power, was feeling the strain of power and losing his grip. Yet that would be na├»ve, for even when his actions look irrational to outsiders, there is method in most of what Museveni does. The Uganda economy is hurting. While that is much the same story elsewhere in the world, Museveni has always been able to overcome criticism of his political highhandedness and corruption in his government because he delivered on the economy for years. As he faces the beginning of his last years in power, Museveni is focusing on his legacy and possibly his succession as well. Both will be easier if he can put the economy on a recovery path, which in turn means he must fix some of the things that have burdened the country's economy in recent years - crumbling infrastructure; the high costs of exporting and importing goods; and the slow pace at which East African regional integration has delivered significant benefits to Uganda's economy. An exiting Museveni needs to be able to be seen as relevant by other East African leaders. If he is perceived as a lame duck and regional leaders begin waiting on his successor, he will be seriously weakened at home. Unsurprisingly, in recent months, Museveni has been taking care of neglected business in the neighbourhood. He overcame his suspicion of the Rwanda leadership that arose from the clashes over influence in eastern DRC by visiting with President Paul Kagame, and invited Eritrea's Isaias Afewerki, a leader he viciously criticised as the backer of Islamic extremist militias in Somalia, to Kampala - where the two men hugged and proclaimed they had made up. "He has obviously been trying to mend fences. He visited Kagame after a long time, and followed that up with an invitation to Afewerki to Kampala recently. In meeting Kikwete privately, Museveni is trying to clear the bushes around his house," said Ugandan legislator Hussein Kyanjo. The issues Museveni discussed with Kikwete remain secret as neither leader issued a press statement after their meeting. However, reports later emerged that during the talks the two had agreed to expedite the construction of Tanga-Musoma railway line. This came as a surprise to long-time watchers of Tanzania-Uganda relations, because the Tanga-Musoma railway line, and the Dar es Salaam port are among those issues that are discussed with drama between the two countries every few years. There are usually launch ceremonies, lots of press coverage, and nothing comes of it. As early as 1998, when there seemed to be no end to the money that donors were willing to pour into infrastructure in Uganda, both the Ugandan and international media reported in December that plans to develop Tanga into a larger port dedicated mainly to Uganda's seaborne trade had been shelved, although at that time it was due to the failure by Tanzania to secure funding for the project. The project was conceived at a time of heightened political mistrust between Kenya and Uganda during president Daniel arap Moi's Kanu regime, and Museveni believed it to be a viable alternative to Mombasa. This time, there are again some who argue that given the fallout of the December 2007-January 2008 post-election violence in Kenya, Museveni is trying to open a reliable southern route to the Coast, to avoid the recurrence of the damage to the Uganda economy witnessed four years ago. Kenya, the EAC partner state that is Uganda's main transit route, goes to the polls next year. There could be a common thread linking the political to the economic. Next year could produce election hiccups in Kenya again. However, even if that were to happen, like 2008 it would not be permanent. The more permanent outcome of Kenya 2012 could be a leader who doesn't care much for the ageing Museveni as a regional political elder, and who is less inclined to be helpful than President Mwai Kibaki. Kenya, like Tanzania, has moved on infrastructure at a pace that has largely left Kampala looking sluggish over the years, although corruption and the distraction of internal and regional wars in Kampala are to equally blame. This is a good time to bring up the Tanga port issue, because it has the potential to get Kenya to move more quickly on other critical infrastructure like the railway, which has been bogged down by local politics at the Coast. Indeed, fixing the port of Mombasa is one strategic issue that lies at the heart of Kampala's national interest. In a report issued in June 2010, the World Bank demonstrated how delays at the port, multiple police roadblocks and inefficient border crossing points translated into significantly high costs of doing business in Uganda, Rwanda and the Democratic Republic of Congo. The World Bank estimated that it takes 20 days for a container cargo to get through from Mombasa to Nairobi. The same journey takes 22 days to Kampala and 24 days to Kigali. A study by CPCS Transcom published this June and sponsored by USAid established that road transport costs and indirect costs of port delays account for 35 and 42 per cent of the cost of importation of transit cargo through Kenya by road. In uncertain times like now, when the region is facing an exchange-rate crisis, this situation quickly fires up inflation, which in Uganda's case currently stands at 25 per cent. Uganda is the biggest regional customer for the port of Mombasa, accounting for 80 per cent of cargo. Tanzania, DR Congo and Rwanda account for five per cent each and Sudan 3.5 per cent. This year, Museveni faced a major political problem during the Walk to Work protests arising out of inflation and a currency crisis that could largely be traced to the inefficiency of the Mombasa port. It forced Museveni to make a private trip to Nairobi to discuss the issue with President Kibaki. "This issue has come up at EAC Heads of States Summit level," said David Nalo, Kenya's Permanent Secretary of EAC Affairs. "Our neighbours have been complaining that they cannot see significant progress on the ground when it comes to these non-tariff barriers to trade at a time when they are looking to be globally competitive." Mr Nalo said it was time Kenya started acting as a big brother "who is the greatest beneficiary of regional trade, and who should bear the greatest responsibility to reform." He added that Museveni's visit to Kikwete could have been "deliberately designed to irritate Kenyans into action on the issue of the Mombasa port; there is certainly justification for it." Mr Nalo said Kenya needs to urgently reflect on the strategic interests of each of its neighbouring countries and work toward helping them to promote these interests as opposed to cultivating a "fertile ground for discontent." Transporting goods from Mombasa through the Northern Corridor remains cheaper and relatively efficient compared with the alternative Central Corridor route from Dar es Saalam that Museveni is proposing. Constructing the Central Corridor will cost around $3 billion. It may be a pipe dream, but could be what is required to force Kenya to take political action towards fixing its port. And Kikwete, who has never been a member of the Museveni fan club, will nevertheless realise that with the promise of riches from Uganda's recently found, supposedly fabulous oilfields, the country that transports it would benefit greatly. Most of the businesses in Kenya that could benefit from Uganda's oil are supposedly sympathetic to Kibaki, so if nothing else, Kibaki too is more likely to break the deadlock and help Museveni. If these things come together in the next few months, a Museveni who can point to either Tanzania or Kenya - preferably both - finally working on long-talked-about infrastructure, will have his hand strengthened. And if Afewerki were to reward him by reining in the militants in Somalia, where Uganda troops form the bulk of the AU peacekeeping force Amisom, and Kagame is a little more deferential to him in future, Museveni would be in a good position to manage his last years in power and his exit. However, to do he would need to bring a level of cohesion to his ruling NRM that is sorely lacking, and restore his credibility by acting on corruption, nepotism, and widespread incompetence and neglect by his government. On past form, that would be a tough call. But the pursuit of a legacy can transform many an African strongman. Dar today, Nairobi tomorrow? Restless Museveni roams EA *- News*|theeastafrican.co.ke
     
  2. G

    Gad ONEYA JF-Expert Member

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    Mmmm, umombo bwana...''.......their disapproval of a sovereignity country......''
     
  3. Bantugbro

    Bantugbro JF-Expert Member

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    There is more substance in the post as a whole than that simple typo you tried to pick up....
     
  4. Smatta

    Smatta JF-Expert Member

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    Nice thread Geza, but I think you have a personal problem with Nation media and Kenya as a country, I saw your comments on the Economist last year about Kenya and I really wanted to call you out and correct whatever it is you were trying to pass across as the reality but i restrained myself.

    What you have copy pasted here is mostly true, but the most pressing question that you should ask yourself is, what has been preventing Uganda for all those years (considering the not so sweet relationship we have been having since the Moi regime) from getting an alternative route for its goods? Kenya is building a port in Lamu, do you know who the main client will be?
     
  5. wilbald

    wilbald JF-Expert Member

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    I know these people very well....."they always speak logically but not true"
     
  6. G

    Geza Ulole JF-Expert Member

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    Mind you Uganda has oil now so they can easily raise the money to build the Southern route since any bank can lend them money! So watch out Museveni's moves...Btw i neither hate Kenyans nor Kenyan media though i want them to change their mentality and think positive towards regional integration they should embrace competition and do away with subotaging acts towards other member's economic prospects that come from opinion of majority of Kenyans and via media as often their articles clearly demonstrate hard and blind efforts to support protectionism which is unhealth and unfair to a justified level competition (needed for a region to advance) that is soon to prove detrimental to the EAC block if nothing is done to contain their perception on competition!
     
  7. n

    nomasana JF-Expert Member

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    save that crap for birds.

    aren't you the same guy who day in day out is spewing venom against the intergration of the EAC???

    aren't you the same guy who uses nation media as your source when it suits your point???

    you contradict yourself repeatedly, how can anyone take you seriously???
     
  8. G

    Geza Ulole JF-Expert Member

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    you probably don't understand my articles...read them careful and you will understand i usually talk of its weakness...
     
  9. Smatta

    Smatta JF-Expert Member

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    You dont write articles, what you do is copy paste sh*t from sites and paste them here claiming they are your own. What you've brought here is a long summary from the papers you quoted above, of course with a little hate sprinkled here and there. your hate clouds your judgement and your view of the bigger picture, newspapers like every information media, willingly or unwillingly (not always though), are bound to misinform its readers or viewers, so its upon us to analyse the news and separate the chaff from the truth. I know its not supposed to be like that, but f*ck, this is the real world.
     
  10. G

    Geza Ulole JF-Expert Member

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    you have a problem for sure there is a universal freedom to analyze your media alignment towards a direction that doesn't serve the interests of the block as a whole! Otherwise in Kenya that freedom does not exist! BTW show me where i copied and paste on my analysis of your media/reporter's biased coverage...

    Here is another opinion from a disgruntled reader...

    Submitted by michael1990
    Posted October 10, 2011 08:30 AM

    As usual, the EA's Kenyan reporters take up an ordinary story and give it a sensationalist and alarmist angle with tons of unsubstantiated allegations and scaremongering! When will you grow up? Why are you shitting in your pants now when you have treated UG shabbily for so long?
     
  11. Smatta

    Smatta JF-Expert Member

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    That's why its an opinion, everybody has his and everyone is entitled to theirs. I asked you earlier, why hasn't UG after all the years of tense relationship between us, considered importing stuff using your ports? Why didn't you take the chance during the election crisis to woo Museveni to your side? Is the mentioned route economical? Can your port really handle the increase in importation if the deal comes to pass?
     
  12. G

    Geza Ulole JF-Expert Member

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    So you mean opinion cum comment can't en-light you of a reality that people are sick of your skewed and unprofessional coverage of EA affairs that is full of emotions, nationalism and protectionism! BTW None of the ports in EA can handle Uganda's goods stop lying yourself (the transportation costs are unbearably high plus time taken to do clearance not forgetting unwonted but coveted bureaucracy) that's why Museveni is looking for a possibility to have two (to enhance competition a pure economic sense)! I assume you should be expanding now just the way you queried Tanzania to expand over short period during the PEV! Unfortunately it is Kenya's media keeps ranting in disapproval while the opportunity is slipping away! Right now Uganda's dream is more realistic since every rich nation is willing to chest the bill of another corridor since they have dollar money! And distance of the route won't matter esp. if you consider the route will connect the existing Dar-Tanga-Arusha and Mara Region with a ferry to carry across the lake Victoria (a distance relatively the same to the Mombasa-Kampala)! Happy with that
     
  13. The Quonquerer

    The Quonquerer JF-Expert Member

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    by which definition of integration? yes we don't want it!
     
  14. Smatta

    Smatta JF-Expert Member

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    I think we are not on the same space time continuum, coz this EAC thingy happened a while back.. adjust your time machine to 2011 bro. and I don't remember anyone asking you if you want the integration or not..
     
  15. Wacha1

    Wacha1 JF-Expert Member

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    Kenya ni sawa na Dowans .... .... ..... ...
     
  16. m

    moyo JF-Expert Member

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    what do you mean by "my articles"?!.........now to your post...... what you have posted above is just your wishful thinking and Museveni has never been serious with this idea of seeking an alternative route from Mombasa with Tanzania.We heard this in 1998 and it has never materialized, why now!? may be M7 was just using this as an excuse too visit TZ....again who are you to complain for Uganda!? did they appoint you as their spokesman?...if really Tanzania is well prepared why are you afraid when we pinpoint your weaknesses and your in ability to handle such a venture not only logistically but intellectually!,and again are you (Tanzanians)so dumb that Museveni should tell you to build a railway line connecting TZ and UG when you should have already done it by now since Independence and market it to Uganda Burundi and Rwanda as an alternative route to Mombasa!? by the way ..Tanzania borders all East African countries.
    You have never hidden your dislike about Kenya,that's ok but for us we don't wait for other presidents to come and tell us what to do,we simply identify opportunities and strike,the way we have done by starting to build a new port in Lamu to serve not only Uganda,Burundi and Rwanda but also Ethiopia and Southern Sudan.The logistical problems at Mombasa port affects us all and that is what is being solved by the new port at Lamu,let it be complete and you will c how Uganda will abandon that idea of alternative route since we have already providing one for him.
    Let Ugandans speak for themselves.......continue your "hate Kenya mission'" but we thrive in that,we like competition because we have been brought up that way......about the oil in Uganda we will be major beneficiaries(Kenya) and may you live to c that.....-also we may strike our oil soon-we are not afraid...we are up to the challenge ..keep on complaining and remember too much wishful thinking is dangerous to your mind
     
  17. m

    moyo JF-Expert Member

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    too late for you
     
  18. n

    nomasana JF-Expert Member

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    i couldn't have said it better

    this thing will never take off, simply because Kenya holds the trump card due to its location and the proposed lamu port, which should start getting built by mid next year. this makes the Tanzania-Uganda corridor a very unattractive venture.

    but if it is competition want then, bring it. we(Kenyans) thrive on that stuff

    geza, Uganda's oil can only be an asset for Kenya whichever way you look at it. plus if Uganda descides not to "give" us their oil then we have Kenya's 48th county, we call it south Sudan(and they have ALOT OF OIL)
     
  19. G

    Geza Ulole JF-Expert Member

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    The way you talk of Lamu port as if you have secured funds already...a truly one's nation obsessed view! Since your independence have you ever added even a km (let's say an inch) of that dilapilated lunatic railway by British colonialists to brag that you (Kenyans) strike at opportunities !? Grow up boy to a reality...BTW Uganda's affair is my issue since we belong to the same block so collectively acting together against your sick mind as people..
     
  20. Pdraze

    Pdraze JF-Expert Member

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    Im in doubt with the EAC living condition in the near future cause some of the factors lead to its collapse in 1977 still exist,selfishness,greedy
     
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