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IPC endorses Besigye for third battle with Museveni

Discussion in 'Ugandan News and Politics' started by ByaseL, Sep 1, 2010.

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    ByaseL JF-Expert Member

    Sep 1, 2010
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    Forum for Democratic Change President Dr Kizza Besigye was yesterday endorsed as a joint opposition flag bearer to lead the four parties to challenge President Museveni in 2011. Dr Besigye who has twice lost to Museveni was presented to delegates of his party, the FDC, Justice Forum Party, Conservative Party and Social Democratic Party at Namboole Stadium.

    An earlier anticipated contest for the opposition flag bearer did not take place after the leaders reached consensus during a Monday meeting held in Kampala. A team led by Professor Dani Nabudere, Professors Frederic Jjuuko, John Jean Barya and retired Bishop Balagadde Ssekadde brokered the deal that saw the other contenders; Hussein Kyanjo of Jeema, CP’s Prof James Kigongo and SDP’s Michael Mabikke offer to support Dr Besigye.

    “I am persuaded that what we are doing is a directive from the people of Uganda who, for a long time, have demanded that their leaders should unite,” Dr Besigye said. “…. Those who wish the IPC dead should pray for a long time for themselves because they may not live to see that happen.”

    The FDC leader sought to reassure opposition supporters that he can be an electable candidate on the third attempt. “I pray that we all appreciate that pushing a dictatorship from power is a challenging situation and it is not one man’s mission,” Dr Besigye said. “It is true that our share of votes have been rising while those of Mr Museveni have been falling, and I am sure that in the next elections if nobody has told government this, then they should be told that they have six months to pack their bags.”

    Dr Besigye took 29 per cent of the vote in 2001 when he stood under the Reform Agenda pressure group, and 37 per cent in 2006 when he stood under the FDC. The Supreme Court found widespread irregularities in both elections but ruled, in 2006, that these were not substantial enough to change the outcome of the result. He extended an olive branch to the Uganda People’s Congress and the Democratic Party, the two parties that pulled out of the coalition, citing lack of focus