Dismiss Notice
You are browsing this site as a guest. It takes 2 minutes to CREATE AN ACCOUNT and less than 1 minute to LOGIN

Guinea President dies..Military Takes Over!!!!

Discussion in 'International Forum' started by MwanaHabari, Dec 23, 2008.

  1. MwanaHabari

    MwanaHabari JF-Expert Member

    #1
    Dec 23, 2008
    Joined: Nov 9, 2006
    Messages: 444
    Likes Received: 0
    Trophy Points: 0
    President of Guinea, Lansana Conte, has died, aged 74.

    He had ruled the West African country with an iron fist since 1984, when he took power after a bloodless coup, only the country's second president.

    The precise circumstances of his death are not yet known, but he had been suffering from diabetes. He was also a chain smoker.

    National Assembly Speaker Aboubacar Sompare announced the death in a late-night statement on state television.

    "We regret to announce to the people of Guinea the death of General Lansana Conte, after a long illness, at 1845" (on Monday), Mr Sompare was quoted by the AFP news agency as saying.

    Prime Minister Ahmed Tidiane Souare and chief of staff of the armed forces General Diarra Camara confirmed the news.

    As speaker, Mr Sompare will now take over as president for 60 days during which time a presidential election should be held.

    Three times elected

    President Conte came to power in 1984 at the head of a military coup to fill the power vacuum that had been left by the sudden death of his predecessor, Sekou Toure, who'd been president since independence from France in 1958.

    He oversaw a return to civilian rule and was elected three times.

    He followed a political path familiar to some of the old school of African leaders, says the BBC World Affairs correspondent Mark Doyle, when he dabbled with democracy but then appeared to change his mind.

    He let some political parties operate but intimidated or jailed other opposition leaders.

    During his time in power Lansana Conte held his country together despite the maelstrom of wars in neighbouring states including Sierra Leone, Liberia and Ivory Coast.

    But Guinea, a country of eight million people that is rich in minerals and blessed with fertile soil, never really reached its economic potential.

    And repression under President Conte meant that Guinea couldn't join the new generation of African states which could boast political pluralism, our correspondent notes.

    There is no obvious successor to him as president.
     
    Last edited: Dec 23, 2008
  2. Shadow

    Shadow JF-Expert Member

    #2
    Dec 23, 2008
    Joined: May 19, 2008
    Messages: 2,890
    Likes Received: 57
    Trophy Points: 145
    Utawatesa wananchi wako, Utawadhulumu na utawaibia lakini mwisho wa siku Israeli anakushukia kama tai!!

    Guinea's hardline president dies

    [​IMG]

    Conte took power in 1984


    The President of Guinea, Lansana Conte, has died, aged 74.

    He had ruled the West African country with an iron fist since 1984, when he took power after a bloodless coup, only the country's second president.

    The precise circumstances of his death are not yet known, but he had been suffering from diabetes. He was also a chain smoker.

    National Assembly Speaker Aboubacar Sompare announced the death in a late-night statement on state television.

    "We regret to announce to the people of Guinea the death of General Lansana Conte, after a long illness, at 1845" (on Monday), Mr Sompare said.

    The president "hid his physical suffering in order to give happiness to Guinea," he went on.

    Prime Minister Ahmed Tidiane Souare and chief of staff of the armed forces General Diarra Camara confirmed the news.

    As speaker, Mr Sompare will now take over as president for 60 days during which time a presidential election should be held.

    Three times elected

    President Conte came to power in 1984 at the head of a military coup to fill the power vacuum that had been left by the sudden death of his predecessor, Sekou Toure, who'd been president since independence from France in 1958.

    He oversaw a return to civilian rule and was elected three times.

    He followed a political path familiar to some of the old school of African leaders, says the BBC World Affairs correspondent Mark Doyle, when he dabbled with democracy but then appeared to change his mind.

    He let some political parties operate but intimidated or jailed other opposition leaders.

    During his time in power Lansana Conte held his country together despite the maelstrom of wars in neighbouring states including Sierra Leone, Liberia and Ivory Coast.

    But Guinea, a country of eight million people that is rich in minerals and blessed with fertile soil, never really reached its economic potential.

    And repression under President Conte meant that Guinea couldn't join the new generation of African states which could boast political pluralism, our correspondent notes.

    There is no obvious successor to him as president.

    BBC NEWS | Africa | Guinea's hardline president dies
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 23, 2008
  3. Z

    Zungu Pule JF-Expert Member

    #3
    Dec 23, 2008
    Joined: Mar 7, 2008
    Messages: 1,550
    Likes Received: 167
    Trophy Points: 160
    Nina wasiwasi, katika jitihada za kumpata mrithi wa Conte, Guinea-Conakry inaweza kujikuta kwenye machafuko.
     
  4. Lole Gwakisa

    Lole Gwakisa JF-Expert Member

    #4
    Dec 23, 2008
    Joined: Nov 5, 2008
    Messages: 3,813
    Likes Received: 195
    Trophy Points: 160
    will anybody miss him?good riddance! that includes all dictators in Africa
     
  5. Ab-Titchaz

    Ab-Titchaz Content Manager Staff Member

    #5
    Dec 23, 2008
    Joined: Jan 30, 2008
    Messages: 14,702
    Likes Received: 15
    Trophy Points: 0
    ...I second that.

    ...Now the succession nightmare that is typical of African
    dictators who do not groom successors is about to begin.

    I can bet that another dictator is spoiling for the seat.
     
  6. I

    Iga Senior Member

    #6
    Dec 23, 2008
    Joined: Dec 17, 2007
    Messages: 112
    Likes Received: 1
    Trophy Points: 0
    Lord, have mercy on Zimbabweans, why not also make hurry in calling the Hitler Mussolini rolled into one, Robert Mugabe asap!
     
  7. M

    Mwanjelwa JF-Expert Member

    #7
    Dec 23, 2008
    Joined: Jul 29, 2007
    Messages: 962
    Likes Received: 12
    Trophy Points: 35
    I have many Guinean friends here who are very happy after the news broke out!. However, they are not sure who the successor will be! Furthermore, the late president gave too much power to the army. No one is sure of what is next for Guinea. a sleeping African giant.
     
  8. Ab-Titchaz

    Ab-Titchaz Content Manager Staff Member

    #8
    Dec 23, 2008
    Joined: Jan 30, 2008
    Messages: 14,702
    Likes Received: 15
    Trophy Points: 0
    That happiness is too shortsighted kwa sababu hii....

    Military takes control in Guinea


    [​IMG]

    Guinea's army has announced that it has dissolved the country's government and suspended the constitution, hours after the death of President Lansana Conte.

    In a state radio statement, Capt Moussa Dadis Camara said a "consultative council" of civilian and military leaders would be set up in their place.

    State institutions were "incapable of resolving the crises which have been confronting the country", he said.

    Mr Conte had ruled the West African country with an iron fist since 1984.

    The precise circumstances of the president's death are not yet known, but he had been suffering from diabetes.

    Prime Minister Ahmed Souare earlier appealed for calm and declared 40 days of national mourning.


    BBC NEWS | Africa | Military takes control in Guinea
     
  9. M

    MzalendoHalisi JF-Expert Member

    #9
    Dec 23, 2008
    Joined: Jun 24, 2007
    Messages: 3,842
    Likes Received: 91
    Trophy Points: 145
    Ameacha legacy mbaya!

    Mugabe will for sure miss him!
     
  10. BAK

    BAK JF-Expert Member

    #10
    Dec 23, 2008
    Joined: Feb 11, 2007
    Messages: 50,060
    Likes Received: 9,770
    Trophy Points: 280
    Military 'seizes power' in Guinea
    BBC News Online

    Many analysts had predicted the army would take over after Mr Conte died
    A Guinea army statement has announced the dissolution of the government, after President Lansana Conte's death.

    An army officer said on state radio a "consultative council" of civilian and military chiefs would be set up. The EU and African Union condemned the move.

    All ministers and other top officials have been summoned to the main military camp "to guarantee their security".

    But Guinea Prime Minister Ahmed Tidiane Souare said the government "continues to function as it should".

    And National Assembly Speaker Aboubacar Sompare, the constitutional successor, told French television there had been an attempted rebellion but he did not think all the military was behind it.

    'Long illness'

    He announced earlier that President Conte, who ruled the West African country with an iron fist for 24 years, had died after a "long illness". Forty days of national mourning have been declared.

    The precise circumstances of his death are unknown, but Mr Conte was a chain-smoker and diabetic. It is also believed he had been suffering from leukaemia.

    BBC West Africa correspondent Will Ross says it is important to see whether the army is united on the way forward for Guinea, as a power struggle could be extremely dangerous given the deep ethnic divisions there.

    Guinea's neighbours - Liberia, Sierra Leone and Ivory Coast - are enjoying relative stability after years of conflict and there are fears any unrest there could spread and embroil the sub-region in fighting once more.

    'Stay at home'

    Only hours after the announcement of the president's death, a junior army officer went on state radio to say the army had taken over, and a body called the National Council for Democracy and Development (CNDD) set up.


    Lansana Conte seized power in 1984 and won three controversial elections


    Obituary: Guinea's Lansana Conte

    "As of today, the constitution is suspended as well as political and union activity," said Capt Moussa Dadis Camara. "The government and the institutions of the republic have been dissolved."

    Capt Camara, who is head of the army's fuel supplies unit, said an interim council would be set up to root out corruption and organise fair elections.

    Announcers said the officer was speaking on behalf of the entire military, although this has not been independently confirmed.

    A later statement by the CNDD told ministers to present themselves at the Alpha Yaya Diallo military camp "to guarantee their security". It also ordered people not to loot and to stay at home.

    "Public assemblies are formally forbidden," it added.

    Soldiers have set up check-points along the main roads into the city centre, but so far there have been no reports of them being heavy-handed or harassing people

    BBC correspondent Alhassan Sillah, Conakry

    Fear in Guinea at army takeover

    African Union peace and security commissioner Ramtane Lamamra told the AFP news agency: "If the army coup is confirmed, it is a flagrant violation of the constitution and of African legality."

    Former colonial power France - in its capacity as the current holder of the European Union's rotating six-month presidency - said it would oppose any attempted putsch in Guinea and called for free and transparent elections.

    The BBC's Alhassan Sillah in the capital, Conakry, said soldiers have set up check-points along the main roads into the city centre, but so far there have been no reports of them being heavy-handed.

    Vehicles checked

    Vehicles are checked briefly and waved through, he says.


    HAVE YOUR SAY We need a change, change that will benefit all Guineans. We pray for a good leader
    Amara, Nzerekore
    Send us your commentsEarlier, the leader of the Union for the Progress of Guinea and the secretary of the opposition alliance, Frad, Jean-Marie Dore, called for a peaceful transition of power.

    Veteran opposition leader Alpha Konde returned to Guinea on Sunday after 15 months of self-imposed exile in France. He left Guinea after being released from jail.

    According to the constitution the National Assembly speaker should be in charge until a presidential election is held within 60 days.

    The BBC's Will Ross says many analysts had predicted the army would try to take over following Mr Conte's death because he had been increasingly relying on it to shore up his oppressive rule.


    Despite Guinea's mineral wealth, it is one of West Africa's poorest nations

    General Conte came to power in 1984 at the head of a military coup to fill the vacuum left by the sudden death of his predecessor, Sekou Toure, who had been president since independence from France in 1958.

    He eventually oversaw a return to civilian rule and was elected three times, although critics said the votes were never free or fair.

    As his health declined over the last five years, it was often unclear who was in charge and the government barely functioned, our correspondent says.

    Although Guinea's mineral wealth makes it potentially one of Africa's richest countries, its population of about 10 million is among the poorest in the region.
     
  11. Bongolander

    Bongolander JF-Expert Member

    #11
    Dec 23, 2008
    Joined: Jul 10, 2007
    Messages: 4,880
    Likes Received: 23
    Trophy Points: 135
    I was about to say,for the first time the year has passed without African militaries meddling with politics in Africa. The Guineas soldiers have proved me wrong.
     
  12. Ladslaus Modest

    Ladslaus Modest JF-Expert Member

    #12
    Dec 23, 2008
    Joined: Jun 27, 2008
    Messages: 638
    Likes Received: 3
    Trophy Points: 35
    Guinea's president, Lansana Conte, dies

    By ABOU BAKR and RUKMINI CALLIMACHI – 11 hours ago

    CONAKRY, Guinea (AP) — Guinea President Lansana Conte, who has ruled the African nation with an iron hand since seizing power in a coup nearly a quarter century ago, has died following a lengthy illness, the National Assembly president said Tuesday.

    Aboubacar Sompare, flanked by the country's prime minister and the head of the army, said on state-run television that Conte died Monday evening. He was believed to be in his 70s but the government has never disclosed his birth date.

    "I have the heavy duty of informing the people of Guinea of the death of Gen. Lansana Conte following a long illness," said Sompare. He did not provide a specific cause of death or elaborate on the type of illness.

    Sompare said that for many years Conte "hid his physical suffering in order to give happiness to Guinea."

    Conte was one of the last members of a dwindling group of so-called "African Big Men" who came to power by the gun and resisted the democratic tide sweeping the continent.

    He seized power in a military coup a week after the 1984 death of Ahmed Sekou Toure, Guinea's first president after gaining independence from France in 1958. Conte's official biography described the action as "an operation to safeguard and maintain peace in the country."

    Conte quickly established himself as the sole leader of the military junta. He abandoned Toure's revolutionary socialist agenda, but like his predecessor, suppressed dissent.

    As a post-Cold War democracy wave swept Africa, Conte formed a political party and in 1993 won the country's first multi-party presidential election. He was re-elected in 1998 and 2003, though the opposition rejected the elections, protesting that they were flawed.

    Guineau's 10 million people are among the poorest in the world, even though the nation holds half the world's reserves of bauxite, the ore used to make aluminum. It exported food at independence, but corruption, inflation and high unemployment made it more impoverished, it had to begin importing food.

    According to the Constitution, the head of the national assembly becomes president in the case of the death of the head of state. But transfers of power have rarely been smooth in Guinea, which has been crippled by corruption and rocked by multiple coups.

    Prime Minister Ahmed Tidiane Souare called on the army to secure the nation's borders, while Sompare directed the country's courts to apply the law.

    The two announcements, coupled by the presence of the head of the army, appeared to be an effort to signal that the government intended a peaceful transition.

    The most serious recent challenge to Conte's rule came two years ago as demonstrators called for him to step down and Guinea descended into chaos.

    Conte responded by declaring martial law and sent tanks into the capital streets. Security forces killed dozens of demonstrators.

    Conte's health and his undisclosed illness has been an issue of national debate for years. Rumors of his death surfaced periodically, including in 2003 when he was forced to go on TV to deny them.

    Such rumors flared earlier this month when Conte failed to make his usual televised appearance on Tabaski, an important Muslim holiday. The prime minister and others appeared in his place, but people were on edge and numerous businesses shuttered their doors to protect against possible unrest.

    Last week, the editor of a local paper was arrested after publishing a picture of the frail leader struggling to stand up. A spokesman for the president went on TV to assure the nation that Conte was not ill.

    The newspaper was ordered to print a photograph of Conte, showing him in good health.

    Callimachi contributed to this report from Dakar, Senegal.
     

    Attached Files:

  13. Ab-Titchaz

    Ab-Titchaz Content Manager Staff Member

    #13
    Dec 25, 2008
    Joined: Jan 30, 2008
    Messages: 14,702
    Likes Received: 15
    Trophy Points: 0
    Thousands Greet Guinea Coup Chief


    [​IMG]

    Capt Moussa Dadis Camara

    Thousands of Guineans have gone on to the streets of the capital to welcome the leader of a coup that followed the death of the country's president.

    The junior army officer who led the coup, Capt Moussa Dadis Camara, told journalists he was now "president of the republic", AFP news agency reports.

    He has declared an overnight curfew throughout the country.

    A regional delegation is due in Guinea on Thursday to encourage a return to constitutional rule.

    The group, Ecowas, has condemned the coup, as has the African Union.

    "Ecowas cannot accept military imposition on the people of Guinea," said Mohammed Ibn Chambers, one of the delegation's members.

    Earlier, government leaders insisted they were still in power and called for help from the international community.

    But BBC West Africa correspondent Will Ross says the coup leaders now appear to be in control and to enjoy considerable public support.

    President Lansana Conte, 74, died on Monday night and renegade soldiers moved to seize power in the hours afterwards, taking control of state radio and television.

    The funeral of Mr Conte is to take place on Friday in his home village.

    'Destabilising'

    The BBC's Alhassan Sillah in the capital, Conakry, said that shortly after Capt Camara was named as president of the new junta, a large convoy of soldiers, policemen and firemen took to the streets in a large motorcade. We have no intention of bringing in mercenaries

    He said tens of thousands of people had come out to cheer and applaud them, shouting: "Welcome to this change; welcome to this change!"

    The convoy moved through the streets unopposed.

    "I came to see if the terrain is favourable to us," Capt Camara was quoted as saying. "I see that it is."

    In his first press conference, the army captain said there was a big movement of support for the coup, AFP reported.

    "I am convinced, reassured that I am the president of the republic, the head of the (junta's) National Council for Democracy and Development (CNDD)," he said.

    Earlier, the CNDD announced a curfew from 2000 to 0600.

    The coup leaders also warned forces loyal to the government against using mercenaries to restore themselves to power.

    "I would like to inform the people of Guinea that there are generals who for unknown reasons are trying to recruit mercenaries - some of whom are already inside our borders - for the purpose of destabilising our attempts to establish peace and democracy," Capt Camara said.

    His statement followed a call by the parliament speaker, Aboubacar Sompare, for the international community to intervene.

    According to Guinea's constitution, Mr Sompare should be in charge of the government until elections are held in 60 days.

    'Idiotic'

    The country's prime minister, Ahmed Tidiane Souare, has insisted the government, protected by loyal troops, is still the legitimate authority.

    He rejected the coup leaders' claims that mercenaries could be used.

    "We are still in control and we are trying to normalise the situation. We have no intention of bringing in mercenaries. In fact, we haven't even asked our own armed forces to intervene."

    Capt Camara said the new ruling council replacing the government and other institutions would hold "free, credible and transparent elections" in December 2010, when President Conte's term would have ended.

    "The council has no ambitions to hold on to power. The only reason is the need to safeguard territorial integrity. That is the only reason. There is no ulterior motive," he said.

    Mr Conte died on Monday night after a "long illness".

    The cause of his death is unknown, but Mr Conte was a chain-smoker and diabetic who is also believed to have suffered from leukaemia.

    The European Union and United States have joined the African Union in condemning of the coup.


    BBC NEWS | Africa | Thousands greet Guinea coup chief
     
  14. Ab-Titchaz

    Ab-Titchaz Content Manager Staff Member

    #14
    Dec 25, 2008
    Joined: Jan 30, 2008
    Messages: 14,702
    Likes Received: 15
    Trophy Points: 0
    [​IMG]

    Thousands of people have turned out in the Guinean capital, Conakry, to welcome soldiers supporting a coup that followed the death of President Lansana Conte.

    [​IMG]

    A junior army officer, Captain Moussa Dadis Camara, has been declared head of a council replacing the government. But the government has insisted it is still in power


    [​IMG]

    Coup leaders have claimed that forces loyal to the government are plotting a return to power, while government leaders have appealed for the international community to intervene.

    [​IMG]

    Correspondents say it is important to see whether the army is united, since any power struggle could be extremely dangerous given Guinea's ethnic divisions.
     
Loading...