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Types of Poems

Discussion in 'Jukwaa la Lugha' started by Roulette, Oct 19, 2011.

  1. Roulette

    Roulette JF-Expert Member

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    Oct 19, 2011
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    [FONT=&amp]A Diamante is a seven-lined contrast poem set up in a diamond shape. The first line begins with a noun/subject, and second line contains two adjectives that describe the beginning noun. The third line contains three words ending in -ing relating to the noun/subject. The forth line contains two words that describe the noun/subject and two that describe the closing synonym/antonym. If using an antonym for the ending, this is where the shift should occur. In the fifth line are three more -ing words describing the ending antonym/synonym, and the sixth are two more adjectives describing the ending antonym/synonym. The last line ends with the first noun's antonym or synonym.To make it a bit simpler, here is an example (I made it for a friend I miss, so if you know more about Diamante, please correct me)
    [/FONT]

    [FONT=&amp]


    Friendship
    [/FONT]
    [FONT=&amp]Admiration, excitement
    [/FONT]
    [FONT=&amp]Supporting, caring, sharing
    [/FONT]
    [FONT=&amp]Complicity, discussions, differences ,frustration
    [/FONT]
    [FONT=&amp]withdrawing, hiding, Crying,
    [/FONT]
    [FONT=&amp]isolation, boredom
    [/FONT]
    [FONT=&amp]loneliness[/FONT]
     
  2. SHERRIF ARPAIO

    SHERRIF ARPAIO JF-Expert Member

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    Oct 19, 2011
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    Well written.
    My 2 cents!!
     
  3. Roulette

    Roulette JF-Expert Member

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    The diamante has the advantage of highlighting the contrast in a dynamic situation. you can see in my example how I went from excitement of having a friend to the sadness of losing one, which is even worse than when I did not have a friend at all. well, i don't know if it is captured here but the reader needs to see that. you can also focus on analogy of two words, like start with friendship and end with love, which will give the reader, in few word an idea of how the relation, or feeling evolved, and was concluded in an analogy between the first and the last word.
    It would be interesting to write one starting with the word CCM and ending with the word that defines what they are today, highlighting their raise and shine and thereafter their decline.
    Anyone who wants to try?
     
  4. Roulette

    Roulette JF-Expert Member

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    Another good poem that is original although not very common is the Eprigram.
    Epigrams are short satirical poems ending with either a humorous retort or a stinging punchline. Used mainly as expressions of social criticism or political satire, the most common forms are written as a couplet: a pair of rhymed lines in the same meter. The term epigram is derived from the Greek word 'epigramma' meaning inscription. The epigram was cultivated in the late sixteenth and seventeenth centuries
    Practioners of this poetic expression include John Dunne, Ben Jonson, William Blake and Robert Frost. Here is a model of epigram:

    I wonder who is to blame,
    between the wife and the mistress,
    Coz the one carries the shame,
    because the other is so careless.


    Epigram are not always very grammatical, they should be easily understandable and not too philosophical. I have picked this example to make a bit a fool of myself and to poke all my friends who supported my position in the post "Jibu kwa The Boss (Nyumba ndogo)". If we can't get over it, we better laugh about it.
     
  5. Roulette

    Roulette JF-Expert Member

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    Triolets:A Triolet is a poetic form consisting of only 8 lines. Within a Triolet, the 1st, 4th, and 7th lines repeat, and the 2nd and 8th lines do as well. The rhyme scheme is simple: ABaAabAB, capital letters representing the repeated lines.Make writing a Triolet more challenging! Make each line 8 syllables in length (4 metrical feet), written in iambic tetrameter (the more common way), or try it in pentameter (English version) where each line only has 10 syllables(5 metrical feet):I could not make a triolet, here is an example from Shadow Poetry -- A World of Poetry at Your Fingertips
    Example #1:
    My Heart Residing in Thy Chest
    In response to Shelly's, "The Indian Serenade".

    For, break it shall and so it must
    My heart residing in thy chest
    When placed in care of lover's trust
    For, break it shall and so it must
    Passion's ashes returned to dust
    This lonely heart is laid to rest
    For, break it shall and so it must
    My heart residing in thy chest

    Copyright © 2003 Dan Tharp

    I will try to make a triolet and post it in response to this post... not easy though, now that I think about it...
     
  6. The Boss

    The Boss JF-Expert Member

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    this is very interesting...
     
  7. The Boss

    The Boss JF-Expert Member

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    this is very interesting..lol

    the mistress is innocent lol

     
  8. Roulette

    Roulette JF-Expert Member

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    Oct 24, 2011
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    Yaani despite all the efforts I put to illustrate how an epigram looks like, all you have to say is that the mistress is innocent? aliekuloga amesha fariki, it can't be undone now...lol
     
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