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Ministerial Code (United Kingdom) . WHY CANT JK COPY AND PASTE THIS

Discussion in 'International Forum' started by Mtazamaji, Dec 24, 2010.

  1. Mtazamaji

    Mtazamaji JF-Expert Member

    Dec 24, 2010
    Joined: Feb 29, 2008
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    Jk na serikali yake wanaweza kuleta mabdiliko kwa kuiga hawa wenzetu wanavyofanya.

    Article hii inaeleza miongozo maadili, inayotakiwa kufutwa na mawaziri wa UK

    Nimechukua vipengele vitatuniliyooona kama serikaliya JK JK ikijaribu kuiga japo kwa mwaka 1ja tutaona mabadiliko mazuri

    Section 6 – Ministers' Constituency and Party Interests

    Ministers' Constituency and Party Interests directs ministers to refrain from using government property and resources in their role as an MP. For example, political leaflets must not be distributed at the expense of public funds. Ministers with a conflict of interest between their government role and their constituency (for example, a transport minister may have to balance the desire of his constituents not to have a new airport built near their town, with his government duties) are simply advised to act cautiously; "ministers are advised to take particular care."

    Section 7 – Ministers' Private Interests

    This section requires ministers to provide their Permanent Secretary with a complete list of any financial interests they have. In March 2009, this list was released to the public for the first time.[10] It is collated and made available by the Cabinet Office.[11] Officials sometimes need to restrict "interested" ministers' access to certain papers, in order to ensure impartiality.
    Guidelines are set out as to maintaining neutrality for ministers who are members of a trade union. No minister should accept gifts or hospitality from any person or organisation when a conflict of interest could arise. A list of gifts, and how they were dealt with on an individual basis, is published annually.[12]

    Section 10 – Travel by Ministers

    Official government transport, paid for by public funds, should normally only be used on government business, except where security requires that it be used even for personal transport. All travel should be cost-effective, and any trips abroad should be kept as small as possible. All overseas delegations costing more than £500 have their details published, annually.[12] Members of the Cabinet have the authority to order special (non-scheduled) flights, but this power should only be used when necessary. In the event of a minister being summoned home on urgent government business, the cost of the round trip will be paid for from public funds. There are also rules relating to the use of official cars, and air miles gained by official travel.

    Annex – The Seven Principles of Public Life

    These principles were published by the Committee on Standards in Public Life in 1995.[13]

    • Selflessness: ministers should act entirely in the public interest.
    • Integrity: no financial obligations should be accepted if they could undermine the minister's position.
    • Objectivity: when making appointments, decisions should be based on merit.
    • Accountability: all public office-holders are accountable, and should co-operate with all scrutiny procedures.
    • Openness: all decisions should be justified, and information should be restricted only when necessary for the public interest.
    • Honesty: public office-holders are required, by duty, to be honest in all their dealings and business.
    • Leadership: the principles should be supported and upheld by leadership and example.
    Ministerial Code (United Kingdom) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    NB:Semina Elekezi hiyo teh teh
  2. Mallaba

    Mallaba JF-Expert Member

    Dec 24, 2010
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    hii nimeipenda sana, sio serikali ya kishikaji tu.
    Objectivity: when making appointments, decisions should be based on merit