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Discussion in 'Nafasi za Kazi na Tenda' started by zomba, Feb 24, 2008.

  1. zomba

    zomba JF-Expert Member

    #1
    Feb 24, 2008
    Joined: Nov 27, 2007
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    JOB TOOLS

    Tough Questions and Answers
    Ok, you're in the interview and you are prepared to talk about your past job experiences. Then, the interviewer starts to ask more general and maybe, uncomfortable questions. Here are some of those questions and things to think about BEFORE you go to interview!


    1. Tell me a story about yourself.
    2. Why are you leaving your current position?
    3. What do you consider your most significant accomplishments?
    4. Why do you believe that you are qualified for this position?
    5. Have you ever accomplished something you didn't think you could?
    6. What do you like/dislike most about your current position?
    7. How do you handle pressure? Do you like or dislike these situations?
    8. The sign of a good employee is the ability to take the initiative. Can you describe situations like this about yourself?
    9. What's the worst or most embarrassing aspect of your business career? How would you have done things differently now with 20/20 hindsight?
    10. How have you grown or changed over the past few years?
    11. What do you consider your most significant strengths?
    12. What do you consider your most significant weaknesses?
    13. Deadlines, frustrations, difficult people, and silly rules can make a job difficult. How do you handle these types of situations?
    14. One of our biggest problems is ________. What has been your experience with this? How would you deal with it?
    15. How do you compare your technical skills to your management skills?
    16. How has your technical ability been important in accomplishing results?
    17. How would you handle a situation with tight deadlines, low employee morale, and inadequate resources?
    18. Are you satisfied with your career to date? What would you change if you could?
    19. What are your career goals? Where do you see yourself five years from now? Ten years?
    20. What do you think of your last boss? Favorite boss? Least favorite boss?
    21. What is your energy level like? Describe a typical day?
    22. How do you take direction? How do you take criticism?
    23. Why should we hire you for this position? What contribution would you make? [​IMG]

    1. Tell me a story about yourself.
    Just talk for 2 minutes. Be logical. Start anywhere, e.g. high school, college or first position. The interviewer is looking for communication skills, linear thinking. Also try to score a point or two (describe a major personal attribute.

    [​IMG]

    2. Why are you leaving your current position?
    This is a very critical question. Don't "bad mouth" your previous employer. Don't sound too opportunistic. Some description could be major problems, buy-out, or shut-down. It is also good to state that 'after a long personal consideration your chance to make a contribution is very low due to company changes.

    [​IMG]

    3. What do you consider your most significant accomplishments?
    This can get you the job. Prepare extensively. Score points. Tell a 2 minute story, with details and discuss your personal involvement. Make the accomplishment worth achieving. Discuss hard work, long hours, pressure, important company issues at stake.

    [​IMG]

    4. Why do you believe that you are qualified for this position?
    Pick two or three main factors about the job and about you that are most relevant. Discuss for two minutes, with specific details. Select a technical skill, a specific management skill (organizing, staffing, planning), and a personal success attribute to mention.

    [​IMG]

    5. Have you ever accomplished something you didn't think you could?
    Interviewer is trying to determine your goal orientation, work ethic, personal commitment, and integrity. Provide a good example where you overcame number difficulties to succeed. Prove you're not a quitter, and that you'll get going when the going gets tough.

    [​IMG]

    6. What do you like/dislike most about your current position?
    Interviewer is trying to determine compatibility with open position. If you have interest in the position be careful. Stating you dislike overtime or getting into the details, or that you like management can cost you the position. There is nothing wrong with liking challenges, pressure situations, opportunities to grow, or dislike for bureaucracy or frustrating situations.

    [​IMG]

    7. How do you handle pressure? Do you like or dislike these situations?
    High achievers tend to perform well in high pressure situations. Conversely, questions also could imply that position is pressure packed and out of control. There is nothing wrong with this as long as you know what you're getting into. If you do perform well under stress, provide a good example with details, giving an overview of the stress situation. Let the interviewer "feel" the stress by your description of it.

    [​IMG]

    8. The sign of a good employee is the ability to take the initiative. Can you describe situations like this about yourself?
    A pro-active, results oriented person doesn't have to be told what to do. This is one of the major success attributes. To convince the interviewer you possess this trait you must give a series of short examples describing your self motivation. Try to discuss at least one in detail. The extra effort, strong work ethic and creative side of you must be demonstrated.

    [​IMG]

    9. What's the worst or most embarassing aspect of your business career? How would you have done things differently now with 20/20 hindsight?
    This is a general question to learn how introspective you are, also to see if you can learn from your mistakes. If you can, it indicates an open, more flexible personality. Don't be afraid to talk about your failures, particularly if you've learned from them. This is a critical aspect of high potential individuals.

    [​IMG]

    10. How have you grown or changed over the past few years?
    This requires thought. Maturation, increased technical skills, or increase self-confidence are important aspects of human development. To discuss this effectively is indicative of a well-balanced, intelligent individual. Overcoming personal obstacles, or recognizing manageable weaknesses can brand you as an approachable and desirable employee.

    [​IMG]

    11. What do you consider your most significant strengths?
    Be prepared. Know your four or five key strengths. Be able to discuss each with a specific example. Select those attributes that are most compatible with the job opening. Most people say "management" or "good interpersonal skills" in answer to this. Don't use this unless you can describe the specific characteristics of management (planning, organizing, results, staffing, etc.) or how your relationship skills have proven critical to your success.

    [​IMG]

    12. What do you consider your most significant weaknesses?
    Don't reveal deep character flaws. Rather discuss tolerable faults, that you are working towards improving. Show by specific example how this has changed over time. Better still, show how a weakness can be turned into a strength. For example, how a concentration on details results in higher quality work even though it requires overtime.

    [​IMG]

    13. Deadlines, frustrations, difficult people, and silly rules can make a job difficult. How do you handle these types of situations?
    Most companies, unfortunately, face these types of problems daily. If you can't deal with petty frustrations, you'll be seen as a problem. You certainly can state your displeasure at the petty side of these issues, but how you overcome them is important. Diplomacy, perseverance, and common-sense can often prevail even in difficult circumstances. This is part of corporate America, and you must be able to deal with it on a regular basis.

    [​IMG]

    14. One of our biggest problems is ________. What has been your experience with this? How would you deal with it?
    Think on your feet. Ask questions to get details. Break it into sub-sections. Highly likely you have some experience with sub-sections. Answer these, and summarize the total. State how you would go about solving the problem, if you can't answer directly. Be specific. Show your organizational and analytical skills.

    [​IMG]

    15. How do you compare your technical skills to your management skills?
    Many people tend to minimize their technical skills, either because they don't have any, or they don't like getting into the details. Most successful managers possess good technical skills and don't get into enough detail to make sure they understand the information being presented by their group. Try for a good balance here if you want to be seriously considered for the position.

    [​IMG]

    16. How has your technical ability been important in accomplishing results?
    Clearly the interviewer believes he needs a strong level of technical competence. Most strong managers have good technical backgrounds, even if they have gotten away from the details. Describe specific examples of your technical where with all, but don't be afraid to say you are not current. Also, you could give examples of how you resolve a technical issue by "accelerated research."

    [​IMG]

    17. How would you handle a situation with tight deadlines, low employee morale, and inadequate resources?
    If you pull this off effectively, it indicates you have strong management skills. Need to be creative. An example would be great. Relate your toughest management task, even if it doesn't meet all the criteria. Most situation don't. Organizational skills, interpersonal skills, and handling pressure are key elements of effective management. Good managers should be able to address each issue, even if they are not concurrent. Deftly handling the question is pretty indicative of your skills.

    [​IMG]

    18. Are you satisfied with your career to date? What would you change if you could?
    Be honest. Interviewer wants to know if he can keep you happy. It's important to know if you're willing to make some sacrifices to get your career on the right track. Degree of motivation is an important selection criteria.

    [​IMG]

    19. What are your career goals? Where do you see yourself five years from now? Ten years?
    Most importantly, be realistic! Blue sky stuff brands you as immature. One or two management jumps in three to five years is a reasonable goal. If your track indicates you're on line for senior management in ten years, it's okay to mention. However, if you've have a rocky road, better to be introspective.

    [​IMG]

    20. What do you think of your last boss? Favorite boss? Least favorite boss?
    Realize that complainers are recognized as potential trouble-makers. Keep your answer short, sweet and move-on. "I like him as an individual and respect him professionally and I learned a great deal." Do not elaborate further. Find a growth opportunity in any situation.

    [​IMG]

    21. What is your energy level like? Describe a typical day?
    Demonstrate good use of time, include planning in advance and that review of your performance helps you reach your desired goals.

    [​IMG]

    22. How do you take direction? How do you take criticism?
    The preferred situation is when a manager can provide fully detailed directions. Remember that managers have a larger agenda, which might not be shared. Learning what signals could have been recognized earlier is preferred to taking offense to criticism.

    [​IMG]

    23. Why should we hire you for this position? What contribution would you make?
    Good chance to summarize. By now you know the key problems. Re-state and show how you would address. Relate to specific attributes and specific accomplishments. Qualify responses with the need to gather information. Don't be cocky. Demonstrate a thoughtful, organized, strong effort kind of attitude.


    [​IMG]

    source: http://insightcompanies.com/toughqna.html
     
  2. L

    Lizy JF-Expert Member

    #2
    Feb 24, 2008
    Joined: Feb 11, 2008
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    Qn 2: Why are you leaving your current position?

    Jitahidi usiongelee maslahi kabisa (though inaweza kuwa kweli ni sababu ya maslahi). Talk more about your caree (in positive way labda kujiendeleza zaidi), talk about the new challenge if given the oportunity and how you will overcome (strategies) kwa experience uliyonayo tayari.

    Kwa ambao ndio kwanza fresh from school you have little to say, though jitahidi kuwaconvice kwamba you are the person they are looking (Ur next from none). The fact kwamba huna experience kazini does not mean hujui ni nini unatakiwa kufanya.Umesoma na utafanya kazi kwa makini kutokana na shule uliyopata na ushauri toka kwa watu utakaokuwa ukifanya nao kazi. Onyesha upo kushare knowledge uliyonayo na wenzako kwa manufaa ya Shirika/Kampuni husika na kwamba utajifunza kutoka kwa wenzako for the same reason(Team work).
     
  3. N

    Ngereja JF-Expert Member

    #3
    Feb 25, 2008
    Joined: Feb 27, 2007
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    How do you tackle salary questions? for example, how much should a company pay you for the job on offer?

    What is the trick here, and what interviewers are looking for?
     
  4. zomba

    zomba JF-Expert Member

    #4
    Feb 25, 2008
    Joined: Nov 27, 2007
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    1. Never bring up salary. Let the interviewer do it first. Good salespeople sell their products thoroughly before talking price. So should you. Make the interviewer want you first, and your bargaining position will be much stronger.

    2. If your interviewer raises the salary question too early, before you’ve had a chance to create desire for your qualifications, postpone the question, saying something like, “Money is important to me, but is not my main concern. Opportunity and growth are far more important. What I’d rather do, if you don’t mind, is explore if I’m right for the position, and then talk about money. Would that be okay?”

    3. The #1 rule of any negotiation is: the side with more information wins. After you’ve done a thorough job of selling the interviewer and it’s time to talk salary, the secret is to get the employer talking about what he’s willing to pay before you reveal what you’re willing to accept. So, when asked about salary, respond by asking, “I’m sure the company has already established a salary range for this position. Could you tell me what that is?” Or, “I want an income commensurate with my ability and qualifications. I trust you’ll be fair with me. What does the position pay?” Or, more simply, “What does this position pay?”

    4. Know beforehand what you’d accept. To know what’s reasonable, research the job market and this position for any relevant salary information. Remember that most executives look for a 20-25%$ pay boost when they switch jobs. If you’re grossly underpaid, you may want more.

    5. Never lie about what you currently make, but feel free to include the estimated cost of all your fringes, which could well tack on 25-50% more to your present “cash-only” salary.

    The trick may be to expose unrealistic people. An opportunity to demonstrate you understand the basic principle that everyone needs to justify their cost. Extra pay should be based on extra performance or productivity.
     
  5. Kisura

    Kisura JF-Expert Member

    #5
    Feb 25, 2008
    Joined: Jun 21, 2007
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    Employers watajaribu kukulipa kidogo as they can, especially upande wa private sector. Wako pale kutengeneza profit sio kukutajirisha wewe.

    One, Its' always best to do a research of how much the position pays, pia ukiangalia experience yako, elimu n.k Kwa upande mwingine, angalia size ya kampuni hiyo, location na vitu vya namna hiyo.

    Second; another trick which seems to work very well, wakikuuliza "unataka kulipwa kiasi gani" waulize, how much are they willing to offer, wakikubabaisha,maana kwanza wataanza kuangaliana lakini wanatakiwa wakupe jibu, confidently, waulize wakupe jibu. In most cases watakupa range, make sure unawa geuzia kibao--it works often times. Na hapo ukiwa umeshafanya reserch yako utakuwa na nafasi nzuri ya ku-negociate.
     
  6. P

    PAULM New Member

    #6
    Jul 20, 2009
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    The answer about the negotiation of salary still is problem on my side i need more information concine
     
  7. Askofu

    Askofu JF-Expert Member

    #7
    Jul 30, 2009
    Joined: Feb 14, 2009
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    Some Interviewers do not like to disclose their package, even though they have salary scale in their hands, they only want you to give your market value and then they rate if you are above, within or below their range. This is tricky, when you ask about their range they insist you give them your market value
     
  8. ANDIREE

    ANDIREE Member

    #8
    Jul 30, 2009
    Joined: Jul 24, 2009
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    hi all
     
  9. ANDIREE

    ANDIREE Member

    #9
    Jul 30, 2009
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    mambo yenu wazima wote
     
  10. Njowepo

    Njowepo JF-Expert Member

    #10
    Jul 30, 2009
    Joined: Feb 26, 2008
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    On my side kuhusu mshahara as fresh from school nilibahatika kuwa na mshikaji akifanya apo kabla so nikamuuliza range akanijibu so nikatop up kidogo then ikatick kwenye interview,
    But kwa kazi zingine nilipohama nilikuwa nataja my past salary na kutop up a reasonable amount depending on the company you are going ofcourse bila kusahau viallowance vya apa na pale
     
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