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BP and The US Oil Spill disaster!

Discussion in 'International Forum' started by MziziMkavu, May 3, 2010.

  1. MziziMkavu

    MziziMkavu JF-Expert Member

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    May 3, 2010
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    By ROBERT BURNS and STEVEN R. HURST, Associated Press Writers


    VENICE, La. – No remedy in sight, President Barack Obama on Sunday warned of a "massive and potentially unprecedented environmental disaster" as a badly damaged oil well a mile deep in the Gulf of Mexico spewed a widening and deadly slick toward delicate wetlands and wildlife. He said it could take many days to stop.

    Obama rushed to southern Louisiana to inspect forces arrayed against the oil gusher as Cabinet members described the situation as grave and insisted the administration was doing everything it could. Then he took a helicopter ride over the water to view the 30-mile oil slick caused by as much as 210,000 gallons of crude gushing into the Gulf each day.

    The spill threatens not only the environment but also the region's abundant fishing industry, which Obama called "the heartbeat of the region's economic life." As of now, it appeared little could be done in the short term to stem the oil flow, which was also drifting toward the beaches of neighboring Mississippi and farther east along the Florida Panhandle. Obama said the slick was 9 miles off the coast of southeastern Louisiana.

    BP Chairman Lamar McKay raised faint hope that the spill might be stopped more quickly by lowering a hastily manufactured dome to the ruptured wellhead in the next six to eight days, containing the oil and then pumping it to the surface. Such a procedure has been used in some well blowouts but never at the mile-deep waters of this disaster.

    The leaking well was not only an ecological disaster but a potential political hazard, as well, depending on how the public judges the Obama administration's response. In 2005, President George W. Bush stumbled in dealing with Hurricane Katrina in the Gulf and left the impression of a president distant from immense suffering. His presidency never recovered.

    Obama vowed that his administration, while doing all it could to mitigate the disaster, would require well owner BP America to bear all costs. "Your government will do whatever it takes for as long as it takes to stop this crisis," he said.

    "BP is responsible for this leak. BP will be paying the bill," Obama said after a Coast Guard briefing in Venice, a Gulf Coast community serving as a staging area for the response. He stood before cameras in a heavy rain, water dripping from his face.

    The president also stopped to talk with six local fishermen and said the challenge is "How do we plug this hole?" After that, he said, protecting the estuaries would be the next priority.

    "We're going to do everything in our power to protect our natural resources, compensate those who have been harmed, rebuild what has been damaged and help this region persevere like it has done so many times before," Obama said.

    Arriving in New Orleans, the president shunned helicopter travel because of a threat of tornadoes and drove to Venice to tour a close-to-the-water staging area where the government and BP were trying to keep the slick from causing even more damage.

    Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano said any comparison between the ruptured BP oil well and Katrina was "a total mischaracterization" and that the government had taken an "all hands on deck" approach from the beginning.

    Administration officials have been at pains to explain that Obama's late March decision to expand offshore oil exploration could be altered as a result of the spill and that stricter safety rules would doubtless be written into leases.

    In reality, oil companies and the government lack the technology to prevent the damage from a well gushing masses of oil, killing wildlife and tainting a delicate ecosystem. The oil washing ashore could ruin the coastal fishing industry.

    While the government has mobilized masses of equipment to scoop up, burn and block the oil from moving ashore, the tools to contain the ecological and economic damage washing toward the coast were akin to big-game hunting with a pellet gun.

    Adm. Thad Allen, the Coast Guard commandant, said the volume of spewing oil could climb to 100,000 barrels a day in the event of a total wellhead failure, a much greater breach than is believed to exist now. He spoke to the obvious urgency of stopping the flow of crude.

    "The difference between 1,000 and 5,000 barrels a day (original estimates), when you look at the potential discharge of 100,000, leads me to believe that there are a lot of inaccuracies associated with trying to estimate flow from a broken pipe at 5,000 feet," Allen said. "That's the reason it's so very, very important we focus on stopping this leak right away."

    White House spokesman Robert Gibbs told reporters with the president that Obama was briefed on the spill for 50 minutes during the flight from Washington by homeland security and counterterrorism adviser John Brennan and energy adviser Carol Browner. Chief of staff Rahm Emanuel rounded out the presidential party.

    Gibbs said Brennan and Browner went "through a series of scenarios," while Obama wanted to know "what was the latest on our first, our biggest priority, which is capping the well."

    Interior Secretary Ken Salazar tried to assure Americans that BP, rather than taxpayers, would pay for what will likely become the nation's worst oil disaster.

    The bill is going to be an extraordinary hit on BP's bottom line. The sea shore and the animals and fishermen who depend on them will pay, perhaps, an even heavier cost.
    ___
    Hurst reported from Washington.

    http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/us_gulf_oil_spill_obama
     
  2. Ab-Titchaz

    Ab-Titchaz Content Manager Staff Member

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  3. Ab-Titchaz

    Ab-Titchaz Content Manager Staff Member

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  4. Ab-Titchaz

    Ab-Titchaz Content Manager Staff Member

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  5. Ab-Titchaz

    Ab-Titchaz Content Manager Staff Member

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  6. MziziMkavu

    MziziMkavu JF-Expert Member

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    Interior chief critical but other official says pushing BP aside not an option

    [​IMG]Patrick Semansky / AP
    An oil-covered pelican joins others on an island in Barataria Bay off Louisiana on Sunday. The island is home to hundreds of nesting brown pelican as well as terns, gulls and roseate spoonbills.

    HOUSTON - In its harshest criticism of BP to date, the Obama administration on Sunday said the oil giant had missed "deadline after deadline" in its efforts to seal the blownout oil well in the Gulf of Mexico.At a press conference outside BP America's Houston headquarters, Interior Secretary Ken Salazar said he understood the challenges but was frustrated that BP had set deadlines that "have not been met."
    Asked if he trusted BP, Salazar said that the company "from day one, frankly, has not fulfilled the mission it was supposed to fulfill." "There's no question BP is throwing everything at this problem," he said, but then added: "Do I have confidence that they know exactly what they're doing? No, not completely."
    He said that's why NASA, the Department of Energy and other agencies have stepped in to work with BP engineers on solutions. Salazar and officials from those agencies met with BP staff earlier Sunday.
    By law, BP as the responsible party has to carry out the cleanup, while the government provides oversight.
    After the Exxon Valdez tanker spilled 11 million gallons of oil in Alaska in 1989, Congress dictated that oil companies be responsible for dealing with major accidents — including paying for all cleanup — with oversight by federal agencies.
    "If we find they're not doing what they're supposed to be doing, we'll push them out of the way appropriately," Salazar said.
    Why not push BP aside?
    But the Coast Guard official in charge of the oil spill response operation tempered that view.
    The government is forced to rely on BP and the private sector because only they have the technical know-how to stop the spill at those depths, Coast Guard Commandant Thad Allen said Sunday.
    [​IMG]Video
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    Salazar blasts BP
    May 23: Amid criticism that the White House is ceding too much power to BP, Interior Secretary Ken Salazar strikes back. NBC’s Mike Viqueira reports.
    Nightly News

    Allen was asked on CNN's "State of the Union" show why the federal government did not completely take over the spill containment operation.

    "What makes this an unprecedented anomalous event is access to the discharge site is controlled by the technology that was used for the drilling, which is owned by the private sector," Allen said. "They have the eyes and ears that are down there. They are necessarily the modality by which this is going to get solved."
    Anger with the government and BP, which was having a well drilled when the blowout happened, has boiled over as the spill spreads.
    Environmental Protection Agency chief Lisa Jackson was back in Louisiana, where she planned to visit with frustrated residents.
    Salazar and Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano were to lead a Senate delegation to the region on Monday to fly over affected areas and keep an eye on the response.
    White House Press Secretary Robert Gibbs also told CBS' "Face the Nation" on Sunday that Justice Department officials have been to the region gathering information about the spill. However, he wouldn't say whether the department has opened a criminal investigation.
    President Barack Obama also has named a special independent commission to review what happened.
    The spill began after the Deepwater Horizon oil rig exploded off the coast of Louisiana on April 20, killing 11 workers, and sank two days later. At least 6 million gallons of crude have spewed into the Gulf of Mexico since, though a growing number of scientists have said they believe it's more.

    'Top kill' next attempt
    The visits from top Obama chiefs come as BP said it will be at least Tuesday before engineers can shoot mud into the blownout well at the bottom of the Gulf, yet another delay in the effort to stop the oil.
    [​IMG]Video
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    Red seas in the Gulf
    May 22: May 22: NBC’s Anne Thompson takes a disturbing journey into the heart of the oil spill.
    Nightly News

    A so-called "top kill" has been tried on land but never 5,000 feet underwater, so scientists and engineers have spent the past week preparing and taking measurements to make sure it will stop the oil that has been spewing into the sea for a month. They originally hoped to try it as early as this weekend.
    "It's taking time to get everything set up," BP spokesman Tom Mueller said. "They're taking their time. It's never been done before. We've got to make sure everything is right."
    Crews will shoot heavy mud into a crippled piece of equipment atop the well. Then engineers will direct cement at the well to permanently stop the oil.
    BP has tried and failed several times to halt the gusher, and has had some success with a mile-long tube now siphoning some of the crude and natural gas.
    Engineers are also developing several other plans in case the top kill doesn't work, including an effort to shoot knotted rope, pieces of tire and other material — known as a junk shot — to plug the blowout preventer, which was meant to shut off the oil in case of an accident but did not work.
    In other developments:

    • BP spokesman John Curry said Sunday the mile-long tube inserted into the leaking well siphoned some 57,120 gallons of oil within the past 24 hours, a sharp drop from the 92,400 gallons of oil a day that the device was sucking up on Friday. However, the company has said the amount of oil siphoned will vary widely from day to day.
    • A pelican colony in Barataria Bay off Louisiana was awash in oil. Several of the birds splashed in the water and preened themselves, apparently trying to clean crude from their feet and wings. Pelican eggs were glazed with rust-colored gunk, with thick globs floating on top of the water. Nests sat precariously close the mess in mangrove trees. Workers had surrounded the island with the booms, but puddles of oil had seeped through the barrier.
    • A marine scientist said that to figure out how much oil has spilled, experts should measure the plumes of dissolved methane coming from the blown well. Unlike oil, methane dissolves uniformly in seawater so it could be measured accurately and scientists could use that measurement to calculate the amount of the spill, David Valentine of the University of California-Santa Barbara wrote in an opinion article in the journal Nature.
    Confidence in BP? Not really, says Obama aide - Gulf oil spill- msnbc.com
     
  7. BAK

    BAK JF-Expert Member

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    BP will continue live video feed during 'top kill' attempt

    By the CNN Wire Staff
    May 25, 2010 11:02 a.m. EDT



    • NEW: BP will continue to provide a live video feed Wednesday of ruptured pipe gushing oil
    • BP ready to begin 12-hour diagnostic test of "top kill" maneuver
    • Plan to begin maneuver Wednesday; BP gives it 60 to 70 percent chance of success
    • President on Friday will make his second visit to the area since the oil spill
    The situation in the Gulf keeps getting worse, and so far, there's no end in sight. Anderson Cooper reports live tonight from the region as BP makes another attempt to stop the leak. Watch "AC360°" tonight at 10 ET on CNN for the latest on stopping the leak.
    Venice, Louisiana (CNN) -- BP says it will continue to provide a live video feed of the ruptured pipe gushing oil into the Gulf of Mexico during Wednesday's planned top kill procedure to seal the well.
    Earlier Tuesday, there had been some consternation on Capitol Hill when it wasn't certain BP would maintain the live feed.
    Democratic Rep. Edward J. Markey of Massachusetts expressed concern Tuesday that BP might terminate the images during the top kill attempt.
    "It is outrageous that BP would kill the video feed for the top kill," said Rep. Edward J. Markey, D-Massachusetts before BP's announcement to continue the live video.
    Markey chairs the Select Committee on Energy Independence and Global Warming and the Energy and Environment Subcommittee in the Energy and Commerce Committee.
    With the Gulf of Mexico oil slick growing thick and public patience growing thin, BP put equipment in place Tuesday for the top kill, a procedure that has never been tried under a mile of water.
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    Video: Fishermen take anti-BP messages public
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    Video: BP's online opposition
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    Video: Jindal: Red tape slows oil cleanup


    All of BP's previous attempts to cap the Gulf oil spill have failed.
    There's a 30 or 40 percent chance that the top kill won't work. Nevertheless, it's a pivotal moment for the London-based oil giant.

    After diagnostic testing that could take up to 12 hours, BP plans to pump 50,000 pounds of thick, viscous fluid twice the density of water into the site of the leak to stop the oil flow. The well can then be sealed for good with cement.

    Day 36: What's happening with the Gulf oil spill
    Depending on the pressure readings, the top kill could start as early as Wednesday, said BP Senior Vice President Kent Wells.
    "Normally you'd spend months to do what we've done in days and weeks," Wells said Tuesday in a conference call with reporters.
    It's a method that has succeeded on above-ground oil wells in the Middle East but has never been done on the ocean floor.

    Wells said a team of experts will examine conditions inside the five-story blowout preventer to ascertain how much pressure the injected mud will have to overcome. A blowout preventer is a device that is supposed to stop oil from gushing into the sea in the event of a problem like the one triggered when the oil rig Deepwater Horizon sank a month ago, triggering the leak.

    BP's latest effort comes 36 days into the oil spill, amid a memorial service and new controversy surrounding federal inspectors overseeing oil drilling in the Gulf of Mexico.
    A report from the Interior Department's inspector general found that inspectors in the Minerals Management Service accepted meals and tickets to sporting events, such as the 2005 Chick-fil-A Peach Bowl game, from companies they monitored.

    Interior Secretary Ken Salazar, who has ordered a widespread shake-up of the agency since the massive oil spill now fouling the Gulf of Mexico, called the report "yet another reason to clean house."
    In Jackson, Mississippi, the 11 men who died in the oil rig explosion were remembered Tuesday in a poignant memorial service. Some of them have sued BP and Transocean, owner of the Deepwater Horizon oil drilling rig.

    Meanwhile, Carol Browner, the assistant to the president on energy and climate change, told CNN Tuesday that she is optimistic about BP's attempt at a top kill.
    "We want this to work and will do everything in our power to make sure it works," the former Environmental Protection Agency administrator said. "We need the BP technology -- they know how to operate the little robots, how to operate the vessels. But we're not relying on them."

    Gulf oil spill demystified: A glossary
    Browner said the federal government will have its own experts analyze and evaluate the top-kill procedure.
    "We want this thing shut down," she said.
    But there was a "remote possibility" that BP would have to call off the top kill, Wells said. Or that it will not work at 5,000 feet under the surface.

    If the top-kill procedure fails, BP will try to fit a second, smaller containment dome over a ruptured pipe. A first containment dome did not succeed in stopping the leak.
    The company said it has other options, too: One of those options would be to install a second blowout preventer at the leak site.

    The blowout preventer did not function properly after the rig sank about 40 miles off Louisiana, and oil has been gushing into the Gulf ever since at an estimated rate of about 5,000 barrels a day (210,000 gallons).
    Some estimates have put the amount of oil spewing from the well far higher.

    U.S. Commerce Secretary Gary Locke has declared a fishery disaster in the Gulf.
    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has closed nearly 22 percent of the federal waters in the Gulf for commercial and recreational fishing. Locke's declaration will allow the federal government to give Gulf states additional resources to soften the blow.
    WINK: BP gas station owners say boycotting them doesn't hurt BP
    With the Obama administration under increasing criticism for its handling of the spill, Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano said the government considers BP the responsible party. President Obama will be visiting the Louisiana coast on Friday, according to White House spokesman Robert Gibbs. It will be Obama's second visit to the area since the oil spill.

    This week, the anger and frustration in oil spill-affected coastal communities came through loud and clear.
    "BP We Want Our Beach Back" read one of many signs posted in Grand Isle, Louisiana, where fishing is a $2.4 billion industry.
     
  8. MwanaFalsafa1

    MwanaFalsafa1 JF-Expert Member

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    I don't know how BP is going to do damage control and sadly oil companies are a big lobby group so I don't think Congress or the administration can do anything significant that will please the public.
     
  9. MziziMkavu

    MziziMkavu JF-Expert Member

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    CEO also says 'we have let people down in our defense of the shore'


    [​IMG]


    COVINGTON, La. - BP said Wednesday it had begun injecting mud into the blown-out well in the hopes of stopping the Gulf oil disaster, shortly after the Coast Guard gave it a green light and its chief executive issued an apology of sorts.The oil giant said the operation started at 2 p.m. ET.

    Earlier, CEO Tony Hayward said it would take a day or two to see if the risky procedure worked. Speaking on NBC's "TODAY" show, Hayward also said he "felt devastated and gutted" after viewing damage to a coastal beach on Tuesday.

    "We have let people down in our defense of the shore and we are going to redouble our efforts," Hayward said when asked why last week he said the environmental impacts seemed "very, very modest."

    The top kill involves pumping enough mud into the gusher to overcome the flow of the well, which has leaked millions of gallons of oil into the water since an April 20 rig explosion. Engineers then plan to follow it up with cement that the company hopes will permanently seal the well.

    The top kill has been successful in above ground wells but has never been tried a mile beneath the sea. Hayward earlier pegged its chances of success in this case at 60 to 70 percent.

    It is the company's latest effort to stem the spill and comes as politicians and Gulf residents are losing patience with the company over several failed attempts to stop the leak.

    'Taking shortcuts'

    The attempt comes as more hearings this week focused on what led to the explosion aboard the Deepwater Horizon that killed 11 workers and triggered the catastrophe.

    [​IMG]


    Senior managers from Transocean Ltd., which owned the rig, were complaining that day that BP was "taking shortcuts" by replacing heavy drilling fluid with seawater in the well, according to sworn testimony by Truitt Crawford, a rig worker. BP was leasing the rig and is responsible for stopping the leak and the cleanup.

    The seawater was being used in preparation for dropping a final blob of cement into the well as a temporary plug for the pipe. Workers had finished pumping the cement into the exploratory well to bolster and seal it against leaks until a later production phase.

    Crawford said seawater would provide less weight to contain surging pressure from the ocean depths. His testimony was expected to be part of a hearing in New Orleans. A BP spokesman declined to comment on what he said.

    Dozens of worker statements obtained by The Associated Press describe the hours and minutes before the sudden, violent blowout and many said they were concerned about the pressure coming from below.
    And tests within an hour of the blast indicted the pressure was building, according to a congressional memo about new warning signs that a BP investigation indicated. The buildup was an "indicator of a very large abnormality," in the well, BP's investigator indicated.

    Still, the rig team was "satisfied" that another test was successful and resumed adding the seawater, said the memo by U.S. Reps. Henry Waxman and Bart Stupak to members of the Committee on Energy and Commerce, which is investigating what went wrong.

    Other warning signs of problems included an unexpected loss of fluid from a pipe known as a riser five hours before the explosion, which could have indicated a leak in the blowout preventer, the memo said. The blowout preventer is designed to shut down the well in case of an emergency. BP has cited its failure as a contributor to the blast.

    Top kill details

    Plugging the leak, however, was expected to be the focus Wednesday 50 miles off the Louisiana coast.
    If all goes as planned, engineers will pump fluid twice as dense as water from two barges into two 3-inch-wide lines that will feed it into the blowout preventer. Crews plan to pump it in at a rate of 1,680 to 2,100 gallons per minute in hopes of counteracting the upward pressure of the oil gushing to the surface. They stockpiled some 50,000 barrels of the heavy mud, a manufactured substance that resembles clay.

    Bob Bea, an engineering professor at the University of California at Berkeley, said the procedure carries a high risk of failure because of the velocity at which the oil may be spewing.

    "I certainly pray that it works, because if it doesn't there's this long waiting time" before BP can dig a relief well that would cut off the flow, Bea told the AP.

    Obama heads to the Gulf

    President Barack Obama could get the results in person. He prepared to head to the Gulf on Friday to review efforts to halt the contaminating crude that scientists said seems to be growing significantly darker, from what they can see in the underwater video. It suggests that heavier, more-polluting oil is spewing out.

    [​IMG]

    Ahead of his trip, Obama planned to address an Interior Department review of offshore drilling that's expected to recommend tougher safety protocols and inspections for the industry, according to an administration official. The official spoke on condition of anonymity ahead of the public release Thursday of the findings of the 30-day review Obama ordered after the spill.

    A new report from the Interior Department's acting inspector general alleged that drilling regulators have been so close to oil and gas companies they've been accepting gifts including hunting and fishing trips and even negotiating to go work for them.

    The Interior Department's acting inspector general, Mary Kendall, said her report began as a routine investigation.

    "Unfortunately, given the events of April 20 of this year, this report had become anything but routine, and I feel compelled to release it now," she said.
    Her biggest concern is the ease with which Minerals Management Service employees move between industry and government, Kendall said. While no specifics were included in the report, "we discovered that the individuals involved in the fraternizing and gift exchange — both government and industry — have often known one another since childhood," Kendall said.

    BP starts 'top kill' by injecting mud into well - Gulf oil spill- msnbc.com
     
  10. MziziMkavu

    MziziMkavu JF-Expert Member

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    President extends moratorium on offshore drilling permits

    [​IMG]Members of the Louisiana National Guard install floating dams designed to protect the beach from incoming oil at the Grand Isle East State Park on Wednesday.

    WASHINGTON - President Barack Obama defensively and sometimes testily insisted on Thursday that his administration, not oil giant BP, was calling the shots in responding to the worst oil spill in the nation's history. "I take responsibility. It is my job to make sure that everything is done to shut this down," Obama declared at a news conference in the East Room of the White House. The Gulf of Mexico oil spill dominated the hour-long session.
    He called the spill, now in its sixth week, an "unprecedented disaster" and blasted a "scandalously close relationship" he said has persisted between Big Oil and government regulators. Obama announced new steps to deal with the aftermath of the spill, including continuing a moratorium on drilling permits for six months. He also said he was suspending planned exploration drilling off the coasts of Alaska and Virginia and on 33 wells under way in the Gulf of Mexico.
    The president's direct language on being in charge of the spill response, which he repeated several times, marked a change in emphasis from earlier administration assertions that, while the government was overseeing the operation, BP had the expertise and equipment to make the decisions on how to stop the flow.
    As recently as Monday, the top federal official in charge of dealing with the oil catastrophe, Coast Guard Adm. Thad Allen, declined to broadly say the federal government was "in charge." Instead, when asked about that, Allen told reporters that BP was responsible for the cleanup and the government was accountable to make sure the company did it. "I would say it's less a case of 'in charge,'" Allen said when asked about that phrase.
    [​IMG]Live video
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    Watch as BP tries to stop the oil spill
    LIVE VIDEO: Underwater video from a sub working at the spill site. This video stream is provided by BP and could go down at any time.
    NBC News

    Yet with each passing day, public frustration with Obama's administration has grown, and his poll numbers on the matter are dropping.
    Claiming control carries its own political risks for Obama, because any failure to stop the gusher will then belong to the president. But he could suffer politically if his administration is seen as falling short of staying on top of the problem or not working hard to find a solution.
    "The American people should know that from the moment this disaster began, the federal government has been in charge of the response effort," Obama said. He was reacting to criticism that his administration has been slow to act and has left BP in charge of plugging the leak.
    Obama said many critics failed to realize "this has been our highest priority."
    "My job right now is just to make sure everybody in the Gulf understands: This is what I wake up to in the morning, and this is what I go to bed at night thinking about. The spill."
    "There shouldn't be any confusion here. The federal government is fully engaged," he said, underscoring his central point.
    As he spoke, BP worked furiously to pump mud-like drilling fluid into the blown-out well.
    It was an untested procedure but seemed to be working, officials said Thursday, even as new estimates showed the spill has surpassed the Exxon Valdez in Alaska as the worst in U.S. history.
    'Any reasonable strategy'
    Obama said while the "top kill" procedure being used by BP demonstrated his administration's willingness to try "any reasonable strategy" to stop the gusher, the process "offers no guarantee of success."
    Asked about inevitable comparisons between his handling of the disaster with his predecessor's handling of Hurricane Katrina in 2005, Obama said: "I'll leave it to you guys to make those comparisons and make — and make — and make judgments on it, because — because what I'm spending my time thinking about is how do we solve the problem?
    "And I'm confident that people are going to look back and say that this administration was on top of what was an unprecedented crisis," he added.
    "This has been our highest priority," he said. He conceded that "people are going to be frustrated until it stops."
    CONTINUED : 'We've got to get it right'1 | 2 | Next >

    Obama defends feds' response to oil spill - Gulf oil spill- msnbc.com
     
  11. kui

    kui JF-Expert Member

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    I don't like the way they critisize Prez, Obama in this thing, wanataka afanye nini!, most knowledge ya hii kitu wanayo BP wenyewe but they keep critisizing him that he's not doing enough, sasa wanataka akazibe na mikono?
     
  12. Yegomasika

    Yegomasika JF-Expert Member

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    Eti hata wenye slogan ya "Drill baby drill" wanamshambulia Obama. Hizi siasa hazina maana kabisa~nadhani wana siasa walio wengi akili yao haina akili!.
     
  13. MziziMkavu

    MziziMkavu JF-Expert Member

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    Bonyeza hapa uone Oil inavyotoka Baharini Kasheshe huko Amerika jamani mwisho wa Amerika huo msnbc.com Video Player
     
  14. ngoshwe

    ngoshwe JF-Expert Member

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    Oil spill: BP admits its latest attempt to stem the leak has failed

    BP has admitted that its latest effort to stem the 40-day flow of oil into the Gulf has failed.



    By Philip Sherwell in New Orleans and Kamal Ahmed
    Published: 10:16PM BST 29 May 2010


    [​IMG] A protestor at a BP gas station in the Soho neighborhood of Manhattan Photo: AP


    Speaking at a news conference at Fourchon Beach in Louisiana, Doug Suttles, BP's chief operating officer, said that attempts to plug the oil leak with a mixture of mud and debris had done nothing to stem the flow. The attempt was later abandoned.

    "I don't think the amount of oil coming out has changed," said Mr Suttles. "Just by watching it, we don't believe it's changed."



    He added: "After three full days, we have not been able to stop the flow. We don't believe we'll achieve success so we're moving on. We have the decision to move to the next option."
    Meanwhile, a bad storm hit the area, raising fears that more oil could be blown ashore.
    A company source told The Sunday Telegraph that the "top kill" tactic – the best prospect for ending the devastating leak - has been unsuccessful and that BP would now need to look at other strategies. "It seems at this stage that the 'top kill' has not worked," the source said. That means the crisis is now entering a new stage as BP exhausts its preferred solutions to plug the leak.
    The company last night deployed an underwater robot with a saw in an attempt to slice off the leaking pipe and place a cap and seal over the opening – an extremely complicated manoeuvre.
    In practice, it now seems almost certain that the oil from the worst spill in American history is likely to continue to flow until a relief well is drilled - an operation expected to take several more weeks.
    News of the latest setback came as it emerged that BP executives could face a criminal investigation into their actions.
    Senior federal prosecutors and agents are taking the first steps toward a formal criminal probe. A high-level justice department team is assessing whether the company may have broken safety regulations before the disaster.
    BP already faces a welter of civil damages lawsuits as a result of the April 20 explosion that killed 11 workers on the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig.
    The investigators have been conducting interviews in Louisiana and warned attorneys for BP and Transocean, the rig's owner, that they should retain all documents and other internal records relevant to the spill.
    The company has been informed of the inquiry, which is a standard preliminary step before prosecutors decide whether to launch a criminal investigation.
    For BP, the moment of make or break is fast approaching as public anger rises rapidly. If oil continues to pour into the ocean at the current rate for several weeks it will be devastating to the company.
    But anger with the US government is also high – forcing President Barack Obama to visit the coast on Friday. In the beleaguered resort of Grand Isle, he stood on a beach closed to the public and pledged his solidarity with residents, saying he was ordering a tripling of manpower in areas hit by the spill.
    BP has been fighting a slick of 130 miles by 70 miles with burn-offs and chemical dispersants, but the first oil has started washing ashore in the fragile ecosystem of the bayou (coastal marshes).
    And what Mr Obama's choreographed four-hour visit did not show him was the most damaging impact on the waters of the Gulf of Mexico and those crucial wetlands.
    A couple of miles away, where Frank Lensmyer's small fishing boat bobbed amid patches of ugly fudge-coloured oil in Barataria Bay, it was the silence and stillness that was the most disturbing.
    At this time of year, the waters here should be churning with trout and redfish chasing shrimp; large pods of porpoises elegantly rising from the waves, and terns and pelicans swooping on prey.
    Home to dozens of offshore oil rigs, the bay would also normally be dotted with large shrimping trawlers and dozens of craft carrying sports fishermen preparing to celebrate Memorial Day weekend, the traditional start of the summer season.
    But the waters are closed to fishing. And as Mr Lensmyer, a cigar-chomping tugboat owner, gave The Sunday Telegraph a tour of this unnaturally empty expanse, the only other vessels were those deployed by the British oil giant BP in the battle to contain the spill.
    From his boat, 60 miles south of New Orleans, the only signs of life were a few seabirds and the occasional porpoise skirting oil. A chemical-like odour stung the throat.
    "These waters should be jumping with fish and shrimp, and there's just nothing there," said Mr Lensmyer, 55, as he surveyed the desolate scene. "I've been fishing here for 25 years and I've never seen anything like this. It's very, very sad. You would normally look out here and see dozens of fishing and shrimping boats fishing. Now it's just us."
    Our journey out to the bay had brought home the spill's impact on the bayou marshes as we passed large clumps of reeds clogged with oil.
    "This is a disaster on many levels," said Larry Schweiger, president of the National Wildlife Federation (NWF). "About 90 per cent of gulf fishing is dependent on these wetlands. Fish spawn here, blue crabs and other sea life which are a key part of the food chain rely on the marshes, the oyster and shrimp populations rely on healthy wetlands."
    The disappearing bayou is also a crucial protective barrier from storms for communities such as New Orleans. For a population still recovering from Hurricane Katrina, the implications are understood.
    The damage here is insidious – and devastating to the livelihoods and lifestyles of the gulf's residents. The chilling lack of life that is so evident to the human eye is explained by the fact that larger fish, the porpoises and the birds have headed away from the stink and pollution of the spill.
    Deep-water cameras sent out on an NWF boat last week showed reefs that should be teeming with fish were near devoid of life but thick with oil globules. Scientists believe much of the plume has never even reached the surface. "When things are this bad, the larger fish get out of town," said Dr Martin O'Connell, director of fish research at the University of New Orleans. But the oysters and shrimp in polluted areas will not have escaped, nor will smaller fish and other organisms that rely on the wetlands for survival. "The impact on the food chain will be felt for many years."
    BP has laid thousands of miles of absorbent booms in an operation commanded by the US Coast Guard. But in many cases, the barriers are already soaked with oil and were apparently put down too late to protect the marshes.
    The US Geological Survey on Thursday estimated that between 12,000 and 19,000 barrels has spilled into the gulf each day after the rig explosion on April 20. The figure is significantly higher than the previous 5,000 barrels per day estimate reached by government oceanic scientists and used by BP. It translated to between 18 and 28 million barrels – exceeding the 11 million gallons that gushed out of the Exxon Valdez tanker off Alaska in 1989.
    BP's chief executive, Tony Hayward, was forced to admit on Friday that the leak was an "environmental catastrophe". He had previously been excoriated by the US media for referring to the spill as "tiny" relative to the size of the gulf.
    For the residents of the gulf, that debate is about much more than numbers. Mr Lensmyer knows there will be no chance for the foreseeable future to fish for the speckled trout he should be landing. As a sign held up by a woman in Grand Isle during Mr Obama's visit declared: "I'd rather be fishing".

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/newsbysector/energy/oilandgas/7783998/Oil-spill-BP-admits-its-latest-attempt-to-stem-the-leak-has-failed.html
     
  15. ngoshwe

    ngoshwe JF-Expert Member

    #15
    May 30, 2010
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    Release date: 29 May 2010

    BP started the "top kill" operations to stop the flow of oil from the MC252 well in the Gulf of Mexico at 1300 CDT on May 26, 2010.

    The procedure was intended to stem the flow of oil and gas and ultimately kill the well by injecting heavy drilling fluids through the blow-out preventer on the seabed, down into the well.

    Despite successfully pumping a total of over 30,000 barrels of heavy mud, in three attempts at rates of up to 80 barrels a minute, and deploying a wide range of different bridging materials, the operation did not overcome the flow from the well.

    The Government, together with BP, have therefore decided to move to the next step in the subsea operations, the deployment of the Lower Marine Riser Package (LMRP) Cap Containment System.
    The operational plan first involves cutting and then removing the damaged riser from the top of the failed Blow-Out Preventer (BOP) to leave a cleanly-cut pipe at the top of the BOP's LMRP. The cap is designed to be connected to a riser from the Discoverer Enterprise drillship and placed over the LMRP with the intention of capturing most of the oil and gas flowing from the well. The LMRP cap is already on site and it is currently anticipated that it will be connected in about four days.

    This operation has not been previously carried out in 5,000 feet of water and the successful deployment of the containment system cannot be assured.

    Drilling of the first relief well continues and is currently at 12,090 feet. Drilling of the second relief well is temporarily suspended and is expected to recommence shortly from 8,576 feet.



    BP Press Office London: +44 20 7496 4076
    BP Press office, US: +1 281 366 0265
    Unified Command Joint Information Center:+1 985-902-5231
    www.deepwaterhorizonresponse.com
    www.bp.com/gulfofmexicoresponse
    Update on Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill | Press release | BP
     
  16. MziziMkavu

    MziziMkavu JF-Expert Member

    #16
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    Hali hii inatisha na Huenda ikaenea hiyo Oil sehemu nyingi ya Bahari katika hii Dunia ni Hatari sana viumbe wa Baharini wengi wao watakufa oo jamani inaleta Woga sana.
     
  17. MziziMkavu

    MziziMkavu JF-Expert Member

    #17
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    In Photos: Haunting images of the gulf oil disaster


    It’s been more than a month since an explosion on the Deepwater Horizon oil rig killed 11 people and blew out an undersea well that continues to gush oil into the Gulf of Mexico. In the following weeks, there have been attempts to contain and control the scope of the environmental damage.
    But so far none have been successful. Over the weekend, Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal announced he intended to proceed with plans to construct sand booms to protect his [COLOR=#366388 ! important][COLOR=#366388 ! important]state's [COLOR=#366388 ! important]shoreline[/COLOR][/COLOR][/COLOR] — without waiting for federal approval. Meanwhile, engineers for BP are working feverishly to prepare for their "top kill" maneuver, hoping an injection of heavy mud will stop the leak.

    Dead sharks and dolphins are washing ashore. Crabs, turtles and birds are being found soaked in oil as the slick sloshes into Louisiana’s wetlands. South of New Orleans, chocolate-like globs of oil have shut down the public beach.

    Coast Guard officials say the spill’s impact now stretches 150 miles. Some scientists fear the spreading plumes will catch the ocean current to the Florida Keys and up to the eastern seaboard.
    Photographers' images, some of them chillingly beautiful, can only begin to hint at the enormity of the disaster.

    [​IMG]
    Shrimp boats equipped with booms collect oil in Chandeleur Sound, La., on May 5. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

    [​IMG]
    [COLOR=#366388 ! important][COLOR=#366388 ! important]Oil [COLOR=#366388 ! important]moves[/COLOR][/COLOR][/COLOR] past an oil rig, top right, in Chandeleur Sound on May 5. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

    [​IMG]
    An oil-soaked bird struggles against the side of an Iron Horse supply vessel at the site of the oil spill off Louisiana on May 9. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

    [​IMG]
    A Portuguese man-of-war is seen from under the [COLOR=#366388 ! important][COLOR=#366388 ! important]oily [COLOR=#366388 ! important]water[/COLOR][/COLOR][/COLOR] in Chandeleur Sound on May 6. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

    [​IMG]
    A dead jellyfish floats amid oil May 6 in the Gulf of Mexico, southwest of the Southwest Pass of the Mississippi River on the [COLOR=#366388 ! important][COLOR=#366388 ! important]coast [COLOR=#366388 ! important]of [/COLOR][COLOR=#366388 ! important]Louisiana[/COLOR][/COLOR][/COLOR]. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

    [​IMG]
    A Coast Guard plane flies over the Development Driller III oil drilling platform, which was drilling a relief well May 12 at the site of the [COLOR=#366388 ! important][COLOR=#366388 ! important]Deepwater [COLOR=#366388 ! important]Horizon [/COLOR][COLOR=#366388 ! important]oil [/COLOR][COLOR=#366388 ! important]spill[/COLOR][/COLOR][/COLOR]. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)

    [​IMG]
    Risers, the outer casings of oil drill pipes, are seen on the deck of the service vessel Joe Griffin as it prepares to head to Port Fourchon, La., on May 11. (Pool Photo/Gerald Herbert)

    [​IMG]
    An aerial view of the northern Chandeleur barrier islands, 20 miles from the main Louisiana coastline, shows sheens of oil [COLOR=#366388 ! important][COLOR=#366388 ! important]reaching [COLOR=#366388 ! important]land[/COLOR][/COLOR][/COLOR] May 6. (AP Photo/David Quinn)

    [​IMG]
    A pod of bottlenose dolphins swims in the oily water of Chandeleur Sound on May 6. Five days later, six dead dolphins were found along the Gulf Coast. Officials were investigating oil's role in the deaths. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

    [​IMG]
    An oil-stained cattle egret is seen on the deck of the Joe Griffin supply vessel May 9. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

    [​IMG]
    Oil swirls in the Gulf of Mexico currents May 6. (AP Photo/Dave Martin)

    [​IMG]
    Contractors unload oil booms to protect marshlands May 13 in Hopedale, La. (John Moore/Getty Images)

    [​IMG]
    Pelicans fly past a nest of eggs apparently stained with oil on a Louisiana island May 22. The island is home to hundreds of brown pelican nests as well as terns, gulls and roseated spoonbills. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

    [​IMG]
    A glob of oil thought to be from the massive oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico sits on a reed on a beach in Southwest Pass, La., on May 15. (Reuters/Lee Celano)

    [​IMG]
    A Greenpeace worker collects samples of oil May 19 that washed up along the mouth of the Mississippi River near Venice, La. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)

    [​IMG]
    An oil-covered dragonfly, stuck to [COLOR=#366388 ! important][COLOR=#366388 ! important]marsh [COLOR=#366388 ! important]grass[/COLOR][/COLOR][/COLOR], tries to clean itself May 18 in Garden Island Bay near Venice. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

    [​IMG]
    Birds fly over oil on the water April 29 near Breton Sound Island, on the southernmost tip of the [COLOR=#366388 ! important][COLOR=#366388 ! important]Chandeleur [COLOR=#366388 ! important]Islands[/COLOR][/COLOR][/COLOR]. (Reuters/Sean Gardner/Greenpeace/Handout)
     
  18. Oxlade-Chamberlain

    Oxlade-Chamberlain JF-Expert Member

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    walipotezamda mwingi sana kwenye kutupiana lawama badala ya kushirikiana kutataua tatizo kwanza ,sasa hali imekuwa mbaya mno na sijui itakuwaje.
     
  19. MziziMkavu

    MziziMkavu JF-Expert Member

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    AP ENTERPRISE: Spill grew, BP's credibility faded

    [​IMG] AP – FILE - BP PLC CEO Tony Hayward asks members of the media to step back as he walks along Fourchon Beach …

    Related Quotes Symbol Price Change BP 42.95 -2.43 XOM 60.46 -1.00 ^GSPC 1,089.41 -13.65 [​IMG] [​IMG]



    By TAMARA LUSH, HOLBROOK MOHR and JUSTIN PRITCHARD, Associated Press Writers Tamara Lush, Holbrook Mohr And Justin Pritchard, Associated Press Writers – 2 hrs 36 mins ago
    At nearly every step since the Deepwater Horizon exploded more than a month ago, causing the worst oil spill in U.S. history, rig operator BP PLC has downplayed the severity of the of Mexico.
    On almost every issue — the amount of gushing oil, the environmental impact, even how to stop the leak — BP's statements have proven wrong. The erosion of the company's credibility may prove as difficult to stop as the from the sea floor.
    "They keep making one mistake after another. That gives the impression that they're hiding things," said U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson, a Florida Democrat who has been critical of BP's reluctance to publicly release videos of the underwater gusher. "These guys either do not have any sense of or they are Neanderthals when it comes to public relations."
    Take one of the most obvious questions since the April 20 explosion: How much oil is leaking? Official estimates have grown steadily — first the word was none, then it was 42,000 gallons, then 210,000 gallons. And now a team of scientists say the leak may well be five times that, making the spill worse than the Exxon Valdez.
    All the while, BP has been slow to acknowledge the leak was likely much worse than the public had been told.

    The oil giant's behavior has led to accusations that it has been motivated to keep the leak estimate low because under federal law the size of eventual fines is tied to the
    Nelson said that he believes BP has delayed release of everything from the actual flow rate to the videos because of a federal law that allows the government to seek penalties of $1,000 to $4,300 per barrel — 42 gallons — of oil spilled in U.S. waters. "And so naturally they want to minimize what people were thinking they were going to spill."
    High-end estimates by BP, the Coast Guard and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration reached 588,000 gallons per day in late April, BP spokesman David Nicholas acknowledged Friday to The Associated Press after weeks of the company sticking with the lower estimate. But it wasn't until Thursday that officials had conceded that the leak was considerably larger than the 210,000-gallon-a-day figure that had been floated as the best estimate for the prior four weeks.

    Even before the accident, there were indications that BP could vastly underestimate an oil spill's likely size. In its regional spill response plan for the Gulf, the formula BP proposed to use to estimate the volume of oil in a surface sheen was smaller by a factor of 100 from the accepted international standard, which is also the basis for estimates by NOAA, the federal agency tasked with such calculations.
    Nicholas said he doesn't know where the numbers in BP's plan "were derived, but they were not used" in calculating the amount of oil that had reached the Gulf's surface since the accident. He also emphasized that the official estimates were not BP's alone, but rather a collaboration with government agencies.

    With criticism continuing to mount, when he was pressed Friday about BP's perceived lack of transparency,
    said: "We're trying to provide as much data as we can. We're in the middle of this operation. ... There's a tremendous amount of transparency here."
    Asked late Friday why BP had downplayed so many issues related to the spill and why BP had been wrong on so many issues, Nicholas did not answer directly, saying, "This event is unprecedented; no company, no one, has ever had to attempt to deal with a situation such as this at depths such as this before. BP, the Unified Command, the federal authorities and the hundreds of companies and thousands of individuals engaged on this effort, are doing everything we can to bring it under control and make it good."
    Nicholas said only Friday that daily estimates from April 27 through April 30 were based on two scientific standards. The "low end" was always around 42,000 gallons per day, the "best guess" was between 210,000-252,000 gallons per day, and the "high end" varied from 504,000-to-588,000 gallons per day, he said.
    The 210,000-gallon estimate that became the official talking point for weeks turned out to be wrong, too. A team of scientists from the government and academia said Thursday that the leak is really spewing somewhere between 500,000 and a million gallons a day.
    The new estimates were between 12 and 24 times greater than what was first offered, and instantly made the the worst in U.S. history. Even using the low end of the estimates, nearly 18 million gallons have spilled so far. At the high end, the well could have gushed as many as 39 million gallons.
    Even President Barack Obama has voiced his frustration, laying the blame squarely on BP for the often incorrect assessment of the spill's size.
    "Their interest may be to minimize the damage and, to the extent that they have better information than anybody else, to not be fully forthcoming," Obama told reporters Thursday. "So my attitude is, we have to verify whatever it is they say about the damage."
    To be sure, experts say there's no easy way to measure a leak 5,000 feet deep. Some estimates were based on satellite images or flyovers. The federal government has worked closely with BP, and Obama has acknowledged shortcomings, but it's BP that controls much of the technology, like underwater robots that capture

    Obama noted that BP kept video of the leak and didn't make it public.
    "At that point, BP already had a camera down there, but wasn't fully forthcoming in terms of what did those pictures look like? And when you set it up in time-lapse photography, experts could then make a more accurate determination. The administration pushed them to release it," Obama said. "But they should have pushed them sooner. But there was a lag of several weeks that I think, that I think shouldn't have happened."
    BP's Nicholas said the government "has had access to the video since the incident started."
    Perhaps if BP, one of the wealthiest companies in the world, had released the video to the public and independent experts, it would have led to more accurate assessments of the spill's size early on.
    "I'm disappointed in BP," said Plaquemines, La., "BP can't see the forest through the trees."
    Nungesser said Friday that he hoped a meeting with Obama would result in the federal government giving BP more direction on how to save the state's wetlands.
    Then there are the attempts, unsuccessful so far, to stop the oil. On Thursday morning, BP and federal officials said on morning TV talk shows that the so-called "top kill," a procedure to pumpinto its blown-out well in hopes of stopping the leak, was going well. Yet hours later, BP said the company had actually paused the procedure the night before. A spokesman told AP on Friday that stops and starts are normal, in part to analyze progress.
    Ultimately, the "top kill" effort was deemed a failure and BP pulled the plug on it on Saturday.
    BP's downplaying of the situation may have began with a phone call, some 16 hours after the rig exploded and killed 11 workers, leaving behind an inferno that burned for two days and has been leaking at least ever since the rig sank.
    In a low-key tone, a man who identifies himself as Carlos Moreno notified Louisiana authorities that oil was unlikely to reach their shores. He emphasized that BP wanted to give a "heads up" about the sheen spotted floating near the crippled rig 50 miles off the Louisiana coast.
    At first, the Coast Guard said there was no leak from the vast reservoir of oil more than a mile below the Gulf's surface. Then, after analyzing images taken underwater by remote-controlled cameras, the Coast Guard estimated 42,000 gallons a day were leaking. A week after the explosion, that rose to 210,000 gallons.
    "You're never comfortable with estimating at the beginning of the oil spill," Coast Guard Rear Admiral Mary Landry told AP.

    The shift in spill estimates — and the other downplayed details from BP — have caused environmental activists like Lorraine Margeson of St. Petersburg, Fla., to question whether other details are lowballed, as well. Margeson wonders if the numbers of dead animals and birds are being accurately reported by BP and other officials.
    "From the get go, every aspect of the situation has been downplayed," she said. "This thing has been out of control in terms of informing the public and transparency from day one."
    ___

    AP ENTERPRISE: Spill grew, BP's credibility faded - Yahoo! News
     
  20. Ami

    Ami JF-Expert Member

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    Jun 1, 2010
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    Uroho wa mafuta umeitumbukia nyongo Amerika.Imekuwa ikichonganisha watu wa kila eneo wapigane ili ipate urahisi wa kupora rasilimali hii muhimu kwa uchumi wake na wa dunia.
    Mbaya zaidi katika miaka ya karibuni imekuwa ikishiriki yenyewe kuuwa kufikia lengo hilo.Lakini sasa Allah(s.w) amewatolea mafuta kwenye bahari yao na hawayataki tena.BP mpaka sasa inasema TOP KILL imeshindwa kuzuia kisima walichokitumbua zaidi ya meli moja chini ya bahari.Sasa wanajaribu kukata bomba hilo kwa msumeno ili walivishe kofia ya kuziba.Hatimaye wanaweza kufanikiwa. Lakini jee wataacha?.
     
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