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Africa Energy Forum 2010

Discussion in 'International Forum' started by Genda, Jun 15, 2010.

  1. G

    Genda Member

    Jun 15, 2010
    Joined: Mar 23, 2009
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    Africa Energy Forum 2010
    's largest power & gas conference
    The 12th AEF will be in Basel, 29 June to 1 July

    The Africa Energy Forum and its executive dialogues examine the African power, gas and renewable energy sectors and offer 3 days of analysis, debate and meetings.

    The twelfth Africa Energy Forum will be held in Basel, Switzerland, from 29th June to 1st July 2010. The impressive line up of African ministers (seven to date) reflects the poignancy of the event and is indicative of the importance that African governments are attaching to the development of the power sector.

    AEF is the world's largest meeting on African power, renewable energy, biofuels and gas, and provides an annual marketplace for those active in the various sectors. Over 410 delegates attended AEF 2009 from 40 countries. Africa
    was well represented, accounting for 35% of the total. What was evident was that countries with promising IPP programmes sent the largest delegations from Africa. Their proactive stance in engaging with international investors and financiers is clearly reflected by increased domestic business.

    The unique advantage of holding AEF in Europe is that it provides access to a large international audience. Basel was chosen as a destination because the conference facilities are excellent, the city is conveniently located where Switzerland, Germany and France meet, and, contrary to perception, costs are competitive for delegates.

    The AEF programme will look at how environmental concerns, development goals, and power supply interlink, and how to achieve a positive outcome from this interdependence. A number of factors point to hydropower's growing importance. The increasing pressure of consumers' demand for clean and affordable power is another feature that will be discussed. African consumers increasingly require power and will find solutions if the state fails to provide it.

    A number of African countries have achieved impressive growth rates over recent years despite stagnation in the output of power utilities. Individual, temporary and captive power have filled the gap at a cost above the utility tariffs but which is still worth paying. Reliability is a valuable and, in some cases, essential attribute.

    Confirmed Ministers addressing AEF 2010:
    - Barbara Hogan, Minister of Public Enterprises, South Africa
    - Elias Mudzuri
    , Minister of Energy & Power Development Zimbabwe
    - Salvador Namburete
    , Minister of Energy, Mozambique
    - William Ngeleja, Minister of Energy & Minerals, Tanzania
    - Dipuo Peters, Minister of Energy, South Africa
    - Coletha Ruhamya, Minister of State in charge of Energy & Water, Rwanda