Tanzania among top 10 Places to Invest in Africa 2018

lutemi

JF-Expert Member
Dec 24, 2013
1,711
2,000
is this what chadema team working on in nairobi?
it is anrticle seems to be writen by one of the chadema nairobian team
so we common tanzanians still supports our hero JPM on what he fights against those thugs and traitors.
we urge him to keep up he will never walk alone.
finally and just a matter of time we will get to know what is behind the chadema plans and scenarior
Sometimes before you comment things try to rethink twice, the way you argue it seems you don't know what is going on here in our country. When you read careful the reporter he/her has point on it. It's better the government to use the think tanker who can take some points and try to work on it. Otherwise we are going to loose economic growth here
 

Imvubhu

Senior Member
Aug 27, 2017
181
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Hoja kwa hoja. kila sentensi hapo juu ina sekta zake hivyo iwe na taarifa ya hesabu wapi tumepanda na wapi tunashuka kuliko kuonyesha taarifa za jumla na kutoa majibu ya jumla jumla. waliotoa hoja waonyeshe hesabu na wainga hoja waonyeshe hesabu zao hapo tutafanya ulinganifu sawia.
 

vutakamba

JF-Expert Member
Apr 2, 2012
201
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Ngoja waje wajuzi wa uchumi wanaotuaminisha uchumi unakua kwa kasi. Lkn hatumo ktk top 10
 

Mwana

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Aug 6, 2010
5,399
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Tanzania: Not a place to invest in Africa

By Juergen T Steinmetz - September 18, 2017



eTN earlier published an article on investing in Africa was based on a report by Rand Merchant Bank’s seventh edition of Where to Invest in Africa.

One of our readers in Tanzania strongly objected to the ranking of Tanzania and responded. eTN guaranteed for the writer to remain anonymous. The response reads:

Did the writer actually contact anyone running a business in Tanzania?? The writer of the report it is based on likely never did and wrote something from half a continent away with no idea what is actually happening to the business community.

Such articles and reports only serve to embolden current policies and will be used as encouragement that the path the current president is on is the correct one when it is in fact in a phase of rapid self-destruction.

A) investors are leaving in droves. Contact companies like Worldwide Movers to back this up.

B) many of the banks are on the verge of collapse due to a high level of nonperforming loans – the economy has tanked and people can’t pay the loans back. Several have already collapsed. Annual accounts/statements showing this have been pulled from websites.

C) most, if not all, sectors are reporting a massive reduction in turnover and profits. Dealers in building supplies (a good indicator of growth) are reporting business as halved!

D) mining companies are being targeted with extremely questionable commodity value assessments and subsequent extortionate bills for tax (search Acacia).. They are closing and retrenching workers.

E) The tea industry (Unilever, Mufindi Tea Company etc) hasn’t made a profit in several years, resulting in large-scale retrenchments (thousands of workers over the last two years), company sale and bank repossession.

F) The tourism industry is experiencing similar difficulties in being levied an unsustainable level of regulatory compliance and tax burden. Many, especially in southern Tanzania, are being sold.

G) the value of construction timber/forestry has also collapsed because people aren’t building, and would be even worse had it not been for a questionable decision to move thousands of government workers to Dodoma. Pine tree blocks that would sell for Tsh13m-16m were subsequently being traded at Tsh2-3m! Private forestry operators such as Green Resources are in trouble and retrenching.

H) industrial exports have declined these last months/year.

I) investors are being harassed and extorted left right and center. The Tourism sector is paying 56 or so DIFFERENT TYPES of taxes and fees. The revenue authority district and regional managers are being told to raise revenue on a shrinking economy whatever the cost – driving more to close businesses in record numbers.

J) work permits are being rejected or delayed for months in an anti-foreigner angle, so management of investments/projects is getting impossible

K) political opposition leaders are being shot in the streets (search Tindu Lissu), being arrested on trumped-up charges and passing through police stations like a merry go round. Any public of social media statements are deemed illegal and there are allegedly dozens in jail and court for Facebook posts etc. Their houses and offices are being bombed or set alight. Political parties are not being permitted to organize meetings/rallies. Parliament has been muzzled – their live TV broadcast cut off and MPs are being arrested regularly for charges of sedition etc.

L) The government isn’t listening to the pleas of the private sector – just bulldozing back to the socialist policies that Nyerere collapsed the economy with last time.

And against this backdrop, the article states that Tanzania went up two places?? What planet are they from?!

What other indicators would the writers look at?!!
propaganda zenu haziitishi Tanzania! Politcians are being shot seriously! Wewe uliyeleta hapa ni mtanzania na ninaamini unasihi Tanzania kati ya Politicians 1000, wangapi waliopigwa risasi. Yaani propaganda za mabepari weupewakoloni wachache wanaandika kwa manufaa yao na wewe unabeba jinsi lilivyo. Haya nikuulize je unayaamini? Hebu tumia akili kidogo tu uliyonayo kuanalise kabla hijabeba habari nzimanzima huku ukijua ukweli ni upi. Otherwise wewe ni mkoloni mwenyewe, kibaraka wao au unafaidika na vibaraka!
 

Kinyungu

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Apr 6, 2008
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By Juergen T Steinmetz September 18, 2017

One of the most important findings of Rand Merchant Bank’s (RMB) seventh edition of Where to Invest in Africa is that the African continent could find itself hovering on the brink of disaster if it continues to depend on its current economic fundamentals and does not usher in economic diversification. Where to Invest in Africa 2018 highlights those countries which have understood the need to adapt to the prolonged slowdown in commodity prices and sluggish levels of production growth – and those which haven’t.

The theme for Where to Invest in Africa 2018 is “Money Talks” and this edition “follows the money” on the African continent to evaluate aspects crucial to each country’s economic performance. The report focuses on the main sources of dollar revenues in Africa which allows it to measure the most important income generators and identify investment opportunities.

“Over the past three years, some African governments have had to implement deep and painful budget cuts, announce multiple currency devaluations and adopt hawkish monetary policy stances – all as a result of a significant drop in traditional revenues,” says RMB Africa analyst and co-author of Where to Invest in Africa 2018 Celeste Fauconnier.

“Some countries have been more nimble and effective than others in managing shortfalls,” says Nema Ramkhelawan-Bhana, also RMB Africa analyst and an author of the report. “But major policy dilemmas have ensued, forcing governments to balance economically prudent solutions with what is politically palatable.”

“The last three years have sounded an alarm, amplifying what is now a dire need for the economies of Africa to shift their focus from traditional sources of income to other viable alternatives,” says Neville Mandimika, RMB Africa analyst and contributor to Where to Invest in Africa 2018

“These years have exposed a number of African nations to severe economic stress – especially that of liquidity shortages. Unfortunately, there is no quick fix to infuse into a context as complex as this, and traditional forms of revenue will remain a reality for many years to come,” says Ronak Gopaldas, RMB Africa analyst and co-author.

In this edition of Where to Invest in Africa 2018, RMB’s Investment Attractiveness Index, which balances economic activity against the relative ease of doing business, illustrates how subdued levels of economic activity have diluted several scores on the index when compared to last year, resulting in some interesting movements within the Top 10.

Notable omissions from the Top 10 this year are Nigeria and Algeria, which have fallen from numbers six and 10 to numbers 13 and 15 respectively. Ethiopia and Rwanda, on the other hand, have climbed three and four places respectively.

But probably the most notable change is that South Africa has fallen from first place for the first time since the inception of the report, ceding its place to Egypt which is now Africa’s most attractive investment destination.

Egypt displaced South Africa largely because of its superior economic activity score and sluggish growth rates in South Africa, which have deteriorated markedly over the past seven years. South Africaalso faces mounting concerns over issues of institutional strength and governance though in South Africa’s favour are its currency, equity and capital markets which are still a cut above the rest, with many other African nations facing liquidity constraints.

Morocco retained its third position for a third consecutive year having benefitted from a greatly enhanced operating environment since the “Arab Spring” which began in 2010. Surprisingly, Ethiopia, a country dogged by socio-political instability, displaced Ghana to take fourth spot mostly because of its rapid economic growth, having brushed past Kenya as the largest economy in East Africa. Ghana’s slide to fifth position was mostly due to perceptions of worsening corruption and weaker economic freedom.

Kenya holds firm in the Top 10 at number six. Despite being surpassed by Ethiopia, investors are still attracted by Kenya’s diverse economic structure, pro-market policies and brisk consumer spending growth. A host of business-friendly reforms aimed at rooting out corruption and steady economic growth helped Tanzania climb by two places to number seven. Rwanda re-entered the Top 10 having spent two years on the periphery, helped by being one of the fastest reforming economies in the world, high real growth rates and its continuing attempt to diversify its economy.

At number nine, Tunisia has made great strides in advancing political transition while an improved business climate has been achieved by structural reforms, greater security and social stability. Cote d’Ivoire slipped two places to take up the tenth position. Although its business environment scoring is still relatively low, its government has made significant strides in inviting investment into the country leading to a strong increase in foreign direct investment over the years resulting in one of the fastest growing economies in Africa.

For the first time, Nigeria does not feature in the Top 10, with its short-term investment appeal having been eroded by recessionary conditions. Uganda is steadily closing in on the Top 10 though market activity is likely to remain subdued after a tumultuous 2016 marred by election-related uncertainty, a debilitating drought and high commercial lending rates. Though Botswana, Mauritius and Namibiaare widely rated as investment grade economies, they do not feature in the Top 10 mostly because of the relatively small sizes of their markets – market size has been a key consideration in the report’s methodology.

Where to Invest in Africa 2018 also includes 191 jurisdictions around the world, and measures Africa’s performance relative to other country groupings. The unfortunate reality is that African countries are still at the lower end of the global-performance spectrum, which continues to be dominated by the US, UK, Australia and Germany.

The index measures how attractive countries are to investors.

Top 10:
1. Egypt
2. South Africa
3. Morocco
4. Ethiopia
5. Ghana
6. Kenya
7. Tanzania
8. Rwanda
9. Tunisia
10. Ivory Coast

eNCA


Top 10 countries to invest in Africa: Egypt number one - eTurboNews (eTN)
Fake news
 

commonmwananchi

JF-Expert Member
Mar 12, 2011
3,105
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Sometimes before you comment things try to rethink twice, the way you argue it seems you don't know what is going on here in our country. When you read careful the reporter he/her has point on it. It's better the government to use the think tanker who can take some points and try to work on it. Otherwise we are going to loose economic growth here
which economic growth are you talking about on the list below;
ACACIA mining company?

PETRA mining company?

TICS clearing&forwading company?

IPTL with Seth&Rugemalira?

SYMBION power supliers?

and so of the same kind whose JPM is fighting against huge corruption scandals.

my take:
if JPM was wrong about the cost findings of makinikia and even brought out some if the opposition public leaders disagreeng with the cost mentioned by the Prof Mruma comitee.
why ACACIA announcing the closure of its projects in the country?
 

shige2

JF-Expert Member
Oct 11, 2016
7,897
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By Juergen T Steinmetz September 18, 2017

One of the most important findings of Rand Merchant Bank’s (RMB) seventh edition of Where to Invest in Africa is that the African continent could find itself hovering on the brink of disaster if it continues to depend on its current economic fundamentals and does not usher in economic diversification. Where to Invest in Africa 2018 highlights those countries which have understood the need to adapt to the prolonged slowdown in commodity prices and sluggish levels of production growth – and those which haven’t.

The theme for Where to Invest in Africa 2018 is “Money Talks” and this edition “follows the money” on the African continent to evaluate aspects crucial to each country’s economic performance. The report focuses on the main sources of dollar revenues in Africa which allows it to measure the most important income generators and identify investment opportunities.

“Over the past three years, some African governments have had to implement deep and painful budget cuts, announce multiple currency devaluations and adopt hawkish monetary policy stances – all as a result of a significant drop in traditional revenues,” says RMB Africa analyst and co-author of Where to Invest in Africa 2018 Celeste Fauconnier.

“Some countries have been more nimble and effective than others in managing shortfalls,” says Nema Ramkhelawan-Bhana, also RMB Africa analyst and an author of the report. “But major policy dilemmas have ensued, forcing governments to balance economically prudent solutions with what is politically palatable.”

“The last three years have sounded an alarm, amplifying what is now a dire need for the economies of Africa to shift their focus from traditional sources of income to other viable alternatives,” says Neville Mandimika, RMB Africa analyst and contributor to Where to Invest in Africa 2018

“These years have exposed a number of African nations to severe economic stress – especially that of liquidity shortages. Unfortunately, there is no quick fix to infuse into a context as complex as this, and traditional forms of revenue will remain a reality for many years to come,” says Ronak Gopaldas, RMB Africa analyst and co-author.

In this edition of Where to Invest in Africa 2018, RMB’s Investment Attractiveness Index, which balances economic activity against the relative ease of doing business, illustrates how subdued levels of economic activity have diluted several scores on the index when compared to last year, resulting in some interesting movements within the Top 10.

Notable omissions from the Top 10 this year are Nigeria and Algeria, which have fallen from numbers six and 10 to numbers 13 and 15 respectively. Ethiopia and Rwanda, on the other hand, have climbed three and four places respectively.

But probably the most notable change is that South Africa has fallen from first place for the first time since the inception of the report, ceding its place to Egypt which is now Africa’s most attractive investment destination.

Egypt displaced South Africa largely because of its superior economic activity score and sluggish growth rates in South Africa, which have deteriorated markedly over the past seven years. South Africaalso faces mounting concerns over issues of institutional strength and governance though in South Africa’s favour are its currency, equity and capital markets which are still a cut above the rest, with many other African nations facing liquidity constraints.

Morocco retained its third position for a third consecutive year having benefitted from a greatly enhanced operating environment since the “Arab Spring” which began in 2010. Surprisingly, Ethiopia, a country dogged by socio-political instability, displaced Ghana to take fourth spot mostly because of its rapid economic growth, having brushed past Kenya as the largest economy in East Africa. Ghana’s slide to fifth position was mostly due to perceptions of worsening corruption and weaker economic freedom.

Kenya holds firm in the Top 10 at number six. Despite being surpassed by Ethiopia, investors are still attracted by Kenya’s diverse economic structure, pro-market policies and brisk consumer spending growth. A host of business-friendly reforms aimed at rooting out corruption and steady economic growth helped Tanzania climb by two places to number seven. Rwanda re-entered the Top 10 having spent two years on the periphery, helped by being one of the fastest reforming economies in the world, high real growth rates and its continuing attempt to diversify its economy.

At number nine, Tunisia has made great strides in advancing political transition while an improved business climate has been achieved by structural reforms, greater security and social stability. Cote d’Ivoire slipped two places to take up the tenth position. Although its business environment scoring is still relatively low, its government has made significant strides in inviting investment into the country leading to a strong increase in foreign direct investment over the years resulting in one of the fastest growing economies in Africa.

For the first time, Nigeria does not feature in the Top 10, with its short-term investment appeal having been eroded by recessionary conditions. Uganda is steadily closing in on the Top 10 though market activity is likely to remain subdued after a tumultuous 2016 marred by election-related uncertainty, a debilitating drought and high commercial lending rates. Though Botswana, Mauritius and Namibiaare widely rated as investment grade economies, they do not feature in the Top 10 mostly because of the relatively small sizes of their markets – market size has been a key consideration in the report’s methodology.

Where to Invest in Africa 2018 also includes 191 jurisdictions around the world, and measures Africa’s performance relative to other country groupings. The unfortunate reality is that African countries are still at the lower end of the global-performance spectrum, which continues to be dominated by the US, UK, Australia and Germany.

The index measures how attractive countries are to investors.

Top 10:
1. Egypt
2. South Africa
3. Morocco
4. Ethiopia
5. Ghana
6. Kenya
7. Tanzania
8. Rwanda
9. Tunisia
10. Ivory Coast

eNCA


Top 10 countries to invest in Africa: Egypt number one - eTurboNews (eTN)
Despite the numerous challenges the country is going through,
I do believe we are on the right track.
Unfortunately OTHERS ( sic ) aren't seeing this!/

Pamoja na changamoto nyingi nchi inazozipitia,
Naami kuwa tuko katika mwelekeo mzuri. Kwa bahati mbaya WENGINE wetu hatuoni hayo!
 

Bams

JF-Expert Member
Oct 19, 2010
9,952
2,000
Watu

Watu kama nyinyi mlikuwepo hata kipindi cha kugombania Uhuru. .
Ukweli ni kwamba hata uwe na mapenzi makubwa kiasi gani kwa Rais Magufuli, katika uchumi, sera zake na mbinu anazozitumia, zimedidimiza uchumi, na akiendelea hivyo hivyo ni lqzima ataua kabisa ukuaji wa uchumi wa nchi hii. Mpaka sasa investmate growth imeshuka toka 26.8% mpaka 3.4%. Unemployment, japo sina data ni dhahiri inakuwa kwa kasi. Biashara zilizokuwepo, nyingi zimekufa (kwa takwimu za serikali yenyewe), lakini watanzania wala hawahitaji kutegemea yaliyoandikwa, kwa sababu wapo Tanzania, wanajua hali ilivyo huko mitaani.

Nadhani Rais hajajua uchumi unajengwa kwa namna gani. Uchumi ni akili na siyo nguvu, ni werevu na siyo amri. Na wala hajui kuwa kwa tajiri, hana shida ya kupata mahali pa kuwekeza, shida ni kupata wawekezaji katika nchi. Wawekezaji wakubwa siyo desperate people, siyo watu unaoweza kuwazungusha kama pia. Wanatafutwa Duniani nzima.
 

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