Human Rights Watch: Kubana uhuru na sheria kandamizi vyatawala TZ, elimu bure yaendelea kuwa fanikio kuu kwa serikali


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Wakati anapokea ofisi Oktoba 2015, Rais John Magufuli aliweka dhamira ya kuondoa rushwa kwenye serikali na uwajibikaji kwa wananchi wa kawaida lakini badala amezuia uhuru wa msingi kupitia sheria kandamizi. Waandishi, wanasiasa, watetezi wa haki za binadamu, wanaharakati na maafisa wa juu wa umoja wa mataifa wamepata vitisho na kuwekwa vizuizini kiholela na maafisa wa serikali.

Wakati serikali imepiga hatua kwenye upatikanaji wa elimu kupitia elimu bure ya sekondari, imehuisha zuio la kinidhamu kwa wanafunzi wajawazito. Imechelewesha mchakato wa mabadiliko ya sheria kwa umri wa kuingia kwenye ndoa kwa wavulana na wasichana kufika miaka 18.

Uhuru wa kutoa maoni
Mamlaka kiholela wamekata au kutishia wanaharakati na wanachama mashuhuri wa vyama vya upinzani ambao walikosoa utawala au Rais.

Disemba 13, 2016 polisi walimkata Maxence Melo, mtetezi wa haki za binadamu na mmiliki wa JamiiForums, tovuti ya unyetishaji wa taarifa muhimu na ripoti na Mike Mushi, mwanahisa wa Jamii Media ambayo ndio inamiliki mtandao huo. Mtandao una makala na mijadala inayoweka wazi rushwa kwenye sekta ya umma na kukosoa maamuzi ya serikali.

Polisi walipekua ofisi za JamiiForums na nyumba ya Melo bila hati. Inaripotiwa walitoa nakala ya nyaraka kadhaa.

Taarifa nzima ipo hapa chini..


========
Upon taking office in October 2015, President John Pombe Magufuli committed to stamp out corruption in government and to be accountable to ordinary citizens, but instead has restricted basic freedoms through repressive laws and decrees. Critical journalists, politicians, human rights defenders, civil society activists and senior United Nations officials have faced various threats, intimidation and arbitrary detention by government authorities.

While the government made some progress in expanding access to free secondary education, it reinforced a discriminatory ban against pregnant students. It further stalled on a legal reform process to increase the age of marriage to 18 for boys and girls.

Freedom of Expression
Authorities arbitrarily arrested or otherwise threatened and harassed rights activists and numerous prominent members of opposition parties who were critical of the government or the president.

On December 13, 2016, police arrested Maxence Melo, a prominent human rights defender and the owner of Jamii Forums, an independent whistleblower and reporting website, and Mike William, a shareholder of Jamii media, which hosts the site. The site hosted articles and debates exposing public sector corruption and criticizing government actions.

Police searched the offices of Jamii Forums and Melo’s home without warrants. They reportedly made copies of several documents. On December 16, 2016, the Resident Magistrate Court of Dar es Salaam brought charges against Melo, under Tanzania’s controversial Cyber Crimes Law, including obstruction of investigations for refusing to reveal the names of anonymous contributors to Jamii Forums, and “managing a domain not registered in Tanzania.” Their trial began in August 2017 and continued at time of writing.



201801wr_tanzania_human_rights_graphic.jpg?itok=EQAeMgfL

In March, police in Morogoro, about 200 kilometers west of Dar es Salaam, arrested Emmanuel Elibariki, a popular Tanzanian rapper known as Ney wa Mitego, following the release of his song that allegedly insulted the president. He was released without charges.

In July, Dar es Salaam’s district commissioner ordered the arrest of Halima Mdee, a member of parliament and head of Bawacha, the women’s wing of the opposition political party Chadema. Mdee had been critical of the president’s decision to ban pregnant girls from public schools. Police charged her with insulting the president.

In August, police arrested Ester Bulaya, a Chadema member of parliament for Bunda, for conducting political activities outside her constituency. In separate events, police also arrested Godbless Lema, a Chadema member of parliament for Arusha Urban, and Salum Mwalimu, the party’s deputy secretary general in Zanzibar, accusing both politicians of sedition.

In September, unidentified attackers shot and wounded Tundu Lissu, an outspoken member of parliament critical of the president, in Dodoma. Lissu, Chadema’s chief whip, and president of the Tanganyika Law Society, was arrested multiple times in 2017, including for “hate speech” and for “insulting words that are likely to incite ethnic hatred.”

In October, police arrested Zitto Kabwe, leader of ACT Wazalendo, an opposition party, and charged him with sedition, on grounds of breaching the Cyber Crime Act and the Statistics Act of 2015, which criminalizes the publication of statistics that are not endorsed by the National Bureau of Statistics.

On October 17, police raided a workshop organized by the Initiative for Strategic Litigation in Africa (ISLA), a Pan African organization advancing women’s and sexual rights. Dar es Salaam’s head of police ordered arbitrary arrests of 12 lawyers and activists, including two South Africans, one Ugandan and nine Tanzanian nationals, on spurious charges of “promoting homosexuality.” Police released them on October 26, and deported all foreign lawyers a day later. The case against nine nationals remained open at time of writing.

On November 14, Tanzanian government officials in Dar es Salaam prevented Human Rights Watch from holding a news conference to launch a report on the abuse of Tanzanian migrant domestic workers in Oman and the United Arab Emirates.

On June 25, Home Affairs Minister Mwigulu Nchemba threatened to deregister organizations that challenged the president’s controversial June 22 statement banning pregnant girls and teen mothers from attending school, and threats to prosecute or deport anyone working to protect rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people.

In September, Tanzania’s National Assembly passed the Electronic and Postal Communications (Online Content) Regulations, which aim to control content used on social media, and impose onerous fines on individual users and online providers.

Freedom of Media
The government shut down or threatened privately owned radio stations and newspapers, ended live transmissions of parliamentary debates, and ordered the prosecution of at least 10 individuals over posts on social media. In March, President Magufuli publicly warned media outlets to “be careful, watch it.”

In March, Dar es Salaam’s regional commissioner, Paul Makonda, who leads all executive functions in the region, raided, with armed security, the offices of Clouds FM Media Group, an independent broadcaster, and demanded the airing of a defamatory video implicating a local pastor. The station refused to broadcast the video.

In June, authorities banned the independent newspaper Mawio for two years over articles linking former presidents to alleged mismanagement of mining deals. In September, the government banned Mwanahalisi, a weekly newspaper, for two years, on claims of “unethical reporting” and “endangering national security” for an article calling for prayers for Tundu Lissu, an opposition party member. In October, authorities banned Raia Mwema, a weekly newspaper, for 90 days for publishing an article deemed critical of Magufuli’s presidency.

Women’s and Girls’ Rights
In July 2016, Tanzania’s Constitutional Court declared child marriage unconstitutional and ordered the government to set 18 as the minimum age of marriage within one year of its ruling. The ruling settled a January 2016 case filed by the Msichana Initiative, a girls’ rights organization, challenging Tanzania’s discriminatory marriage law. In September, Tanzania’s attorney general, George Masaju, appealed the ruling.

In December 2016, the government abolished tuition fees and indirect costs for primary and lower secondary schools. The measure boosted secondary school enrollment, but the poorest students still face obstacles, including long distances to school and costs.

ROSE’S STORY
“I went to Standard 7 [the final year of primary school], but didn’t [take] the final exam...
Many girls regularly experience sexual harassment and exploitation by teachers in schools. Schools lack adequate protection and confidential reporting mechanisms.

Corporal punishment of students is a widespread, lawful practice in Tanzania’s secondary schools, which violates international standards.

Tanzanian domestic workers in Oman and the United Arab Emirates (UAE) face excessive working hours, unpaid salaries, and physical and sexual abuse.

Girls also face discrimination in schooling. School officials can automatically expel pregnant girls and married girls from school. In May, the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology presented re-entry guidelines to amend the regulations and ensure that girls can return to school after pregnancy. Tanzania’s National Assembly did not endorse the guidelines.

Thousands of Tanzanian women working as domestic workers in the Middle East face labor rights violations and other abuses. Tanzania has no law to protect migrant workers overseas, and weak safeguards facilitate abuse of workers.

Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity
In mid-2016, the government initiated an unprecedented crackdown on the rights of LGBT people and their advocates. Senior government officials threatened to arrest gays and their social media followers and to deregister organizations “promoting” homosexuality. They banned the distribution of water-based lubricant, raiding and closing drop-in centers and private clinics that provide services targeting key populations, including men who have sex with men (MSM), sex workers, and people who use drugs.

In December 2016, Dar es Salaam police raided a workshop on HIV prevention among key populations, and briefly detained eight participants. In Zanzibar, police detained nine men for several days on suspicion of homosexual conduct, and subjected them to forced anal examinations, a form of torture.

In March, police arrested a man, 19, suspected of homosexuality based on his Instagram posts and subjected him to an anal exam. Several activists were arrested for holding meetings. In July, President Magufuli stated that “even cows disapprove of” homosexuality. In September, Zanzibar police arrested 20 people at a workshop for parents of key populations and accused them of homosexuality.

Several organizations reported that the crackdown has resulted in HIV-positive men failing to access their anti-retroviral treatment, while other MSM have stopped accessing testing and preventive services.

Asylum Seekers and Refugees
In 2017, Tanzania hosted over 240,000 refugees who entered the country from Burundi since April 2015, following the political unrest in Burundi. In July, President Magufuli ordered the suspension of registration and naturalization of thousands of Burundian refugees, and publicly urged them to voluntarily return to Burundi.

Key International Actors
Tanzania summarily expelled three heads of UN agencies, including Awa Dabo, the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) country director. UNDP was reportedly critical of the conduct of elections in Zanzibar.

In June, Tanzania withdrew from the Open Government Partnership Initiative, a multilateral initiative aimed at promoting government openness, and improving service delivery, government responsiveness, combatting corruption and building greater trust.

In August, three African regional rights experts issued a joint letter of appeal to Tanzania’s president regarding his June 22 statement on pregnant girls.

In July, the UN independent expert on the enjoyment of human rights by persons with albinism, Ikponwosa Ero, visited Tanzania, welcoming government measures to decrease attacks against persons with albinism, but finding that people with albinism live in a “very fragile situation.” She further expressed concern on the use of schools as protection centers for children with albinism.

In September, the UN Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities heard the case of a man with albinism who was attacked by two men, and had not received government compensation for the abuses suffered. The committee concluded that the government had failed to take all necessary measures to prevent acts of violence and to efficiently investigate and punish those acts. The committee further urged the government to promptly prosecute attacks against persons with albinism and to criminalize using body parts for witchcraft.

SOURCE: Human Rights Watch
 
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Hakuna uhuru wa kutoa maoni kabisa...si kwa wanahabari wala wanasiasa...yani hii nchi sijui inakwenda wapi...ukitoa taarifa unaitwa mchochezi...
 
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Ila kwa swala la ushoga acha tuu like banned. Ni aibu sana kwa taifa changa kama hili kuanza kukopy mabinti yasiyo na maana na yenye kuleta athari nyingi zaidi kwenye jamii kama haya
 
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Mpaka aibu kusoma haya matendo!!
 
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Wamesahau fine za mamilioni zilizotozwa kwa vyombo vya habari kwa kuripoti habari iliyotolewa na kituo cha sheria na haki za binadamu hapa nchini.
 
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Kuna kitu sio bure!
 
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Mpaka aibu kusoma haya matendo!!
In December 2016, Dar es Salaam police raided a workshop on HIV prevention among key populations, and briefly detained eight participants. In Zanzibar, police detained nine men for several days on suspicion of homosexual conduct, and subjected them to forced anal examinations, a form of torture.

Hapo kwenye blue ndio pamekluuma sana kamanda
 
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Tulishaambiwa mpango na mkakati wa mabepari kutumia taasisi fulani fulani kuichafua Tanzania..tumeshayaona sana na huu ni muendelezo tu..mwisho wa siku wajinga ndiyo waliwao.
 
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In December 2016, Dar es Salaam police raided a workshop on HIV prevention among key populations, and briefly detained eight participants. In Zanzibar, police detained nine men for several days on suspicion of homosexual conduct, and subjected them to forced anal examinations, a form of torture.

Hapo kwenye blue ndio pamekluuma sana kamanda
All in all magufuli songa mbele kwa mbele.
Mbona hawatukumbushi mauaji ya Ghadaffi, Sadam na uvamizi wa nchi za kiafrika zilizokuwa na tawala zisizo kubali kuwa puppets wa magharibi?
 
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Tulishaambiwa mpango na mkakati wa mabepari kutumia taasisi fulani fulani kuichafua Tanzania..tumeshayaona sana na huu ni muendelezo tu..mwisho wa siku wajinga ndiyo waliwao.
Peleka upuuzi mbali, unadhani hatuoni kwa macho yetu mpaka hizo taasisi ziseme? Hizo taasisi zinachofanya ni kupigia jibu mstari basi, tena mengine wameyaacha.
 
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How Tanzanian domestic workers are 'enslaved' in Oman

“Atiya Z.” (not her real name) and I were sitting under a veranda, shaded from the hot sun in Dar es Salaam, the commercial capital of Tanzania, when she recounted the words that sealed her fate. Atiya told me that in June 2015 she had travelled from her village in Kondowa to Oman for a job as a domestic worker to earn enough money to start a new line of business “for a better life” for her and her six-year-old daughter.
But when she arrived, her employer confiscated her passport and phone, forced her to work 21 hours a day with no rest and no day off; did not allow her to eat food without permission; and beat her every day. After three weeks of enduring this nightmare she tried to flee only for her employer to catch her and bring her back, telling her that the only way she could leave is if she paid them 2 million shillings.
How Tanzanian domestic workers are 'enslaved' in Oman NEWS » | IPPMEDIA...
Atiya said her employer confined her to the house after that. In April 2016, Atiya fell ill and said her employers stripped her naked and beat her with plastic hangers, and her male employer then raped her anally, to punish her. They then took all the money she earned and put her on a flight back to Tanzania the next day: “I was scared, traumatized, and didn’t know who to speak to.”
I spoke to 50 Tanzanian women who worked as domestic workers in Oman or the United Arab Emirates for a Human Rights Watch report issued in November 2017. The majority had migrated to Oman. Many domestic workers find families that treat them well and pay them in full and on time. But I spoke to women who described a far bleaker reality.
Almost all said their employers and agents confiscated their passports. Most worked 15 to 21 hours a day without rest or a day off. More than half said they were paid less than promised or not at all. Many said their employers gave little food, scraps left over from family meals, or starved them as punishment. Most described their employers humiliating them, shouting at them daily and making racial insults. Almost half also said their employers physically assaulted them: pulling their ears, and beating them with sticks and mops.
Nineteen women also described sexual abuse by male family members who groped them, exposed themselves, and chased them around the house. Several described attempted rapes. Some of these cases, like Atiya’s, amounted to forced labour or trafficking into forced labour, which is prohibited in Oman. We documented similar abuses of migrant domestic workers from different nationalities in a previous report on Oman from 2016.
There are more than 154,000 female migrant domestic workers in Oman, according to official Omani statistics from November 2017. They cook, clean, and care for families while in turn hoping to school their children, build homes, or start businesses.
While most domestic workers in Oman come from countries like the Philippines, Indonesia, and India, there are thousands of Tanzanian domestic workers too. Oman has a special relationship with Tanzania, particularly Zanzibar which it once ruled, and the two countries are tied together following centuries of intermarriage, familial and social relationships. Yet, the special relationship has done little to warrant better treatment for Tanzanian domestic workers, and their plight has largely evaded scrutiny.
We found that Tanzanians were left more vulnerable from the start because of the Tanzanian government’s failure to provide effective oversight of recruitment agents that charged domestic workers fees or deceived them about their working conditions. After migrating, it is Oman’s laws and systems that essentially allows employers to overwork, underpay, and abuse domestic workers.
Oman’s abusive kafala (sponsorship) system, in force in many Gulf states, ties migrant domestic workers’ visas to their employers and prohibits workers from changing jobs without their current employer’s permission. Workers risk imprisonment and deportation for “absconding” if they leave, even if they are fleeing abuse.
Some workers said their employers or agents forced them to forego their salaries as a condition for their “release,” work for a new employer who repaid recruitment costs to the initial employer, or work unpaid for months in return for flight tickets home or to recoup recruitment fees. Police and Manpower Ministry officials sometimes abet efforts by employers to recover their costs from their workers who fled abuse.
Other Gulf states have begun to tinker with the kafala system. The UAE for instance allows domestic
workers to change employers without permission after they complete their contract, Saudi Arabia allows workers to change employers without permission in certain abusive conditions, and Qatar allows workers to change or leave employers who have breached their contracts. But Oman has yet to make real reforms. The Oman Manpower Ministry in a response to Human Rights Watch in November 2017, said that it was studying alternatives to the system.
Oman is also now the last Gulf state yet to provide legal protection for domestic workers’ rights. Bahrain included domestic workers into its labor law in 2012, albeit excluded them from its main protections. Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, and more recently in 2017, Qatar and the United Arab Emirates have issued specific legislation for domestic workers. Oman however not only excludes domestic workers from its labor law, but its 2004 domestic worker regulations do not provide effective rights protections, penalties for their breach, or adequate complaints mechanisms.
Furthermore, some Tanzanian domestic workers, like other domestic workers, described how when they fled abuse, the police in Oman not only failed to help them, but charged them with “absconding” for violating the kafala system, or returned them to their employers. At best, they allowed them to leave the country but did not offer them the opportunity to file a criminal complaint. “Hidaya Z.,” for instance, said she went to the police for help in 2016 after a male family member sexually assaulted her but, she said the police told her to pay 200 OMR ($520) or spend three months in jail because her employer reported her for “absconding.”
Of the three Tanzanian workers interviewed by Human Rights Watch who went to the Omani Ministry of Manpower, one said the agent did not turn up to dispute resolution sessions, and the other two said that officials did not believe their stories of abuse and sided with employers. “Basma” for instance, said despite describing her abusive conditions, which amounted to forced labor, to a Manpower Ministry official mediating, he told her that they could not believe her account as they were not there, and instead recommended to Basma’s employer to report her to the police if she refused to pay back the recruitment costs, or work for a new employer who could pay for it.
These accounts also tally with reports by embassy officials in Oman who told Human Rights Watch in 2015 that they did not advise domestic workers to complain to the Manpower Ministry because the ministry officials did not believe them, and because the dispute-settlement department had no power to force employers or agents to attend the sessions or comply with their resolutions.
Having abusive systems and laws is bad for employers too, not just domestic workers. As experienced and skilled domestic workers find themselves trapped to abusive employers, they cannot leave them for better employers in Oman. Instead, some employers are forced into bartering with original employers on the price to “release” them.
The system also enables some good employers to begin to adopt abusive practices. They may come to believe that they should prevent workers from running away by adopting certain practices such as confiscating passports—a common practice—restricting phone calls, confining them to the house, denying them a rest day, or even withholding their pay. Unrealistic expectations that domestic workers can service large extended families, clean multiple houses, or remain at the beck and call for the most minute of tasks--“they drop a spoon on the floor and they call you to pick it up wherever you are in the house”—leave domestic workers overworked and employers disgruntled. Employers may even believe that domestic workers must be bullied into working harder or faster through shouting, insulting and even beatings.
Not only is this abusive, such conditions can more likely lead to workers fleeing. Domestic workers I spoke to have described wanting to work and earn a living in decent conditions, it is often finding out
How Tanzanian domestic workers are 'enslaved' in Oman NEWS » | IPPMEDIA...
that their conditions are less than promised, and when they are overworked or abused, that they risk escape. Moreover, no one should be seeking to create an environment of fear, intimidation, and violence, in their home.
Oman should reform its kafala system to allow migrant domestic workers to leave and change employers without permission, and introduce legal protections to guarantee domestic workers rights. Employers should also be trained on providing decent working conditions which would not only protect workers but increase healthier and long-term employment relationships. Domestic workers like “Atiya,” “Hidaya”, and “Basma” deserve to earn their promised salaries with decent working conditions.
As families in Oman increasingly rely on domestic workers, Oman should in turn make sure that domestic workers rights are made a reality.

How Tanzanian domestic workers are 'enslaved' in Oman NEWS » | IPPMEDIA...
 
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Hakuna uhuru wa kutoa maoni kabisa...si kwa wanahabari wala wanasiasa...yani hii nchi sijui inakwenda wapi...ukitoa taarifa unaitwa mchochezi...
Mpaka hata watumishi wa Mungu wanazuiwa mzee.
 
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- Watoto wa kike wafundishwe kuweka password katikati ya mapaja yao na sio kwenye simu tu

- Watoto wa kike wajifunze kubana mapaja (asante Mhe. mama Kikwete)

- Mabinti kupata mimba ni kiherehere chao (asante Mhe. Kikwete)

- Hakuna Elimu Bure kwa wanafunzi watakaopata mimba shuleni. Waende wakajifunze UJASIRIAMALI wainue uchumi wao ili waweze kujitunza na kutunza watoto wao (Asante Mhe. Magufuli)

Mwisho2
Hawa wadhungu na jamaa zao wa Haki za Binadamu si wangeanzisha mbadala kwa kusomesha hao watoto private schools badala ya kuendeleza propaganda za hovyo. Au ndio wanataka watoto wetu wafanye Mapenzi ya jinsia moja na watu wafanye sex hata barabarani kama wanyama bila kusahau mitaala yao ya kinyama yenye kuelezea mapenzi na wanyama na kuwaacha watoto na vijana wawake tamaa ili kujua ukuaji wa miili yao.

Hii ofisi inatumiwa na kuzimu maana mambo yanayofanyika dini zote zinakataza yaani waislamu na wakristo.

Hebu mtupishe nyie ni lango la kuzimu.

Tuendeleeni kuombea watoto wetu.
Queen Esther
 
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Tulishaambiwa mpango na mkakati wa mabepari kutumia taasisi fulani fulani kuichafua Tanzania..tumeshayaona sana na huu ni muendelezo tu..mwisho wa siku wajinga ndiyo waliwao.
Tusiwe wajinga wa kuaminishwa maneno yasiyo na uthibitisho. Tunatakiwa kuangalia yaliyoandikwa, yapo au hayapo?

Ni siasa za kiwendawazimu kuacha kujibu hoja na kukimbilia kusema eti kuna mawakala wa mabepari. Ni mabepari ndio waliosema wavunje misingi ya haki za binadamu, tena ambayo tumeweka kwenye katiba yetu?
 
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Peleka upuuzi mbali, unadhani hatuoni kwa macho yetu mpaka hizo taasisi ziseme? Hizo taasisi zinachofanya ni kupigia jibu mstari basi, tena mengine wameyaacha.
Jicho lako si Tundu Lisu hahahahaaa!
 
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Tusiwe wajinga wa kuaminishwa maneno yasiyo na uthibitisho. Tunatakiwa kuangalia yaliyoandikwa, yapo au hayapo?

Ni siasa za kiwendawazimu kuacha kujibu hoja na kukimbilia kusema eti kuna mawakala wa mabepari. Ni mabepari ndio waliosema wavunje misingi ya haki za binadamu, tena ambayo tumeweka kwenye katiba yetu?
Na usiwe mpumbavu wa kuamini kila anachosema mwanasiasa hasa "Greedy Politicians".

Umenena vyema kwenye sentensi yako ya kwanza. Sasa nikuulize? Tundu Lisu na Lema wameshawahi kukuthibitishia pasi na shaka kuwa serikali ndiyo inayoua watu na kuwatupa baharani??????

Au huwa wanakutengezea hisia na kukuacha wewe ukiangaika na nafsi yako???

Ujinga Sumu
 
tindo

tindo

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tindo

tindo

JF-Expert Member
Joined Sep 28, 2011
14,630 17,982 280
Na usiwe mpumbavu wa kuamini kila anachosema mwanasiasa hasa "Greedy Politicians".

Umenena vyema kwenye sentensi yako ya kwanza. Sasa nikuulize? Tundu Lisu na Lema wameshawahi kukuthibitishia pasi na shaka kuwa serikali ndiyo inayoua watu na kuwatupa baharani??????

Au huwa wanakutengezea hisia na kukuacha wewe ukiangaika na nafsi yako???

Ujinga Sumu
Unadhani sisi ni watoto hatuna uwezo wa kufahamu mambo mpaka Lissu ama Lema waseme ndio tufahamu. Hao akina Lissu wanasema kutokana na nafasi zao lakini haimaanishi wao ndio tumewakabidhi ufahamu wetu.

Ww ndio umekabidhi ufahamu wako kwa kina Magufuli ambao walikuwa mawaziri na wabunge awamu iliyopita wakikuimbisha kama mwehu kuhusu uchumi wa gas na muarubaini wa nishati nchi. Leo hakuna anayeongelea gas amebadili mdundo anazungumzia umeme wa maji, na ww unajichekelesha mbele ya wanaume eti tumepata rais tuliyekuwa tunamngoja. Kwanini kama unajitambua usiulize kwanini umeme wa maji huku gas ikitelekezwa bila maelezo ya kina?
 
rasilimali watu

rasilimali watu

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rasilimali watu

rasilimali watu

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Joined Apr 20, 2017
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Mmepewa hela ya matibabu ya LISSU au ndio mnabembeleza??
 

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