Germany Agents lands in Tanzania to assess Covid-19 Impact

gachacha

JF-Expert Member
Jul 12, 2015
1,463
2,000
Bado wanahangaika na Corona hawa mabeberu, wapinzani wenyewe wanajua hamna Corona Tanzania wanahangaika na magufuri kumtoa chamwino
 

Wacha1

JF-Expert Member
Dec 21, 2009
15,476
2,000
1598636296085.png

Credit: Edward Qorro in Arusha (Daily News)

TANZANIA'S decision to reopen its skies is now paying dividends after the East African nation registered a record tourist's arrival since June 1 this year.

According to Tanzania National Parks (TANAPA) Assistant Conservation Commissioner in charge of the business development portfolio Ms Beatrice Kessy, the country has received more than 30,000 visitors since July, this year. She added that by Monday, last week, a total of over 8,000 tourists landed in the country, an indication that the 2bn US dollars sector was slowly but surely bouncing back in the wake of the Covid-19 Pandemic.

Ms Kessy further revealed that three national parks, namely the Serengeti, Manyara and Kilimanjaro had the most tourist distribution since the KLM Royal Dutch Airlines landed at the Kilimanjaro International Airport (KIA) earlier this month, with more than 177 tourists who are here to enjoy the country's abundant tourist attractions.

Expounding on the distribution before members of the press on Tuesday, Ms Kessy said northern tourism circuit based parks attracted 7,811, 1,987 and 1,676 tourists, respectively.

Other parks including Ibanda and Mahale national parks drew only 7 and 6 visitors, respectively. Ms Kessy noted that the sector was badly hit the day the first Coronavirus case was reported in the country, mid-March.

"From 1,700 plus tourists we would thereafter receive a mere four tourists," she explained.

It would even become worse as TANAPA would host only three visitors in all of its parks. She attributed such a decline to travel restrictions from major markets, including the United States of America.

According to Ms Kessy, the recovery plan initiated by the conservation agency through guidelines rolled out by the World Tourism Organisation of the United Nations (UNWTO) contributed to the sector's impressive recovery. "TANAPA was, from the guidelines, able to come up with its own recovery plan which included product diversification in a bid to attract new segments of tourists visiting Tanzania," she said.

This also involved the review of tariffs especially on multiple entries as a way of luring in more tourists to the country. Some of the new products identified by the conservation agency are fishing, game viewing, wildlife orphanages, zipline and virtual tourism which will be introduced in Serengeti National Park.

In the same vein, Assistant Conservation Commissioner in charge of the Business Development described the Pandemic as a 'Blessing in disguise' as some tour operators were now rolling out packages that promote domestic tourism to make up for the lost time and money.

"Some had in earnest started selling domestic tourism packages and it truly worked for them, they were served good lessons and started thinking outside the box," she added.

Safi sana, Tanzania ni salama.
 

mama D

JF-Expert Member
Nov 22, 2010
6,691
2,000
Credit: Edward Qorro in Arusha (Daily News)

TANZANIA'S decision to reopen its skies is now paying dividends after the East African nation registered a record tourist's arrival since June 1 this year.

According to Tanzania National Parks (TANAPA) Assistant Conservation Commissioner in charge of the business development portfolio Ms Beatrice Kessy, the country has received more than 30,000 visitors since July, this year. She added that by Monday, last week, a total of over 8,000 tourists landed in the country, an indication that the 2bn US dollars sector was slowly but surely bouncing back in the wake of the Covid-19 Pandemic.

Ms Kessy further revealed that three national parks, namely the Serengeti, Manyara and Kilimanjaro had the most tourist distribution since the KLM Royal Dutch Airlines landed at the Kilimanjaro International Airport (KIA) earlier this month, with more than 177 tourists who are here to enjoy the country's abundant tourist attractions.

Expounding on the distribution before members of the press on Tuesday, Ms Kessy said northern tourism circuit based parks attracted 7,811, 1,987 and 1,676 tourists, respectively.

Other parks including Ibanda and Mahale national parks drew only 7 and 6 visitors, respectively. Ms Kessy noted that the sector was badly hit the day the first Coronavirus case was reported in the country, mid-March.

"From 1,700 plus tourists we would thereafter receive a mere four tourists," she explained.

It would even become worse as TANAPA would host only three visitors in all of its parks. She attributed such a decline to travel restrictions from major markets, including the United States of America.

According to Ms Kessy, the recovery plan initiated by the conservation agency through guidelines rolled out by the World Tourism Organisation of the United Nations (UNWTO) contributed to the sector's impressive recovery. "TANAPA was, from the guidelines, able to come up with its own recovery plan which included product diversification in a bid to attract new segments of tourists visiting Tanzania," she said.

This also involved the review of tariffs especially on multiple entries as a way of luring in more tourists to the country. Some of the new products identified by the conservation agency are fishing, game viewing, wildlife orphanages, zipline and virtual tourism which will be introduced in Serengeti National Park.

In the same vein, Assistant Conservation Commissioner in charge of the Business Development described the Pandemic as a 'Blessing in disguise' as some tour operators were now rolling out packages that promote domestic tourism to make up for the lost time and money.

"Some had in earnest started selling domestic tourism packages and it truly worked for them, they were served good lessons and started thinking outside the box," she added.

Safi sana, Tanzania ni salama.
John Pombe Magufuli rais jasiri mwenye maono na imani kuu, dunia inatambua hilo
 

Wacha1

JF-Expert Member
Dec 21, 2009
15,476
2,000
Discovering an overlooked gem in Tanzania
Credit: Dorine Reinstein

Discovering an overlooked gem in Tanzania

1598690014267.png

Tanzania is one of the handful of countries that has opened its borders to international travellers. Whereas most will likely explore the possibility of catching a glimpse of the wildebeest migration in the Serengeti, there are other worthwhile places to discover in Tanzania.

Ruaha National Park, with its beautiful landscapes dotted with baobabs, is one of Tanzania's best-kept secrets. Located to the west of the Selous Game Reserve, it is one of the largest national parks in Africa and has an incredibly rich flora and fauna, but its location is quite remote and untouched. This means there are far fewer tourists than the Selous and the Serengeti.

It is home to huge elephant populations, with an estimated 12,000 elephants moving through the park each year. Ruaha safaris also have reliably exciting predator concentrations: It is home to 10% of the world's lion population, contains one of four cheetah populations in East Africa and has the third-largest wild dog population in the world.

What makes this park truly unique, though, is the combination of Eastern and Southern African ecoregions and wildlife. It is one of only a few places in Africa where travellers will be able to see all types of kudus as well as Grant's gazelles, elands, oribis, giraffes, zebras, waterbucks, bushbucks, impalas, vast herds of Cape buffaloes and rare antelopes, such as sables and roans.

For birders, the park features over 580 bird varieties. This includes fish eagles, Eleanora's falcons, goliath herons, crested barbets and black-collared lovebirds. Ruaha also boasts endemic species such as the Tanzanian red-billed hornbill and serves as an important habitat for several critically endangered vulture populations.

Because Ruaha is quite inaccessible, there are only a handful of accommodation options. The good news is that boutique bush camp operator Hodi Hodi will soon open the private Ruaha Bush Camp on the edge of Ruaha National Park. The camp will welcome its first guests in October, with Covid-19 precautions in place.

1598690064766.png

Ruaha Bush Camp, situated on the edge of the Ruaha National Park, is slated to open this fall.

The camp is situated about five miles outside the park, on the border of the wildlife management area. Accommodations consist of four double and two family canvas tents on teak decks, each offering incredible views. The bar, dining area and lounge overlook a waterhole. All produce is bought from local farms, in line with the camp's buy local, employ local policy. Ruaha Bush Camp is also fully solar-powered, ensuring travelers have lights, hot water and cold drinks at all times.

Activities offered by the camp include full-day game drives into the park, leisurely sundowners watching the evening visitors to the waterhole; hot-air balloon rides above the Mwagusi River; visits to the authentic Maasai cattle-trading market and nearby HeHe villages to see traditional lifestyle; and guided bush walks around a 100-acre private game area. Agents should email info@hodi-hodi.com for rates. The website Hodi-Hodi.com has more information about Hodi Hodi, the camp's sustainability and community policies as well as list prices.

AndBeyond also offers a few camps in the Ruaha National Park. Jongomero Camp, a classic luxury tented camp, is situated along the flourishing banks of the seasonal Jongomero Sand River in the wilderness of Ruaha National Park. From Jongomero, travelers can embark on a one- or two-day fly-camping adventure in the park, an expedition on foot that enables them to get right up close to the wildlife.

Like the Selous Game Reserve, Ruaha is a classic dry season park. Game gets progressively better toward the end of the dry season as the waterholes and rivers dry up and the game concentrates around water. Like the Selous, travelling to Ruaha out of season will virtually guarantee that you see no other people while on safari and there are pockets in the park where the game concentrations are good at any time of the year. The birding from December to March is exceptional.

Safi sana Watanzania tuchangamkie kutembelea mbuga zetu pamoja na familia zetu.
 

salari

JF-Expert Member
Jan 22, 2013
763
1,000
Mungu mkubwa,chadema watapinga nakudai government inaficha takwimu,sijui tuamini takwimu zipi,za hawa pingapinga au za government

Nachukua sana uwepo wa vyama vya upinzani maana vinaturudisha nyuma kimaendeleo

Sent from my TECNO KB7j using JamiiForums mobile app
vyama vya upinzani vimeanza 1992, kabla ya hapo kwa nini Tanzania haikuwa imeendelea? vyama vya upinzani vinarudishaje nyuma maendeleo maana ccm ndiyo yenye kila kitu na inajitapa kuwa ni chama dola
 

Wacha1

JF-Expert Member
Dec 21, 2009
15,476
2,000
Hawa watu wana roho za ajabu mnoo. Walivyokua wanatamani maiti za waliokufa kwa COVID19 zitapakae barabarani. Kama vile wao wasingekufa. Sijui huwa wanatumia nini kuwaza
Na bado wanaendelea kufa, aana awamu ya pili imeanza kisa hawataki kujifukiza .... .... ie hawataki ushauri kutoka Tanzania.

BTW umeona Lufthansa na KLM wanaanza direct flights to Zanzibar kabla ya kutua Bandari Salama na kurudi Ulaya kuanzia Nov/Dec. Tanzania kumenoga.
 

Wacha1

JF-Expert Member
Dec 21, 2009
15,476
2,000

SKyUp Airlines, a charter company from Ukraine landed in Zanzibar today with over 200 tourists. They will spend five days in the beautiful Island of Zanzibar​


1603570749711.png


1603570772024.png


1603570788929.png


1603570807333.png


Tanzania inaendelea kugh'ara katika utalii.
 

Wacha1

JF-Expert Member
Dec 21, 2009
15,476
2,000

On safari in Tanzania, the country that tackled Covid with lemon, ginger and prayer​


Credit: Sarah Marshall

Rather than ‘follow the science’, Tanzania’s 120-plus tribes turned to their own medical cabinets in the bush -

Early in the pandemic, President John Magufuli made the controversial decision to ignore lockdowns, leading the country to be dubbed the Sweden of Africa. Herd immunity, however, wasn’t the core motivation; under an authoritarian government, where citizens are compelled to toe the line, it was more a case of following the herd.

Borders have remained open, there are no testing requirements for entry, and anyone is allowed in. It sounds like a melting pot for a Covid casserole, but extraordinarily, official figures suggest there have been only 509 cases and 21 deaths – although those statistics haven’t been updated since May. Surprisingly, for a country that believes the virus packed its bags months ago, there are still safety protocols in place: temperature checks, social distancing and masks were all required in Dar es Salaam airport when I arrived.

I found it reassuring to know that even though the pandemic wasn’t ruling people’s lives, a lack of safety measures hadn’t put them at risk. Just like the virus, it seemed most Tanzanians had moved on.

1605902023006.png


John Magufuli refused to keep the country locked down - Getty​

“We prayed it away,” insisted my local guide, David, as we drove from Kilimanjaro to Arusha. “Most people rely on chemicals and medicine, but there are far greater powers.” Rather than ‘follow the science’, Tanzania’s 120-plus tribes turned to their own medical cabinets in the bush – burning incense, concocting remedies and brewing teas.

City-dwellers were also advised to adopt tried-and-tested homeopathic methods, sending sales of lemon and ginger through the roof. “If we have flu, we don’t go to the doctor. We just go to the farm,” laughed David. “We don’t care too much about hygiene either; that helps with immunity too.”

In Arusha, I witnessed scenes I’d long forgotten in Europe: crowds squeezing through market stalls; bars spilling with noisy revellers; friends greeting each other with hugs in the street. No-one was wearing a mask.
“You’d feel shy if you went into a village with one on,” explained David.

1605902085865.png

Street art in Dar es Salaam. Few people wear masks, however - Getty​


Tourists to Tanzania, however, exist in a parallel universe. At Asilia’s Sayari camp in the north of the Serengeti National Park, all members of staff wore face coverings. A hand sanitizer station was positioned at the entrance, meals were served individually to allow social distancing, and most guests were fortunate enough to have their own private vehicles. (Passenger numbers have been reduced to a maximum of four, and a lucky few get to game drive solo at no extra cost.)

Even the layout of the revamped camp fits the ‘new safari normal’: spread like an eagle’s outstretched wings, tents extend two sides of a communal area featuring the world’s first craft brewery in the bush. Yes, that’s right, even if pubs are locked down at home – you can still get a pint on tap here.

Many of the seasonal mobile camps that would usually set up along the Mara river have chosen not to open this year, meaning the only crowds I encountered during my stay were dense clusters of wildebeest.

1605902152288.png


A family of wildebeest - Getty​

When 3,000 of the indecisive gnus finally crashed down dusty banks and across the river, I was one of only 15 people within splashing distance. Twelve months ago, a thunder of hooves would have been eclipsed by the roaring of engines jostling for position. Now that wasn’t the case.

“For a crossing like this, there would usually be around 70 vehicles,” shrugged young Maasai guide Moinga, clearly relieved he could concentrate on the wildlife rather than having to manoeuvre for a decent view. Other animal encounters were also intimate on a scale I imagine only Attenborough’s film crews get to experience; we solo scouted a tumble of kopjes to find lions perched on granite thrones, and redefined three’s a crowd when tracking mating leopards for two days.

In the Central Serengeti, typically a log jam of self-drivers, guides were forced to use their own skills to pan the never-ending plains, rather than lazily relying on parked vehicles to locate animals. One morning, it was so quiet I even watched a pangolin cross the road.

While the absence of crowds is a boon for those who do travel, it’s had a devastating impact on local people’s lives. The fact I was the sole occupant at Elewana Pioneer Camp – a nostalgic, 12-tent property tucked into a rocky outcrop, where screeching hyrax huddle in crevices and overwhelming views stretch into a hazy horizon – would have obvious long-term implications.

1605902199575.png


Tourists have the wildlife to themselves right now - Getty​

“It’s been quiet this year,” sighed genteel manager Rodgers. “The company will need to look at retrenchment soon.” Ever resourceful, many Tanzanians have set up ‘corona businesses’ as a substitute for lost income – side-lines in keeping chickens, growing vegetables or cultivating crops. This type of subsistence living has essentially kept people alive.

Not that death has been knocking on every door. Admittedly, I’d half expected to unveil dark tales of body-bags in streets and secret burials. But aside from rumours of an increase in the number of pneumonia cases, any mass conspiracy to cover up deaths has never transpired. “We live in small communities,” one guide pointed out. “If people were dying or going into hospital, we’d know about it.”

Not everyone buys into the idea low infection rates are purely down to divine intervention, though. One plausible explanation lies in demographics. In a population where the median age is 17.7, there are few elderly people; those who manage to survive into their 60s rarely move far from rural homes.

But there’s also a major element of luck.

“Our government took a big risk,” one guide, who preferred to remain anonymous, told me. “This is a hand-to-mouth economy, so in many ways they had no choice; a lockdown would have resulted in widespread poverty.” It appears the gamble has paid off. Tanzania’s economy could register one of the highest growth rates in the world for 2020, according to predictions by the IMF. Tourists are also slowly returning, with the East African country topping the list of African enquiries for operator Abercrombie & Kent. And, thanks to the responsible interventions of lodges and hotels, going on a safari there need not involve any extra Covid risk.

So far, Tanzania has miraculously escaped the grip of the pandemic – even if it’s been on a wing and 72 hours of prayer.

1605902250698.png


Many combine a safari in Tanzania with a trip to Zanzibar - Getty
Just for a moment imagine if JPM was a president of one of the European Countries.
 

Wacha1

JF-Expert Member
Dec 21, 2009
15,476
2,000
Toeni maelezo kwa Beberu, hela za COVID 19 mlizitumiaje?
Waliotoa fedha wao, wewe inakuuma nini? Maswali kwanini walitoa hizo pesa wajiulize wao wenyewe. As far as we know, JPM refused any finance in regard to Covid-19. JPM said at that time ''Its better for them (lenders) to forgo the debts we pay. Kenya and other countries borrowed more money not Tanzania. If EU gave us any money they should question themselves.
 

Sky Eclat

JF-Expert Member
Oct 17, 2012
47,304
2,000
Waliotoa fedha wao, wewe inakuuma nini? Maswali kwanini walitoa hizo pesa wajiulize wao wenyewe. As far as we know, JPM refused any finance in regard to Covid-19. JPM said at that time ''Its better for them (lenders) to forgo the debts we pay. Kenya and other countries borrowed more money not Tanzania. If EU gave us any money they should question themselves.
Mlizipokea sasa Beberu anataka maelezo.
 

Toa taarifa ya maudhui yasiyofaa!

Kuna taarifa umeiona humu JamiiForums na haifai kubaki mtandaoni?
Fanya hivi...

Umesahau Password au akaunti yako?

Unapata ugumu kuikumbuka akaunti yako? Unakwama kuanzisha akaunti?
Contact us

Similar Discussions

Top Bottom