A pan-African stand must be taken against political oppression in Tanzania

BAK

JF-Expert Member
Feb 11, 2007
109,906
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It is 59 years since Tanzania, a country that pioneered pan-Africanism, liberated herself from colonialism and struck her own path in defining freedom and independence. When the history of pan-Africanism is written, Tanzania is among the countries that are celebrated as a touchstone of liberation. As a result, many Africans, Americans and the Caribbean’s nationalist and freedom fighters made political pilgrimage and permanently settled in Tanzania.

Mwalimu Julius Nyerere, among other great founders, is celebrated for leading and championing the liberation of the Africa continent, leaving a legacy to emulate and a country to look to for inspiration and the rejuvenation of pan-African solidarity.

With less than two weeks to Tanzania’s 12th general election, the reports coming from Tanzania are saddening. President John Pombe Magufuli’s contest for a second five-year term has returned the country to the political suppression and oppression of the colonial years. It is painful to watch a country which was once a beacon of freedom and symbol of peace accelerating to autocracy.

According to the Lawfare in Tanzania’s General Election report released by Amnesty International on 12 October, the authoritarian and dictatorial governance exercised by Magufuli includes individuals and organisations critical of the government being threatened, harassed and intimidated, along with their human and constitutional rights being transgressed. Deprose Muchena, Amnesty International’s director for East and Southern Africa, describes the situation in Tanzania as the “weaponisation of law in the violation of human rights”.

A raft of laws have been formulated to silence opposition parties, the media and civil society organisations, including those who defend women’s human rights. They have been risking arbitrary arrests, detentions, assaults and the deregistration of organisations for demanding that the elections on 28 October are free and fair.

The laws are designed to protect and advance the campaigns and political engagements of the ruling party. This leaves a lot to be desired regarding how free and fair the elections will be.

It is depressing to read of the atrocities meted out to human rights defenders, women’s rights organisations and women candidates for presumed loyalty to opposition parties and for condemning lawfare of the government. The government is using its machinery to suppress the right to freedom of choice and association and equal participation in elections.


This is a sad reality to this generation, an anticlimax to Africa’s journey to liberation as envisaged by our forebears, a bruise to the dream of achieving gender equality and women’s empowerment 25 years after the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action (BDPfA) was adopted. It is a time to re-awaken the clarion call and put pressure on African governments to deliver commitments made to women towards attaining gender equality and equal representation in political leadership.

Tanzania is demonstrating how oppressive and autocratic governments will do anything to retain their power. We must never forget that our societies are structured around power imbalances, which themselves are structured around the axes of gender, class, race and ability. As we fight these oppressive structures we must connect our collective struggles. Therefore, it is necessary to address those issues as a whole system of arbitrary discrimination used to justify unbalanced power struggles and inequalities for democratic expression. The oppressive system and its structures are part of a wider system of patriarchy and “strong men” who are determined to maintain and accumulate self-enhancing, privileges and power.

What is happening in Tanzania should serve as a wake-up call for all Africans, the African Union and international organisations to join hands and condemn the resurgence of human rights violations.


In the words of Martin Luther King, “In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friend.” We Africans should not remain silent about what is happening in Tanzania, because silence serves the oppressor.

It is time to live the true spirit of ubuntu (I am, because you are). As Nyerere would say: “Sisi ni wamoja, na Afrika ni moja [we are united in our Africaness]”.

We need to address our displeasure in the way elections are organised and managed in Tanzania. Denying its citizen their autonomy and right to choose their leaders is against democratic principles, feminist principle and human decency.

We may not be physically present in Tanzania, but we are watching. We cannot remain mute when Tanzania is bleeding and crying out for our solidarity. As many voices continue to be silenced, we know that there are bold and courageous sisters and brothers who are not relenting in this struggle. We stand by them, and we stand by the spirit of pan-Africanism.

Africa must rise for Tanzania.


Aluta Continua!

Memory Kachambwa is the executive director of African Women’s Development and Communication Network.
 

Mshana Jr

Platinum Member
Aug 19, 2012
156,668
2,000
It is 59 years since Tanzania, a country that pioneered pan-Africanism, liberated herself from colonialism and struck her own path in defining freedom and independence. When the history of pan-Africanism is written, Tanzania is among the countries that are celebrated as a touchstone of liberation. As a result, many Africans, Americans and the Caribbean’s nationalist and freedom fighters made political pilgrimage and permanently settled in Tanzania.

Mwalimu Julius Nyerere, among other great founders, is celebrated for leading and championing the liberation of the Africa continent, leaving a legacy to emulate and a country to look to for inspiration and the rejuvenation of pan-African solidarity.

With less than two weeks to Tanzania’s 12th general election, the reports coming from Tanzania are saddening. President John Pombe Magufuli’s contest for a second five-year term has returned the country to the political suppression and oppression of the colonial years. It is painful to watch a country which was once a beacon of freedom and symbol of peace accelerating to autocracy.

According to the Lawfare in Tanzania’s General Election report released by Amnesty International on 12 October, the authoritarian and dictatorial governance exercised by Magufuli includes individuals and organisations critical of the government being threatened, harassed and intimidated, along with their human and constitutional rights being transgressed. Deprose Muchena, Amnesty International’s director for East and Southern Africa, describes the situation in Tanzania as the “weaponisation of law in the violation of human rights”.

A raft of laws have been formulated to silence opposition parties, the media and civil society organisations, including those who defend women’s human rights. They have been risking arbitrary arrests, detentions, assaults and the deregistration of organisations for demanding that the elections on 28 October are free and fair.

The laws are designed to protect and advance the campaigns and political engagements of the ruling party. This leaves a lot to be desired regarding how free and fair the elections will be.

It is depressing to read of the atrocities meted out to human rights defenders, women’s rights organisations and women candidates for presumed loyalty to opposition parties and for condemning lawfare of the government. The government is using its machinery to suppress the right to freedom of choice and association and equal participation in elections.


This is a sad reality to this generation, an anticlimax to Africa’s journey to liberation as envisaged by our forebears, a bruise to the dream of achieving gender equality and women’s empowerment 25 years after the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action (BDPfA) was adopted. It is a time to re-awaken the clarion call and put pressure on African governments to deliver commitments made to women towards attaining gender equality and equal representation in political leadership.

Tanzania is demonstrating how oppressive and autocratic governments will do anything to retain their power. We must never forget that our societies are structured around power imbalances, which themselves are structured around the axes of gender, class, race and ability. As we fight these oppressive structures we must connect our collective struggles. Therefore, it is necessary to address those issues as a whole system of arbitrary discrimination used to justify unbalanced power struggles and inequalities for democratic expression. The oppressive system and its structures are part of a wider system of patriarchy and “strong men” who are determined to maintain and accumulate self-enhancing, privileges and power.

What is happening in Tanzania should serve as a wake-up call for all Africans, the African Union and international organisations to join hands and condemn the resurgence of human rights violations.


In the words of Martin Luther King, “In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friend.” We Africans should not remain silent about what is happening in Tanzania, because silence serves the oppressor.

It is time to live the true spirit of ubuntu (I am, because you are). As Nyerere would say: “Sisi ni wamoja, na Afrika ni moja [we are united in our Africaness]”.

We need to address our displeasure in the way elections are organised and managed in Tanzania. Denying its citizen their autonomy and right to choose their leaders is against democratic principles, feminist principle and human decency.

We may not be physically present in Tanzania, but we are watching. We cannot remain mute when Tanzania is bleeding and crying out for our solidarity. As many voices continue to be silenced, we know that there are bold and courageous sisters and brothers who are not relenting in this struggle. We stand by them, and we stand by the spirit of pan-Africanism.

Africa must rise for Tanzania.


Aluta Continua!

Memory Kachambwa is the executive director of African Women’s Development and Communication Network.
We may not be physically present in Tanzania, but we are watching. We cannot remain mute when Tanzania is bleeding and crying out for our solidarity. As many voices continue to be silenced, we know that there are bold and courageous sisters and brothers who are not relenting in this struggle. We stand by them, and we stand by the spirit of pan-Africanism.
 

BAK

JF-Expert Member
Feb 11, 2007
109,906
2,000
Kungekuwa na sheria halali basi huyo anayejiita MWENDAWAZIMU asingeyatamka haya
Na aliyeokotwa jalalani asingetoa kauli kama hii. Bunge lipi hilo Bunge UCHWARA Bunge UDHAIFU. Acha KUKURUPUKA kama huna la maana la kuandika.
Sheria za Tanzania zilizopitishwa na Bunge halali la Jamhuri ya Muungano wa Tanzania, hazihitaji kuhalalishwa na jumuiya au kikundi chochote cha ndani au nje ya nchi.
 

1954

JF-Expert Member
Nov 14, 2006
8,983
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It is 59 years since Tanzania, a country that pioneered pan-Africanism, liberated herself from colonialism and struck her own path in defining freedom and independence. When the history of pan-Africanism is written, Tanzania is among the countries that are celebrated as a touchstone of liberation. As a result, many Africans, Americans and the Caribbean’s nationalist and freedom fighters made political pilgrimage and permanently settled in Tanzania.

Mwalimu Julius Nyerere, among other great founders, is celebrated for leading and championing the liberation of the Africa continent, leaving a legacy to emulate and a country to look to for inspiration and the rejuvenation of pan-African solidarity.

With less than two weeks to Tanzania’s 12th general election, the reports coming from Tanzania are saddening. President John Pombe Magufuli’s contest for a second five-year term has returned the country to the political suppression and oppression of the colonial years. It is painful to watch a country which was once a beacon of freedom and symbol of peace accelerating to autocracy.

According to the Lawfare in Tanzania’s General Election report released by Amnesty International on 12 October, the authoritarian and dictatorial governance exercised by Magufuli includes individuals and organisations critical of the government being threatened, harassed and intimidated, along with their human and constitutional rights being transgressed. Deprose Muchena, Amnesty International’s director for East and Southern Africa, describes the situation in Tanzania as the “weaponisation of law in the violation of human rights”.

A raft of laws have been formulated to silence opposition parties, the media and civil society organisations, including those who defend women’s human rights. They have been risking arbitrary arrests, detentions, assaults and the deregistration of organisations for demanding that the elections on 28 October are free and fair.

The laws are designed to protect and advance the campaigns and political engagements of the ruling party. This leaves a lot to be desired regarding how free and fair the elections will be.

It is depressing to read of the atrocities meted out to human rights defenders, women’s rights organisations and women candidates for presumed loyalty to opposition parties and for condemning lawfare of the government. The government is using its machinery to suppress the right to freedom of choice and association and equal participation in elections.


This is a sad reality to this generation, an anticlimax to Africa’s journey to liberation as envisaged by our forebears, a bruise to the dream of achieving gender equality and women’s empowerment 25 years after the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action (BDPfA) was adopted. It is a time to re-awaken the clarion call and put pressure on African governments to deliver commitments made to women towards attaining gender equality and equal representation in political leadership.

Tanzania is demonstrating how oppressive and autocratic governments will do anything to retain their power. We must never forget that our societies are structured around power imbalances, which themselves are structured around the axes of gender, class, race and ability. As we fight these oppressive structures we must connect our collective struggles. Therefore, it is necessary to address those issues as a whole system of arbitrary discrimination used to justify unbalanced power struggles and inequalities for democratic expression. The oppressive system and its structures are part of a wider system of patriarchy and “strong men” who are determined to maintain and accumulate self-enhancing, privileges and power.

What is happening in Tanzania should serve as a wake-up call for all Africans, the African Union and international organisations to join hands and condemn the resurgence of human rights violations.


In the words of Martin Luther King, “In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friend.” We Africans should not remain silent about what is happening in Tanzania, because silence serves the oppressor.

It is time to live the true spirit of ubuntu (I am, because you are). As Nyerere would say: “Sisi ni wamoja, na Afrika ni moja [we are united in our Africaness]”.

We need to address our displeasure in the way elections are organised and managed in Tanzania. Denying its citizen their autonomy and right to choose their leaders is against democratic principles, feminist principle and human decency.

We may not be physically present in Tanzania, but we are watching. We cannot remain mute when Tanzania is bleeding and crying out for our solidarity. As many voices continue to be silenced, we know that there are bold and courageous sisters and brothers who are not relenting in this struggle. We stand by them, and we stand by the spirit of pan-Africanism.

Africa must rise for Tanzania.


Aluta Continua!

Memory Kachambwa is the executive director of African Women’s Development and Communication Network.
Her surname tells it all
 

Retired

JF-Expert Member
Jul 22, 2016
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I am afraid, if USA or any other democratic super power does not come forward and threaten to depose Jiwe from office, dictators never heed to words!
In the words of Martin Luther King, “In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friend.” We Africans should not remain silent about what is happening in Tanzania, because silence serves the oppressor.
 
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BAK

JF-Expert Member
Feb 11, 2007
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1603598529553.jpeg

Naunga mkono hoja.
 

TUJITEGEMEE

JF-Expert Member
Nov 6, 2010
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I am afraid, if USA or any other democratic super power does not come forward and threaten to depose Jiwe from office, dictators never heed to words!
There is a need of re- defining the word " Dictator "regarding its 'all facets'!
 

BAK

JF-Expert Member
Feb 11, 2007
109,906
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Wacha ujinga wako pimbi wewe!
Zwazwa bak trh 28 utakuwa Bongo kupiga kura au kubeba box unaona ni muhimu zaidi? Watu kama nyinyi ndio mnamjaza mgombea wenu ujinga anaona ana wapiga kura wengi kumbe wengine ni makamanda wa mitandaoni
 

Wakudadavuwa

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Feb 17, 2016
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Hivi dogo bado upo Mbweni?
It is 59 years since Tanzania, a country that pioneered pan-Africanism, liberated herself from colonialism and struck her own path in defining freedom and independence. When the history of pan-Africanism is written, Tanzania is among the countries that are celebrated as a touchstone of liberation. As a result, many Africans, Americans and the Caribbean’s nationalist and freedom fighters made political pilgrimage and permanently settled in Tanzania.

Mwalimu Julius Nyerere, among other great founders, is celebrated for leading and championing the liberation of the Africa continent, leaving a legacy to emulate and a country to look to for inspiration and the rejuvenation of pan-African solidarity.

With less than two weeks to Tanzania’s 12th general election, the reports coming from Tanzania are saddening. President John Pombe Magufuli’s contest for a second five-year term has returned the country to the political suppression and oppression of the colonial years. It is painful to watch a country which was once a beacon of freedom and symbol of peace accelerating to autocracy.

According to the Lawfare in Tanzania’s General Election report released by Amnesty International on 12 October, the authoritarian and dictatorial governance exercised by Magufuli includes individuals and organisations critical of the government being threatened, harassed and intimidated, along with their human and constitutional rights being transgressed. Deprose Muchena, Amnesty International’s director for East and Southern Africa, describes the situation in Tanzania as the “weaponisation of law in the violation of human rights”.

A raft of laws have been formulated to silence opposition parties, the media and civil society organisations, including those who defend women’s human rights. They have been risking arbitrary arrests, detentions, assaults and the deregistration of organisations for demanding that the elections on 28 October are free and fair.

The laws are designed to protect and advance the campaigns and political engagements of the ruling party. This leaves a lot to be desired regarding how free and fair the elections will be.

It is depressing to read of the atrocities meted out to human rights defenders, women’s rights organisations and women candidates for presumed loyalty to opposition parties and for condemning lawfare of the government. The government is using its machinery to suppress the right to freedom of choice and association and equal participation in elections.


This is a sad reality to this generation, an anticlimax to Africa’s journey to liberation as envisaged by our forebears, a bruise to the dream of achieving gender equality and women’s empowerment 25 years after the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action (BDPfA) was adopted. It is a time to re-awaken the clarion call and put pressure on African governments to deliver commitments made to women towards attaining gender equality and equal representation in political leadership.

Tanzania is demonstrating how oppressive and autocratic governments will do anything to retain their power. We must never forget that our societies are structured around power imbalances, which themselves are structured around the axes of gender, class, race and ability. As we fight these oppressive structures we must connect our collective struggles. Therefore, it is necessary to address those issues as a whole system of arbitrary discrimination used to justify unbalanced power struggles and inequalities for democratic expression. The oppressive system and its structures are part of a wider system of patriarchy and “strong men” who are determined to maintain and accumulate self-enhancing, privileges and power.

What is happening in Tanzania should serve as a wake-up call for all Africans, the African Union and international organisations to join hands and condemn the resurgence of human rights violations.


In the words of Martin Luther King, “In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friend.” We Africans should not remain silent about what is happening in Tanzania, because silence serves the oppressor.

It is time to live the true spirit of ubuntu (I am, because you are). As Nyerere would say: “Sisi ni wamoja, na Afrika ni moja [we are united in our Africaness]”.

We need to address our displeasure in the way elections are organised and managed in Tanzania. Denying its citizen their autonomy and right to choose their leaders is against democratic principles, feminist principle and human decency.

We may not be physically present in Tanzania, but we are watching. We cannot remain mute when Tanzania is bleeding and crying out for our solidarity. As many voices continue to be silenced, we know that there are bold and courageous sisters and brothers who are not relenting in this struggle. We stand by them, and we stand by the spirit of pan-Africanism.

Africa must rise for Tanzania.


Aluta Continua!

Memory Kachambwa is the executive director of African Women’s Development and Communication Network.
 

Retired

JF-Expert Member
Jul 22, 2016
27,237
2,000
There is a need of re- defining the word " Dictator "regarding its 'all facets'!
That has already been defined by case laws and statutes and needs no more! Water elemental composition is H2O and will never be redefined!
 

Retired

JF-Expert Member
Jul 22, 2016
27,237
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Tanzania has done G.E 2020 without donors funds
Stupid, this has been done at the expense of wafanyabiashara kuwapora fedha zao na kuwalazimisha kukubali makosa ili waachiwe, by strangling other essential need of the community......, kodi za uonevu, and the like!
 

Bia yetu

JF-Expert Member
Apr 14, 2020
6,936
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Tanzania haiwezi kuongozwa na msaliti wa Nchi Lissu

Pia Tanzania hatutaki ushoga,
 

Jp Omuga

JF-Expert Member
Jan 16, 2012
4,264
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A major problem in African politics and governance system is that all incumbent leaders are in the same club of power mongers with none to officially rebuke or correct anyone...!!

It is therefore the duty of common wananchi to wake up and break loose from elite capture mechanisms...!!

Please continue to let Wananchis know that even gods will not do this for them if they don't take full responsibility to demand tangible and sustainable human security!!
 

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