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Wimbledon 2009

Discussion in 'Sports' started by Ng'wanza Madaso, Jun 29, 2009.

  1. Ng'wanza Madaso

    Ng'wanza Madaso JF-Expert Member

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    Venus Williams kamshinda kwa set 2 kwa 0 Ana Ivanovic SRB (13)
    Serena Williams mpaka sasa anaongoza kwa set 1kwa 0
    Roger Federer (1) mpaka sasa anaongoza kwa set 2 kwa 0 dhidi ya Soderlin.
    Yote inapatikana BBC 1, BBC 2,HD na online The Championships, Wimbledon 2009 - Grand Slam Tennis - Official Site by IBM
    Baada ya game ya Federer itafuatiwa na game ya Andy Murray.


    Tutaendelea kufahamishana kila linalojiri asanteni.
     
    Last edited: Jun 29, 2009
  2. Ng'wanza Madaso

    Ng'wanza Madaso JF-Expert Member

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    ROGER FEDERER Ameshinda kwa set 3 kwa 0 dhidi ya Soderling wa sweden
     
  3. Ng'wanza Madaso

    Ng'wanza Madaso JF-Expert Member

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    S.Williams leads D.Hantuchova 6-3 4-1
     
  4. Ng'wanza Madaso

    Ng'wanza Madaso JF-Expert Member

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    Serena Williams ameshinda kwa set 2 kwa 0 dhidi ya D.Hantuchova
     
  5. Ng'wanza Madaso

    Ng'wanza Madaso JF-Expert Member

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    Ana Ivanovic may have had worse days at the office than this, but not many. The 12th seed was all but blasted off No.1 Court in the first set by the tournament favourite and defending champion Venus Williams in their fourth round match.

    And at the start of the second, Ivanovic received prolonged treatment to an injury. She tried valiantly to continue but, sobbing with pain and disappointment, was forced to admit that she could not.

    The pity was that it all started so optimistically for Ivanovic. She came on court with the same light strapping to her right knee which has been in place throughout the tournament, and she seemed untroubled by it. Williams had by far the heavier strapping on her left leg, which appeared after her second round match last week.

    In the opening game, Williams' serve – the key to her grasscourt game, of course – was not quite in gear. The 21-year-old Serb was attacking brightly, and with a challenged linecall she brought up two break points. The first was wasted tamely, and ominously Venus saved the second with an unreturnable serve. But Ivanovic sent over a delicious dropshot for a third chance to break, and came close to making a lovely running forehand pass down the line – but the net denied her, and ultimately the five-times Wimbledon champion held.

    Keen to set the record straight, Venus at once went on the offensive herself, and an unforced backhand error gave her the break that had eluded Ivanovic. From there it was downhill for last year's French Open champion. Williams made short work of another break. Ivanovic had her chances but made errors at exactly the wrong time. Her first serve percentage was very good, but she was not converting it into points won.

    When she managed to get on the scoreboard at 5-1 the crowd gave her a sympathetic ovation but, to a champion's ears, sympathetic applause is not exactly the sweetest sound. Williams wrapped up the set in 30 minutes – her 30th consecutive victorious set at Wimbledon – and it was difficult to remember that Ivanovic is an ex-world number one.

    There was no visible moment when Ivanovic sustained her injury. She delivered an ace to save break point in the opening game of the second set, after which she put her hand to her groin and winced.

    With the score at deuce, she asked umpire Carlos Ramos to call the trainer, and walked gingerly back to her chair, appearing on the brink of tears. A 10-minute period of treatment followed, when a heavy strapping was applied to the inside of her left thigh.

    Play resumed and gallantly she managed another winning point, although she was clearly crying. She served out the game but was overcome with pain and, sobbing, was forced to concede the match.
     
  6. Ng'wanza Madaso

    Ng'wanza Madaso JF-Expert Member

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    Bingwa namba moja duniani kwa wanawake D.Safina yuko Centre court dhidi ya A.Mauresmo live BBC 1
     
  7. Ng'wanza Madaso

    Ng'wanza Madaso JF-Expert Member

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    Dinara Safina ameshinda kwa set 2 kwa 1 dhidi ya Amelie Mauresmo
     
  8. Ng'wanza Madaso

    Ng'wanza Madaso JF-Expert Member

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    A.Murray leads S.Wawrinka 2-6 6-3 6-3 5-7 6-3
     
  9. Ng'wanza Madaso

    Ng'wanza Madaso JF-Expert Member

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    Lleyton Hewitt, the 2002 Wimbledon champion, turned around a two-set deficit to reach his first Grand Slam quarter-final in three years. Having struggled through the first two sets against Radek Stepanek, he came back reinvigorated after a medical timeout, and even a break for rain could not stop him. Stepanek had injury problems of his own, and Hewitt emerged victorious 4-6, 2-6, 6-1, 6-2, 6-2 after two hours 54 minutes.
    The first two sets were not the match many were expecting from this encounter. Hewitt, now 28, arrived on No. 2 Court yet to drop a set in his previous three matches, with an encouraging Queen's campaign behind him in the build-up to this tournament. Moreover, the only Australian man to have made the main Wimbledon draw knew he could depend upon the usual highly visible and vocal Australian support at courtside.

    Stepanek, seeded 23, had endured two draining five-setters in his second and third round matches. During his win over David Ferrer on Saturday, he received prolonged treatment and took to the court today with his left knee lightly taped.

    And yet it was Stepanek who started the match full of energy. He was finding wonderful angles, now with a lunging backhand, next with a flick of the wrist on the forehand, and he broke Hewitt for 2-1. The Australian got it back on serve, but Stepanek moved clear again. Hewitt showed typical spirit in saving four set points but a fifth proved too much.

    Hewitt soon ran into trouble again in the second, and as before a break came for 1-2. Again he had chances to break back, but this time could not do it. Worse, Stepanek secured the double break for 4-1, whereupon Hewitt asked umpire Jake Garner to call for the trainer. In a medical timeout, Hewitt received treatment to the inside of his left thigh, which is of course the leg he drives off for almost every shot.

    "You can still do it, Lleyton!" called Australian voices from the crowd. But Stepanek served two love games to close out the set 6-2 – although they were punctuated by a love game from Hewitt. Perhaps that gave him encouragement. He seemed to be moving stiffly, but in the third set his play was unrecognisable. Newly energised, as light rain began falling on a humid afternoon, Hewitt forced his way to a 4-0 lead before the rain became heavier and play was suspended.

    The Australian supporters were in fine voice when play resumed 48 minutes later, singing: "We're going to win 3-2!" It was too soon to tell if Hewitt's momentum had been halted by the rain but he served out the set 6-1. But there was a fair indication at the start of the third that the impetus was still with him, when he broke Stepanek immediately.

    In a lengthy third game Hewitt broke again after which it appeared that the noisy Australian supporters were asked by officials to be perhaps a little less unbridled in their enthusiasm. At 5-2 it was Stepanek's turn to call the trainer, who applied a much heavier strapping above the Czech's left knee. But it could not stop Hewitt taking the set 6-2.

    At the changeover, the trainer gave Stepanek lower back massage, and applied more tape to his knee. Nonetheless, Hewitt broke to love at the start of the deciding set. He took the double break for 5-2, and when victory came he did his best to thank all his noisy supporters individually, handing out as many towels and wristbands as he could find.
     
  10. Ng'wanza Madaso

    Ng'wanza Madaso JF-Expert Member

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    The first match to be played in its entirety under a closed roof at Wimbledon turned out to be a classic as well as a marathon as Andy Murray staged a dramatic recovery to defeat Stanislas Wawrinka in five sets, 2-6 6-3 6-3 5-7 6-3, and gain a place in the quarter-finals for the second successive year.

    It took him just under four hours of draining commitment against a dogged and occasionally inspired opponent before, as his final forehand winner sped clear of Wawrinka's flailing racket, he fell to his knees in a mix of relief, joy and exhaustion. As he said immediately after the match, a deep sleep is now very much in order before he returns on Wednesday to face Spanish wild card Juan Carlos Ferrero in the quarter-final.

    The 3rd seed, under relentless pressure to become the first British player to win the Wimbledon men's crown for 73 years, had been in serious trouble early on against Wawrinka, the 24-year-old Swiss Davis Cup player who is seeded 19th.

    These two men are good friends and regular practice partners, but there was nothing friendly about the fashion in which Wawrinka went after Murray in that opening set, serving brilliantly and hammering ground strokes which reduced Murray to frustration.

    Murray was broken in the very first game and, to the dismay of the packed Centre Court, surrendered serve again as Wawrinka surged into a 4-0 lead. There was no reprieve as Wawrinka served out the set in 34 minutes and again launched into the Scot's serve in the second set. Perhaps the crucial moment of the match came in the fifth game of the second set, with Murray fending off a couple of break points and taking a massive boost from the upsurge of crowd support.

    Two games later Wawrinka called for the trainer, although he had not appeared in any obvious distress, and had his left thigh massaged. The treatment and delay may have alleviated any hurt, but it only served to inspire Murray. As the Swiss serve began to lose its pace and bite, the Scot pounced.

    He reached break point twice and the second time made it count as Wawrinka sent a backhand out of court. Serving out for the set to level the match was no problem with Murray in this mood and he clinched it with his second ace.

    The third set was a virtual repeat for Murray. Having fought off three break points in the fifth game, he immediately broke the Swiss, who put an easy forehand volley wide. Though he was not serving anywhere near his best at this stage, Murray was getting by on a rich mix of grit and skill and when he took the third set the momentum was clearly with him.

    Wawrinka took a toilet break in order to regroup and it seemed to do the trick. He was a threat to the Murray superiority in the fourth set, missing break points in the seventh and ninth games before capturing the Murray serve to lead 6-5. Before long, he had leveled a gripping match which was now being played under lights. The record for a late Wimbledon finish had long ago been shattered.

    Could Murray hold on in the fifth set? The crowd hoped so and Murray clearly thought so, going 3-0 ahead. But back came Wawrinka to level at 3-3 and at this stage the match could have swung to either man. In the end it fell Murray's way as, to a constant uproar, he had the Swiss on the defensive and broke for a 5-3 lead on his third break point.

    It was a nerve-racking time to serve out for a place in the last eight but Murray was up to it. That his nerves were also up to it was shown by the exquisite drop shot which put him two points from the match. He got to match point on a ball which clipped the baseline and then came that winning forehand.
     
  11. Ng'wanza Madaso

    Ng'wanza Madaso JF-Expert Member

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    Never say we never give you anything at the official Wimbledon website. In years to come, pub quizzes up and down the country will be won or lost on these two facts we are about to present to you gift wrapped and on a silver platter. Who won the first point on Centre Court when the roof was closed for the first time? Answer: Dinara Safina. And who won the first game when the roof was closed for the first time on Centre Court? Answer: Amelie Mauresmo.

    History was finally made at 5.19pm on Monday, June 29 when Mauresmo struck the first serve under the cover of "5,200 square metres of a very strong, flexible, translucent waterproof material" as the roof is described in the official literature.

    As luck would have it, it was not actually raining at the time but that was to be expected. From the moment the 123rd Championships started, the sun has been shining and even when the clouds have moved in, they have refused to leak on cue and allow the man with his finger poised over the button to try out the All England Club's new toy.

    For a couple of days now, we have all been wondering "will it, won't it rain?" and "will they, won't they close the roof?". And until 4.35pm on Monday, the answer had been a frustrating and infuriating "no". But that was the moment when the umpire, Kerrilyn Cramer (remember her name – she might be worth an extra point or two in that quiz), announced that play was suspended. The drizzle had become a little heavier. It was not a downpour but was it enough to try out the roof?

    Alas, no. Not at first. Only the faithful old green tarpaulin was hauled over the grass while the roof stayed put. Sue Barker reported in authoritative tones on the BBC that the head groundsman had assured her the roof would only be called into play if the rain was heavy. And it was anything but that.

    Still, there was an overwhelming feeling that someone, somewhere was desperate to give it a whirl. Go on, Bert, press the button. You know you want to.

    This Centre Court cover-up-tease (the opposite to a striptease) had started on Saturday night. Then the lightest of light rain had hovered over Andy Murray's match but it was not enough to cause the court-coverers concern. Murray wrapped up his match in double-quick time and the day's play was done on Centre Court.

    But just as people were filing out, the roof rolled into action, the lights came on and from the Tannoy came the announcement: "If the match on No.1 Court does not finish, there may be further play on Centre Court". But as everyone scratched their heads and tried to work out what was going on, the rain stubbornly refused get any heavier and Juan Carlos Ferrero polished off Fernando Gonzalez before darkness fell. No need to move anything under the roof.

    Mauresmo, the first on court, could not take her eyes off the roof above herBut as the Centre Court crowd sat and stared at the skies on Monday, suddenly the roof started to move. At 4.39pm, the two halves of the structure started to roll towards the middle of the court to gasps and cheers from below. And then it stopped. "I hope someone's kept the receipt," said one wag in the stands. Surely it cannot be broken? No, actually, the roof closes in the three stages with a slight pause between each phase. By 4.46pm the roof was finally shut and there was a huge round of applause. Outside, the drizzle had stopped.

    "Play will resume in 20 to 30 minutes once the referee is closed," said a disembodied voice over the public address system. Clearly, everyone was all of a tizzy in Roof Central. The referee, meanwhile, wandered round with a walkie-talkie, stopping only to check the dryness or otherwise of the grass.

    At 5.11pm, the players returned to thunderous applause. Mauresmo, the first on court, could not take her eyes off the roof above her – and the floodlights that had now warmed up and were shining brightly – as she began her warm-up routine. Safina, meanwhile, kept her eyes firmly fixed on the grass beneath her feet and tried not to let the moment of history distract her.

    And then at 5.19pm, they were ready to play. The brave new dawn of Wimbledon tennis had broken.

    To all intents and purposes, it was exactly the same as playing with the roof off save for the slight echo of the sound of the ball striking the racket and the fact that the players' grunts and sighs sound slightly louder with the roof shut. It's just a good job the rain held off until Maria Sharapova and Michelle Larcher De Brito had gone home.

    The only slight downside to this marvellous moment of history is the fact that the profits will never be the same again. If everyone is watching tennis from morning to night come rain or shine, who will be on hand to prop up the Pimms and champagne bar? No, life will never be the same again.
     
  12. J

    JokaKuu Platinum Member

    #12
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    ..siku Venus atakayoacha kucheza na mimi ndiyo utakuwa mwisho wangu kaungalia tennis.

    .
     
  13. Ng'wanza Madaso

    Ng'wanza Madaso JF-Expert Member

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    Another stroll in the Wimbledon sunshine carried Venus Williams past opposition that varied between the overawed and the inadequate and into the semi-finals of the 2009 Championships.

    The latest victim was Agnieszka Radwanska, the 20-year-old Pole seeded 11th, who managed to retrieve three games from the carnage as Venus won 6-1, 6-2 in 68 minutes.

    It is the eighth time the five-time winner has reached the last four, and on seven occasions she went though to the final.

    Once more, it was all so simple for Venus, who made light of the strapping she wears on her left knee by running down every short ball or dropshot that arrived on her side of the net. Like the previous four Williams opponents in this year's tournament, Radwanska was a set down almost before she had realised the match was under way.

    Perhaps she was baffled at the sudden Venus departure from No.1 Court after the warm-up and before the match began. But Venus came back primed and professional, dropping just two points in four service games.
    Radwanska was 5-0 down in 17 minutes before deciding to combat the bludgeoning power of Williams with some thumping efforts of her own. Rather balatedly the spectators were lifted from their torpor and treated to some strenuous rallies, though Radwanska was still a set behind 10 minutes later as Williams arrowed successive aces past the Pole.

    Radwanska's greater commitment and application managed to make more of a match of it briefly in the second set and she profited from a spell of loose Williams tennis in which the defending champion dropped serve to love on three errors. But Venus has never been slow to heed a wake-up call and from a deficit of 0-2 she swept imperiously through the next six games, capturing the Radswanska serve seemingly at will.

    If her radar had seemed a little wonky at the start of that second set, Venus had assembled her intimidating armoury well before the end and gave it an undemanding workout in the sunshine. The only time she appeared put out was when umpire Kader Nouni overruled what she clearly thought was a winner. Though Venus did not bother with a challenge, her judgment was shown by television to be correct.
     
  14. Ng'wanza Madaso

    Ng'wanza Madaso JF-Expert Member

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    Dinara Safina amemshinda Sabine Lisicki kwa set 2 kwa 1
     
  15. Ng'wanza Madaso

    Ng'wanza Madaso JF-Expert Member

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    Centre Court S.Williams leads V.Azarenka 6-2 Live BBC 1
     
  16. Ng'wanza Madaso

    Ng'wanza Madaso JF-Expert Member

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    sERENA BADO ANAONGOZA KWA SET 1 kwa 0
     
  17. Ng'wanza Madaso

    Ng'wanza Madaso JF-Expert Member

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    Wimbledon Dinara Safina and Elena Dementieva are through to the semifinals. Dinara will face Venus, Elena awaits the winner of the match between Serena Williams and Victoria Azarenka.
     
  18. Ng'wanza Madaso

    Ng'wanza Madaso JF-Expert Member

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    Serena kamshinda Victoria Azarenka kwa set 2 kwa 0 game imekwisha.
     
  19. Ng'wanza Madaso

    Ng'wanza Madaso JF-Expert Member

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    Another year, another semi-final – Elena Dementieva is beginning to make a habit of appearing in the last four at Wimbledon. Given that she used to regard grass courts with suspicion, this is not a bad effort.

    The Russian eased into her appointed place – she is the fourth seed, after all – with a 66-minute rout of Francesca Schiavone 6-2, 6-2.

    It puts Dementieva through to her sixth Grand Slam semi-final and also flags up a rather frustrating statistic for her. This is her 43rd appearance at a major tournament and, despite reaching two finals – the US and French Opens in 2004 – she has never come home with the trophy. Now she is in danger of breaking Jana Novotna's unwanted record – the Czech won Wimbledon at her 45th challenge at a Grand Slam tournament. No one Grand Slam champion has ever had to wait as long for their first title.

    Certainly getting to the last four seemed simple enough. Dementieva has yet to drop a set as she has tripped lightly through the draw. No one has managed to stretch her, much less threaten her so far. Schiavone, then, never really had much of a chance.

    At the age of 29, Schiavone is what you might call a veteran campaigner. She has been living out of a suitcase for the past 12 years, travelling the world in pursuit of titles and ranking points. So far it has brought her nearly $4million in prize money but only the one, solitary title won back in 2007.

    Where Schiavone shines is in a team environment and as the linchpin of the Italian Fed Cup team. Her fighting spirit and simple refusal to give up on any cause, however forlorn, has helped her lead her country to three finals in four years. This year, she is gearing her season to be ready for the final in November – and that makes losing a Grand Slam quarter-final a little easier to bear.

    Schiavone has been coming to Wimbledon for nine years but, until now, had never got beyond the third round – and even then, she only got that far once. This year, though, she finally seems to have got the hang of this grass court mularky and reached the semi-finals in ‘S-Hertogenbosch. It was enough to give her confidence but not enough to trouble Dementieva.

    As the Russian moved swiftly to a 5-0 lead, the wheels fell off Schiavone's game plan. Dementieva simply hit the ball harder, cleaner and more consistently than Schiavone.

    It took the Italian 24 minutes to win her first game – an achievement that brought a ripple of relieved applause from the crowd. But from that starting point, she could never really work up any head of steam. If an opportunity presented itself, she failed to take it and on the rare occasion that she did capitalise, she could not hang on to her advantage.

    Dementieva finally put her foot on the gas as she broke for a 3-1 lead in the second set. Until that point, Schiavone had tried gamely to stay with Dementieva on the Russian's service games in that set, and she had held her own serve with relative ease. But that was as far as she got

    Even Dementieva's nine double faults did not give the Italian enough of a toehold from which to launch a serious assault on her rival. She did hold eight break points on the Russian's serve but, converting only one of them, she could never catch Dementieva on her march through to the semi-final.
     
  20. Ng'wanza Madaso

    Ng'wanza Madaso JF-Expert Member

    #20
    Jul 1, 2009
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    Centre Court - Gentlemen's Singles - Qtr. Finals
    Ivo Karlovic CRO (22) 3 5 6

    Roger Federer SUI (2) 6 7 7
     
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