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Why do men ogle curvy women? “Why boobs and butts will always matter in advertising”,

Discussion in 'Mahusiano, mapenzi, urafiki' started by Sonara, Aug 22, 2010.

  1. Sonara

    Sonara JF-Expert Member

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    [​IMG]


    Look at how a group of men behave every time a woman (or women) passes. Chances are that their eyes will follow the woman until she disappears.

    It is as simple as that - Men will always crane their necks to give a beautiful or curvy woman a second glance. But just why do they do this?

    A study in Britain and published in the Daily Mail in September last year, showed that 47 per cent of men were found to glance at women's breasts on meeting them.

    According to another study, one in every three men will have their eyes on a woman's hips or waist while only one in every five men will remember to look at the face, according to researchers at New Zealand's University of Wellington.

    The same study revealed that men stare at a woman's breasts longer than at any other body part.

    Perry Rose, author of "Women, Sex and Dating for the Single man" says that men's ‘love for breasts' goes back to the days they breastfed as babies. But then she poses, "women also suckled" so why are they not obsessed with breasts?

    Glan Fiero an expert in personal growth wonders whether men's glances at particular parts of a woman's body is instinctive, habitual, wanton lust or just male curiosity.

    "Men like the aesthetic value of human anatomy. Each looks at the body part that satisfies his sexual needs," she writes.

    Still in Britain, a study by Kodak Lens Vision Centre that investigated "men's eyeball activity" towards women showed men check out on average 10 women a day and this takes about 43 minutes of their total day in terms of time.

    "This is about 11 days in a year of "undressing women with their eyes". Just looking and admiring female anatomy," the study noted.

    So, do we have the same problem nearer home and what do the men say about it?

    "Any nice looking breasts that are sparingly exposed will definitely interest my eyes," says Charles Kanake who says he looks at a woman from the front and the first criteria he uses to determine her beauty is whether her breasts are firm and perky or not.

    "But the ones that are over exposed in low cut clothes are simply off-putting and not attractive; in fact most men believe that women who over expose any part has loose morals. This may not necessarily be true but that's what we think," says Kanake, 23.

    Kanake also confesses that he's attracted to light-skinned women and will most likely turn to have a second glance when he passes one with a shapely figure.

    For Tony Chira, it is a woman's hips that will make him momentarily transfer all his thought to that same person.

    "Ogling is not about men being immoral. And whether a man is married or not does very little to dissuade him from glueing his eyes on a curvaceous woman," says Chira, a fashion and modelling consultant in Nairobi.

    He is, however, quick to distinguish between a curvaceous woman and a fat one.

    "It is not about the body size. It is about how the body is uniformly held together," he says.

    Chira's sentiments seem to tally with the definition of curvaceous. The Chambers Dictionary terms curvaceous as "having curves or bent in regular form". When referring to women, curvaceous means, "having shapely curves or a well-rounded body."

    Like Chira, Sylvester Rotich thinks a woman's hips go a long to demonstrate the true face of femininity.
    After all, this is where we see the main difference between men and women," he says.He believes most African men like women with shapely hips due to their mentality of what a woman's beauty is all about.

    "While men say they look at a woman's beauty from the rear, many modern women believe in the Western notion that having a slender frame is what is beautiful. Our young women are fighting weight believing men will find them more beautiful and yet this is not necessarily the case," says Rotich.

    "If you don't believe me, then do the experiment for yourself. Sit somewhere and watch what kind of woman a man will give a second glance. It will definitely not the skinny one," adds Rotich.

    Ask a woman what she feels when her man stares at another woman and she will tell you, this is the first step to infidelity.

    It also makes many women feel as if the man is making a comparison which is not very comfortable for most women.

    But Rotich refutes this. "Many of us just "feed the eyes" and the matter ends there, he says.

    "It is wrong to assume that because we ogle other women, we want to take the ogling to another level such as infidelity. How many men do you find approaching the woman they are staring at?" he poses.

    Randy Dudo, in his early 40s, admits that ogling at women is a weakness that many men have. They do it unconsciously, many times without any malice," he says.

    Dudo, confesses that it is hard these days not to stare at all the attractive women around especially seeing the way their dress codes leave little to the imagination.

    "Many women are going out of their way to enhance their body shapes, especially the hips so they should not complain when we look.

    "Look at all the tight fitting jeans and tight skirts being worn and how they are helping in boosting the shape and size of hips. They know men will be attracted and that is why they are investing a lot on this part of their anatomy," says Dudo.

    African men, he says, prefer women with a bit of flesh and not those mannequin-looking catwalk models but quickly adds "It is not about how big but how regular it goes in tandem with the rest of the body," says Dudo.

    John Ndogo admits he looks at a woman both from the front and the back.

    "The breasts attract first, especially if they are not over-exposed. Contrary to popular belief, most men fear to be seen with a woman who is showing too much flesh as she may be mistaken for an immoral woman," he says.

    Ndogo, 32, , however, thinks there is no crime in a man looking at a woman's body - the only challenge, according to him, would be what you do after that.

    "There is a satisfaction that comes with admiring a woman's body. But one must be careful not to make any moves that may be embarrassing or illegal," says Ndogo.

    Like Rotich, Ndogo believes a woman with curvaceous hips scores higher with men as she is seen as being more feminine.

    "But of course her character also matters because it is not just a good body that makes a woman," he observes.

    Writing on how the shape of women's bodies attracts male attention, author Michele Miller says many companies will use beautiful women in marketing blitzs.
     
  2. BelindaJacob

    BelindaJacob JF-Expert Member

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    Mambo ya "see, appreciate and move on"
     
  3. T

    Taso JF-Expert Member

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    speaking of looks and lips, your avatar would have been 1000 times better if it reflected more of your race
     
  4. Nyani Ngabu

    Nyani Ngabu Platinum Member

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    Do you know "for a fact" what her race is?
     
  5. T

    Taso JF-Expert Member

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    See, I never met a native white Tanzanian.

    That's why I tell her the snow bunny lips don't reflect who she is.

     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 4, 2016
  6. Nyani Ngabu

    Nyani Ngabu Platinum Member

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    Have you ever heard of Richard Mabala? And what if BelindaJacob is mulatto? What if she is of Indian or Arabic extraction?

    Not Easy Being an African Mzungu

    The Citizen (
    Dar es Salaam)

    NEWS
    2 November 2007
    Posted to the web 2 November 2007

    By Stella Barozi

    Richard Satterhwaite Mabala is known around his Sinza neighbourhood as 'Mzungu Mswahili'. He feels Africa is where he belongs. With his wife, Manka at home.

    He is known in his neighbourhood as Mzungu Mswahili, which literally means White African. And in case you are stranded as you are looking for his house, that is the nickname that Richard Mabala advises you to ask for among the taxi drivers at Sinza-Afrika Sana.

    As I went to meet him, a mechanic at a nearby garage told me they call him Mzungu Mswahili because ìhe can even speak Kimangíati,î the language in Manyara region.

    Apart from his African name, Mabala who is originally from England speaks Kiswahili so fluently that you would be forgiven for thinking he is African if you are talking to him on phone. Mabala is used to the surprise on peopleís faces when they finally get to meet him and discover he is a White man. When he encounters this, he teases them further that he is actually a Mnyamwezi-Mkorogo (meaning, a Mnyamwezi but only that he has bleached his skin). Mabala is a Nyamwezi name.

    I was surprised when I met him for the first time. Having read his book ëMabala the Farmerí back in 1988 while in school, I grew up believing the author is African. He is also the author of ëHawa the Bus Driver, which we also used in school during my time.

    In fact, Mabala who was born Richard Satterhwaite in England, 58 years ago, is a Tanzanian. He also fancies everything African - from the vitenge and other ethnic types of clothing that he wears to the Ugali that he has on his dinner menu daily. He says he likes the shirts because they are simple, comfortable and colourful while he finds suits to be horrible.

    At his home, he shows me a photo depicting the last time he wore a suit. It was in 1999 during his wedding to his second wife. He explains that he wore the suit out of respect for his in-laws, otherwise he belongs to the ìrevolutionaryî generation of the 1960s that was typified by, among other traits, their desire to depart from such traditional encumbrances.

    I ask him if he would describe himself as African and Mabala pauses a bit. If I do, some people say you are not,î he replies after a while. ìI feel African though I recognise I wasnít born African. So if the criteria for being African is birth or colour, then I am not African.î

    His Africanness is something that has unsurprisingly proved an issue in more than just a few instances in his life. He says, ìI came when young. My first commitment is Africa. Sometimes I feel I am stigmatised. I feel African. I do recognise that some people donít think I am African.î He adds his whole life has been changed by Africa. He respects those who think he is not African though he gets embarrassed when they actually say so.

    But the scepticism has done nothing to faze Mabala in his love affair with Africa, specifically with Tanzania. ìI enjoyed Tanzania from the first day to date. I have lived in Tanzania for 34 years and I canít believe it because it has gone too fast,î he says.

    Apart from his surname, people also get surprised when they discover that a mzungu could choose to stay in Sinza rather than in a leafy suburb like Oysterbay, Masaki or in the chicer side of Msasani.

    His house is situated along a dusty roadside a stone throw from the Afrika-Sana bus stand, just behind the famous corner bar. The rather crammed neighbourhood undeniably fits the tag ìUswahiliniî and it is populated by petty traders, a small tailoring mart here and there, charcoal vendors, chips sellers and legions of jobless young men hanging around shop verandahs.

    Indeed there is nothing ostentatious about Mabalaís house which is separated from the neighboursí on both sides by perimeter fencing.

    There was no doorbell at the gate as you would have expected and the house help, rather than a uniformed guard, is likely to answer the door when you knock.

    The house is modestly decorated inside with ordinary furniture, African paintings and a striking portrait of Albert Einstein whom Mabala idolises for his ìcrazy ideas. The picture depicts Einstein pulling a face. ìHe was crazy,î says Mabala. ìI like that. Look at him. You have to be an independent thinker. I love him for that.

    Mabala also considers himself crazy. He says one needs to be crazy if they are to bring about change. ìYou have to be a bit crazy in life.î

    Clearly, old habits die hard as they say. For the Mswahili that he is, Mabala still canít help chiding me, albeit jokingly, for being five minutes late for our appointment. However, if you are expecting him to serve you your coffee from a coffee maker, you will be disappointed. He makes his coffee plainly by mixing it with hot water in a cup.

    Richard Satterhwaite came to Tanzania as a volunteer teacher for French in 1973 when he was just 24 years old. He was posted to Mirambo Secondary School in Tabora. It was there that he had the name ìMabalaî bestowed upon him.

    They called me Mabala which means big open space - from England to Tabora,î said Mabala. He took an instant liking to his new name and so did everyone else in Tabora. I enjoyed it because I felt very honoured to be given the name. It is a nice name, descriptive, because I had jumped a big open space to get here.

    When he got his citizenship in 1982, he also undertook the legal procedures that enabled him to be formally known as Richard Satterhwaite Mabala.

    Mabalaís love for volunteering stemmed from his passion for taking part in development issues. This is an enduring passion in him which he has nurtured as a development worker, an activist, a writer, and a columnist.

    At Mirambo, Mabala also taught English Literature, a subject he says he has always found exciting. At the time, contemporary African literature had just been introduced with Tanzaniaís departure from the Cambridge syllabus. He says the subject was particularly exciting because there were very good books available then and also because he felt African literature enabled students and teachers to confront the real issues about liberation, the role of the educated in the society, and development.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 4, 2016
  7. Nyani Ngabu

    Nyani Ngabu Platinum Member

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    Should be "I have never" not "I never"

    Do you know whether BelindaJacob is a native or naturalized Tanzanian regardless of her ancestry?
     
  8. T

    Taso JF-Expert Member

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    well, if she is mulatto and tries to pass as white, that's putrid identity crisis. Use mulatto lips then!

    so, Mabala is a fake name too, and you gonna use him as an example? He is confused, neighbors confused, kids confused. You show me a Tanzanian who is white and I show you one who's changed names, citizenship, location, what have you. There is no native Tanzanian called Satterhwaite anymore than there is native Englishman called Mabala! Identity crisis!

    On the "never met" thing, it's more subtle than you think. "Never" is not always preceded by "have." You can't say "I have never met Pele while I was in Brazil." I never met a black Tanzanian means while I was in a position to do so, I didn't. Bears repeating, what to take home is, "Never" ain't always preceded by "have."

    there is no native Tanzanian who is white!

    if she is white she is an alien

    an alien is not a true-blue Tanzanian, a judge could strip her papers in a nanosecond.
     
  9. Nyani Ngabu

    Nyani Ngabu Platinum Member

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    What are mulatto lips? Can you show me an example or examples?

    Have you scoured every square mile of Tanzania to reach that conclusion? And who is a native Tanzanian?

    Why are you so hung up on "white". Couldn't she be of Indian or Arabic descent and still be a Tanzanian?
     
  10. T

    Taso JF-Expert Member

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    I will show you lips that are not native to Tanzania.
    [​IMG]
    you don't need to scour every inch of Tanzania any more than you need not scour the ocean floor to know that there is no Tilapia in the India Ocean. A little appreciation of Anthropology will suffice. No white people ever evolved in TZ. We are talking Genetics 101.

    Arabic or Indian descent means she ain't a native of TZ. She's trying to pass. ID crisis.
     
  11. Nyani Ngabu

    Nyani Ngabu Platinum Member

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    I asked you to show me mulatto lips not lips that are not native to Tanzania. Now can you show me mulatto lips?

    And what is native Tanzanian?
     
  12. Gaijin

    Gaijin JF-Expert Member

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    Taso mbona unatunyanyapaa watanzania weupe?

    pata picha ....mtoto wa mzungu na mwarabu wa tanzania .............unafikiri atakuwa na rangi gani?

    sisemi kama wako wengi wa aina hiyo tanzania, lakini nna UHAKIKA kuwa wapo.
     
  13. T

    Taso JF-Expert Member

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    mtoto wa mzungu na mwarabu? Kwanza huyo ahakikishe ka process makaratasi haraka wasije wakam Bashe. Mtoto wa mzungu na Mwarabu ni chotara, si mweupe.

    "Mtanzania mweupe"? Kwa hiyo Wewe ni Mzungu Mtanzania? hahahahaahaaaa....

    Ni kituko Mtanzania kusujudia image ya lips za Mzungu, unaonekana kichekesho.

    you broached Mulatto's here, she espouses images of white lips which are not native to TZ, that's my argument, what you talking about Mulattos???

    native? A native of TZ ni mtu mwenye asili ya Tanzania.
     
  14. Gaijin

    Gaijin JF-Expert Member

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    hahaha Taso bwana

    Kama ni mtanzania mzungu tatizo ni kitu gani?

    kwani uraia wa mtu unategemeana na rangi yake?

    btw: kuna watoto wa kizungu na mwarabu ambao wana mpaka macho ya buluu licha ya ngozi nyeupe............

    tuwakatae kuwa si watanzania kwa sababu hawana ngozi nyeusi? na kama yeye ni mweupe kama mzungu akatae rangi yake kwa sababu tu ana uraia wa tanzania?

    isitoshe BJ hakusema kama yeye ni native Tanzanian, hakuna pahala aliposema kuwa yeye ni Mtanzania even!
     
  15. T

    Taso JF-Expert Member

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    Gaijin, we mwenyewe umeona ni kichekesho....

    "tuwakatae...yeye ni mweupe" Gaijin umejitoa kwenye weupe? Hahahaaaaaaa.....

    Hakuna kitu kama "mweupe kama mzungu." Aidha ni mzungu au si mzungu. Chotara si mweupe!

    Kwa Mtanzania kutumia lips za mzungu ni kichekesho. Lips ambazo ni native to TZ zingependeza sana.
     
  16. Gaijin

    Gaijin JF-Expert Member

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    sijajitoa ...........nimo katika watanzania weupe :A S 8:

    sasa hapo suala la native tanzanian au ni mzungu mtanzania au chotara ni jengine.

    BJ labda yeye ni mzungu ambe ni raia wa tanzania ...........sasa hapo utapinga vipi lips zake?
     
  17. Nyani Ngabu

    Nyani Ngabu Platinum Member

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    Kwa hiyo Wangoni wenye asili ya Afrika Kusini sio native Tanzanians?
     
  18. Nyani Ngabu

    Nyani Ngabu Platinum Member

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    Chotara ni mweusi?
     
  19. The Finest

    The Finest JF-Expert Member

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    I thought tunaongelea Why do men ogle curvy women? "Why boobs and butts will always matter in advertising", na sio native ya mtu maana naona watu wamehamia kwenye topic nyingine kabisa
     
  20. The Finest

    The Finest JF-Expert Member

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    :focus:
     
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