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We Won't Leave Power,says General

Discussion in 'International Forum' started by PoorBongo, Jun 27, 2008.

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    PoorBongo Member

    Jun 27, 2008
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    We won’t leave power, says General Otafiire
    David Mafabi


    Local Government Minister Kahinda Otafiire has said the NRM party will not hand over power even if it loses in democratic elections.
    His comments continue the hardening of rhetoric between the ruling party and its opponents even as supporters of President Yoweri Museveni begin a mobilisation campaign to re-elect him in 2011.

    This week it was also reported that Maj. Roland Kakooza Mutale, a security apparatchik and Presidential adviser while calling for support for Mr Museveni warned what he said were coup plotters.

    “Our motto remains no change. We either win or they lose” Gen. Otafiire, a bush war hero said adding that the NRM fought for power and would not relinquish it to the opposition.

    “We are still here, we are going nowhere,” the he said.

    Since the promulgation of the constitution in 1995, the government is supposed to be changed through free, fair elections and suggestions that the will of the people be resisted amounts to opposing constitutional order.

    “True, the greatest honour of civilisation is to resolve disagreements and contradictions through dialogue but where our opposition is not ready for this, it means that they are immature to guide this country peacefully,” said Gen. Otafiire.
    Speaking in Runyankole on February 14, President Museveni similarly said he would not leave power because had won the privilege through a bush war.“It is me who hunted and after killing my animal, they want me to go, where should I go?” he said in reference to the 5-year bush war that resulted in his presidency in 1986.

    Gen’Otafiire’s remarks could cause ripples among the politically active population at a time when the world is struggling to convince Zimbabwe president Robert Mugabe to hold free and fair elections and to relinquish power in case he loses.