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Untapped: The Scramble for Africas Oil

Discussion in 'International Forum' started by Giro, Jun 15, 2009.

  1. Giro

    Giro JF-Expert Member

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    AMY GOODMAN: John Ghazvinian has just returned from Nigeria, where oil has been the driving force behind a longstanding bloodshed.John Ghazvinian joins us now from Philadelphia, where he's a visiting fellow at the University of Pennsylvania. Welcome to Democracy Now!

    AMY GOODMAN: Before we talk about Somalia, Ethiopia and Sudan-and what's not often talked about is oil there-let's talk about the latest news out of Nigeria, out of the Niger Delta. What is happening there, John?

    JOHN GHAZVINIAN: Yeah, as you say quite rightly, it's actually more of the same, to be honest. The situation in Nigeria is now as bad as I think anyone can remember it. Many of your listeners and viewers will be aware of the struggles of the Ogoni in the 1990s against Shell, and so on. That was really child's play compared to what's been going on in the last couple years in Nigeria, and ironically we hear less about it.

    But, you know, I was just there a couple weeks ago. Just in the sort of four or five days I spent in the Delta, there were twenty-nine foreigners taken hostage, kidnapped by militants. You know, it's the same story, basically. It's a battle over access to oil money and for resource control, and it hasn't gone away, and it's not about to go away.

    AMY GOODMAN: The fact that the United States gets more oil from Africa-now, that's a continent versus Saudi Arabia, which is a country. That's not often recognized by our leaders, the continent versus country issue, but that's still extremely significant. Give us the picture of Africa, where the oil is and where many are hoping it will be.

    JOHN GHAZVINIAN: Yeah, actually, you know, the US, as you say, gets as much oil now from-as we do from Saudi Arabia, but actually we're going to be getting about-you know, much more in the next few years. This is what's significant is that by 2015, we're going to be getting 25% of our imported oil from Africa. And, you know, this is why I wrote the book, really, because I feel like this is something we don't pay a lot of attention to. When we think of oil, we tend to think of the Middle East or other parts or Venezuela or other parts of the world. But Africa is becoming increasingly important for our way of life and our energy needs, and I think it's important for people to have some idea what some of the issues are in some of these countries.

    To answer your question, the big kind of African oil boom at the moment, or at least in recent years, has been along the west coast of Africa in the Gulf of Guinea, what some people like to call the armpit of Africa-if you sort of picture a map of Africa, that sort of ninety-degree bend along the ocean there. You know, it's a lot of deep water offshore discoveries that have really been coming on stream recently at places like Angola that are really up and coming. Angola has just joined OPEC a couple months ago. It's the first new member of OPEC in more than thirty years, and it's an African country, and it's rapidly catching up with Nigeria. People are now talking about East Africa, that was possibly the next big margin, you know, the next kind of big oil boom for Africa. That's much closer to China, so it has some obvious benefits there.

    But the bottom line is that Africa, as a whole, is really deeply under-explored and kind of under-it's not really looked at as much as it could be. I mean, there's exploration blocks the size of France that still haven't been given away, and it's a very hot and very exciting destination for the oil industry right now.

    Source:"Untapped: The Scramble for Africa's Oil"

    John Ghazvinian, Journalist who has written for publications including Newsweek and the Nation. His new book is "Untapped: The Scramble for Africa's Oil."
     
  2. Smatta

    Smatta JF-Expert Member

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    They just see us as a kind of opportunity to be exploited, they have no strategies to help us improve our economic status, or develop our countries with the 'under- explored' resources. they will come, arm us, polarize us tribally or religion wise and take as much oil as they can lay their white hands on. Its at this time when I start seeing why Farrakhan harbored hate for this exploiting race.
     
  3. T

    The Truth JF-Expert Member

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    Why can't you help yourselves improve or develop? The hate for Whitey is misplaced. Whitey is not preventing Africans from developing.
     
  4. MwanaFalsafa1

    MwanaFalsafa1 JF-Expert Member

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    Are you are whitey also? Because that red area suggests so.
     
  5. MwanaFalsafa1

    MwanaFalsafa1 JF-Expert Member

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    Smatta my bro I think it is us who have let them do all this? It is our leaders who see the Western worls as the "Great White Hope". After all it is our leaders themselves who keep begging for funds from them. We pay for this one way or another. We must create economy independence before we can gain true independence.
     
  6. T

    The Truth JF-Expert Member

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    No. I am a proud "ponjoro".
     
  7. B

    Bull JF-Expert Member

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    This is very cheap comment, think again
     
  8. Smatta

    Smatta JF-Expert Member

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    Mwana FA,
    In as much as we would love to be independent and leap into industrialization, there is one factor that we can not afford to ignore in the politics, power play and economics of this great continent: The role of the white man.

    Whitey has taken control of Africa ever since the first ship touched our coast, he has manipulated our rulers (they dont deserve the term 'leaders') for decades, and raped our land of all its resources, they have helped some African rulers who tolerate their doings rig the elections, and assisted others in overthrowing Governments, and caused conflicts in many countries- mostly not direct involvment, but through under the table dealings (by arming militias etc) or using croonies to do their dirty work.

    We can blame our rulers for everything wrong that has happened to us but the source of all our problem is the White man.
     
  9. F

    Froida JF-Expert Member

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    The existance of oil in Most of African countries could have paged the way on new dimensions, directions on our economic strategies and development , in the contrary the oil and minerals has proven to be the source of conflicts,fraud,corruption and misappropiation or resources,greedy and lack of committment among African leaders.

    The worsiest part again is within the African leaders and African planners,economist,developers and the soo called political leaders they have continued to favour the international inverstors forgetting the indigenous people.

    I feel pity when i think about this how would the Arabic countries in a pace of only 40 years they changed soo much economically becouse of oil,but not African countries who have all sources and types of minerals including oil ,its a shame ,a great shame indeed we dont need to blame any one we need to be serious at least for this century its too much. we are lagged behind becouse we dont trust on ourselves.
    Furthermore The source of our problems is among ourselves if we can decide to say enough is enough and we can definately achive some tremendous changes in our economies if we are to change our mind set and attitudes
     
  10. T

    The Truth JF-Expert Member

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    No, it's the other way around. You are exploited by Whitey because you are poor but you are not poor because Whitey exploited you. You have been poor before Whitey came to Africa and you will continue to be poor. That's why your hatred for Whitey is misplaced. If anything you should thank Whitey for what he has given Africans and what he has done in Africa so far.
     
  11. MwanaFalsafa1

    MwanaFalsafa1 JF-Expert Member

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    Man are you sure your got love for Africa? Thank the whites for what? For the slave trade? For taking able bodied African men to fight in their wars? Tell me one thing that they have done that that has so beneficial to us?And whats the difference between being exploited because of being poor and being poor because of exploitation? The key word is still EXPLOITATION!!! It is your kind that exploits poor people simply because of their economic situation. I'm convinced you are not African and in fact you are a Whitey yourself or else you would not say, "You have been poor before Whitey came to Africa and you will continue to be poor". If you are an African then it's obvious our problem is African's like you.
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2009
  12. Nyani Ngabu

    Nyani Ngabu Platinum Member

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    One can argue that it was Whitey(s) who educated the so called father of our nation. By educating him and others, don't you think it was a beneficial thing to do?

    The colonialists built the central railway that to this day we still use it. They built a lot of infrastructure that we still use today. They built the state house, ocean road hospital, st.Joseph's cathedral (if I'm not mistaken). They built a lot of schools etc. Aren't all those things beneficial to us?
     
  13. MwanaFalsafa1

    MwanaFalsafa1 JF-Expert Member

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    They build those things after colonizing us siyo? So you mean to tell me if someone takes money from you and they use some of it to buy you food then they are your benefactors? Who gained more from them colonizing Africa, us or them?

    The railroad was built to transfer goods from our land and ship it to their own countries. Hiyo ndiyo unaona wametu saidia or they did it to help themselves? They built the state house for their govenor to colonize as better so hapo napo unaona wametu saidia?


    Everything they "gave us" was from the riches of our own land. They took it, used it as raw materials then "gave back" to us.
     
  14. Nyani Ngabu

    Nyani Ngabu Platinum Member

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    They gave it back to us and we are still benefiting by using them to this day, right?
     
  15. MwanaFalsafa1

    MwanaFalsafa1 JF-Expert Member

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    So you mean to say colonization was one of the best things to happen to Africa and it helped us?
     
  16. Nyani Ngabu

    Nyani Ngabu Platinum Member

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    One can certainly make a strong case for it. Myself, I think colonialism had it's advantages and disadvanges.

    And what do you tihnk? That colonialism was bad all the way around?
     
  17. MwanaFalsafa1

    MwanaFalsafa1 JF-Expert Member

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    The disadvantages by far outweigh the "advantages". I personally don't call them advantages. If the advantages were so good there would have never been a struggle for independence. One question though. Would you prefer colonization return?
     
  18. Nyani Ngabu

    Nyani Ngabu Platinum Member

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    I didn't ask you which outweighs which. Let me ask you again. Do you think colonialism was bad all the way around?



    Wrong reasoning!

    No I wouldn't prefer it's return.
     
  19. MwanaFalsafa1

    MwanaFalsafa1 JF-Expert Member

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    Yes I do. Does that answer your question?
     
  20. Nyani Ngabu

    Nyani Ngabu Platinum Member

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    Yes it answers my question.

    Now, if you think it was bad all the way around, why don't ditch everything that's colonial?
     
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