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Ugandan gay suing a paper killed

Discussion in 'International Forum' started by Rutashubanyuma, Jan 27, 2011.

  1. Rutashubanyuma

    Rutashubanyuma JF-Expert Member

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    Source: CITIZEN TV OF KENYA

    Taarifa zaidi nitazibandika hapa baadaye kidogo kama zitakavyokuwa zinanifikia................
     
  2. TIMING

    TIMING JF-Expert Member

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    Siungi mkono ushoga lakini this is really bad, iwapo watakua wamemuua simply because he is gay; lakini bado naweka tumaini kwamba ameuwawa kama binadamu mwingine kwani we are not safe these days, kuna wauaji na mauaji mengi sana east africa

    Ushoga ulilaaniwa na mauaji pia yalilaaniwa... two wrongs wont make it right!
     
  3. Saint Ivuga

    Saint Ivuga JF-Expert Member

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    [​IMG] David Kato had campaigned against the Anti-Homosexuality Bill
    Continue reading the main story
    A Ugandan gay rights campaigner who last year sued a local newspaper which named him as being homosexual has been beaten to death, activists say.
    Police have confirmed the death of David Kato but say they are investigating the circumstances.
    Uganda's Rolling Stone newspaper published the photographs of several people it said were gay next to a headline reading "Hang them".
    Homosexual acts are illegal in Uganda, with punishments of 14 years in prison.
    An MP recently tried to increase the penalties to include the death sentence in some cases.
    Witnesses have told the BBC that a man entered Mr Kato's home near Kampala, and beat him to death before leaving.
    His Sexual Minorities Uganda (Smug) group said Mr Kato had been receiving death threats since his name, photograph and address were published by Rolling Stone last year.
    Human Rights Watch (HRW) has called for a swift investigation into his death.
    "David Kato's death is a tragic loss to the human rights community," said HRW's Maria Burnett.
    He had campaigned against the Anti-Homosexuality Bill, which appears to have been quietly dropped after provoking a storm of international criticism when it was mooted in 2009.
    Following a complaint by Mr Kato and others, a judge in November ordered Rolling Stone to stop publishing the photographs of people it said were homosexual, saying it contravened their right to privacy.
    Several activists said they had been attacked after their photographs were published.
     
  4. Kigogo

    Kigogo JF-Expert Member

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    uwa tu bana sasa unakaa na toto bwabwa la nini
     
  5. Saint Ivuga

    Saint Ivuga JF-Expert Member

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    Ugandan gay rights activist bludgeoned to death

    From Tom Walsh, For CNN
    January 27, 2011 4:54 a.m. EST

    [​IMG]
    The battered body of David Kato was found in his home near the Ugandan capital of Kampala, his lawyer confirmed.

    STORY HIGHLIGHTS
    • David Kato's name was published on a list of the nation's "top homosexuals" last year
    • The Ugandan tabloid story reignited anti-gay sentiments
    • It was unclear whether his killing was tied to a front-page story

    Kampala, Uganda (CNN) -- A Ugandan gay rights activist whose name was published on a list of the nation's "top homosexuals" was bludgeoned to death in his home near the capital, his lawyer said Thursday.
    A neighbor found David Kato dead and notified authorities, according to his lawyer.
    Kato's money and some clothes were missing after the attack, said John Onyango, his attorney.
    It was unclear whether his killing was linked to a front-page story in a Ugandan tabloid that reignited anti-gay sentiments late last year.
    The story included a list of "top 100 homosexuals" with their photos, addresses and a banner with the words "Hang Them." Kato's name and picture were on the list.
    Ugandan tabloid publishes new 'gay list'
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]Ugandan editor speaks out
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]Interview with persecuted gay Ugandan

    RELATED TOPICS

    Arrest warrants have been issued for two suspects: A taxi driver found near the victim's house and an ex-convict who was staying with the victim prior to the killing, Onyango said.
    Kato told CNN last year that that he feared for his life after the list was released. His lawyer said he had informed authorities in Mukono town, where he lived, of his fears.
    "The villagers want to set my house ablaze," he told CNN at the time. "They want to burn my house ... (they say) can you go away before my house is burned."
    Authorities in the Mukono criminal investigations department declined to comment pending further investigations.
    Rights activists decried the attack, and urged authorities in the east African nation to investigate the killing. They called on the government to protect them from violence, and act on threats and hostility toward them.
    "David Kato's death is a tragic loss to the human rights community. David had faced the increased threats to Ugandan LGBT (lesbians, gays, bisexual and transgender) people bravely and will be sorely missed," said Maria Burnett, senior Africa researcher at Human Rights Watch.
    Earlier this year, Kato and two activists won a case against the magazine that published the list. The court ruled that media in Uganda are barred from releasing details of known or potential homosexuals in the country.
     
  6. Rungu

    Rungu JF-Expert Member

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    Ugandan gay rights activist bludgeoned to death

    From Tom Walsh, For CNN
    January 27, 2011 -- Updated 1240 GMT (2040 HKT)

    [​IMG][​IMG]
    What happened to David Kato?

    STORY HIGHLIGHTS

    • David Kato's name was published on a list of the nation's "top homosexuals" last year
    • The Ugandan tabloid story reignited anti-gay sentiments
    • It was unclear whether his killing was tied to a front-page stor
    Kampala, Uganda (CNN) -- A Ugandan gay rights activist whose name was published on a list of the nation's "top homosexuals" was bludgeoned to death in his home near the capital, his lawyer said Thursday.

    A neighbor found David Kato dead and notified authorities, according to his lawyer.
    Kato's money and some clothes were missing after the attack, said John Onyango, his attorney.

    It was unclear whether Kato's killing was linked to his gay rights activism or a front-page story in a Ugandan tabloid that reignited anti-gay sentiments late last year.

    The story included a list of "top 100 homosexuals" with their photos, addresses and a banner with the words "Hang Them." Kato's name and picture were on the list.

    Arrest warrants have been issued for two suspects: a taxi driver found near the victim's house and an ex-convict who was staying with Kato prior to the killing, Onyango said.

    Kato told CNN last year that that he feared for his life after the list was released. His lawyer said he had informed authorities in Mukono town, where he lived, of his fears.

    "The villagers want to set my house ablaze," he told CNN at the time. "They want to burn my house ... (they say) 'Can you go away before my house is burned?'"

    Authorities in the Mukono criminal investigations department declined to comment pending further investigation.

    Activists decried the attack, and urged authorities in the east African nation to investigate the killing. They called on the government to protect them from violence, and act on threats and hostility toward them.

    "David Kato's death is a tragic loss to the human rights community. David had faced the increased threats to Ugandan LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender) people bravely and will be sorely missed," said Maria Burnett, senior Africa researcher at Human Rights Watch.

    Earlier this year, Kato and two activists won a case against the magazine that published the list. The court ruled that media in Uganda are barred from releasing details of known or potential homosexuals in the country.

    The editor of the Rolling Stone, the tabloid that published the list, denounced the attacks and said he sympathized with the victim's family.

    "When we called for hanging of gay people, we meant ... after they have gone through the legal process," said Giles Muhame. "I did not call for them to be killed in cold blood like he was."

    The Rolling Stone tabloid is not affiliated with the iconic U.S. music magazine by the same name.

    Homosexuality is illegal in most countries in Africa, where sodomy laws were introduced during colonialism.

    In Uganda, homosexual acts are punishable by 14 years to life in prison, according to rights activists.

    CNN's David McKenzie contributed to this report.
     
  7. Rutashubanyuma

    Rutashubanyuma JF-Expert Member

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    Ugandan gay activist David Kato's funeral marred by angry scenes

    Presiding pastor called on homosexuals to repent or be 'punished by God' at the murdered activist's service



    • Xan Rice in Nairobi
    • guardian.co.uk, Friday 28 January 2011 18.16 GMT <li class="history">Article history [​IMG] Ugandan gay activist David Kato's funeral was marred when the presiding pastor condemned homosexuals. Photograph: Marc Hofer/AFP/Getty Images Angry scenes marred the funeral of murdered Ugandan gay activist David Kato today when the presiding pastor called on homosexuals to repent or "be punished by God".
      Towards the end of an emotional ceremony to mourn Kato, who was bludgeoned to death on Wednesday, Anglican pastor Thomas Musoke launched into a homophobic tirade, shocking the dozens of gay men and women as well as foreign diplomats in attendance.
      "The world has gone crazy," Musoke said. "People are turning away from the scriptures. They should turn back, they should abandon what they are doing. You cannot start admiring a fellow man."
      Witnesses said that Kato's former colleagues at Sexual Minorities Uganda, where he worked as an advocacy officer, quickly shouted Musoke down.
      "We have not come to fight," one woman screamed. "You are not the judge of us. As long as he's gone to God his creator, who are we to judge Kato?"
      The microphone was away grabbed from Musoke, and a scuffle ensued. Police were forced to intervene, escorting the pastor away from the funeral.
      The incident highlighted the deep, religiously-stoked homophobia that exists in Uganda, and which Kato's friends believe may have caused his death. He was one of few openly homosexual men in the country, and was a regarded as the "grandfather" of the gay community due to his long struggle for equal rights. His death came just three weeks after he won a court victory against a newspaper that had called for him to be hanged.
      The murder attracted condemnation from around the world, but received more muted coverage in Uganda.
      The funeral was held near Kato's ancestral home of Namataba, outside Kampala, and was attended by about 300 people, including family, friends, and members of the local community. A busload of gay activists arrived from the capital wearing T-shirts featuring Kato's face, or rainbows or the slogan "The struggle continues".
      Three tents had been erected in a clearing, and Kato's body was displayed in open white coffin. A large crucifix lay on top. Kato's colleagues later covered it with a large rainbow flag.
      A human rights activist who attended the ceremony said that Kato's mother and some of his closest friends struggled to contain their emotions as various speakers, including Kato's twin brother, paid tribute to his life and work.
      A statement from US president Barack Obama praising Kato as a "powerful advocate for fairness and freedom" was read out. In her address, Sylvia Tamale, dean of the law school at Makerere University and a prominent critic of the harsh anti-homosexuality bill currently before parliament, called on the government to speak out against injustice in the country.
      Following the pastor's departure, Kato's friends completed the burial, before quickly returning to Kampala due to threats from some local villagers.
      While the investigation into the killing continues, the government continues to insist that it was a normal crime unconnected to his work or sexuality. In a statement, the Ugandan Media Centre said that "investigations point to aggravated robbery as the reason for murder". It said the main suspect, a man who allegedly lived with and worked for Kato, was still at large.
      But Maria Burnett, senior Africa researcher at Human Rights Watch, said the government should not be publicising any conclusions so quickly. "The police need to do their job properly, and it not helpful to say this was simply a robbery before the investigation is completed."
     
  8. Rutashubanyuma

    Rutashubanyuma JF-Expert Member

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    Ugandan gay activist David Kato's funeral marred by angry scenes

    Presiding pastor called on homosexuals to repent or be 'punished by God' at the murdered activist's service



    • Xan Rice in Nairobi
    • guardian.co.uk, Friday 28 January 2011 18.16 GMT <li class="history">Article history [​IMG] Ugandan gay activist David Kato¬ís funeral was marred when the presiding pastor condemned homosexuals. Photograph: Marc Hofer/AFP/Getty Images Angry scenes marred the funeral of murdered Ugandan gay activist David Kato today when the presiding pastor called on homosexuals to repent or "be punished by God".
      Towards the end of an emotional ceremony to mourn Kato, who was bludgeoned to death on Wednesday, Anglican pastor Thomas Musoke launched into a homophobic tirade, shocking the dozens of gay men and women as well as foreign diplomats in attendance.
      "The world has gone crazy," Musoke said. "People are turning away from the scriptures. They should turn back, they should abandon what they are doing. You cannot start admiring a fellow man."
      Witnesses said that Kato's former colleagues at Sexual Minorities Uganda, where he worked as an advocacy officer, quickly shouted Musoke down.
      "We have not come to fight," one woman screamed. "You are not the judge of us. As long as he's gone to God his creator, who are we to judge Kato?"
      The microphone was away grabbed from Musoke, and a scuffle ensued. Police were forced to intervene, escorting the pastor away from the funeral.
      The incident highlighted the deep, religiously-stoked homophobia that exists in Uganda, and which Kato's friends believe may have caused his death. He was one of few openly homosexual men in the country, and was a regarded as the "grandfather" of the gay community due to his long struggle for equal rights. His death came just three weeks after he won a court victory against a newspaper that had called for him to be hanged.
      The murder attracted condemnation from around the world, but received more muted coverage in Uganda.
      The funeral was held near Kato's ancestral home of Namataba, outside Kampala, and was attended by about 300 people, including family, friends, and members of the local community. A busload of gay activists arrived from the capital wearing T-shirts featuring Kato's face, or rainbows or the slogan "The struggle continues".
      Three tents had been erected in a clearing, and Kato's body was displayed in open white coffin. A large crucifix lay on top. Kato's colleagues later covered it with a large rainbow flag.
      A human rights activist who attended the ceremony said that Kato's mother and some of his closest friends struggled to contain their emotions as various speakers, including Kato's twin brother, paid tribute to his life and work.
      A statement from US president Barack Obama praising Kato as a "powerful advocate for fairness and freedom" was read out. In her address, Sylvia Tamale, dean of the law school at Makerere University and a prominent critic of the harsh anti-homosexuality bill currently before parliament, called on the government to speak out against injustice in the country.
      Following the pastor's departure, Kato's friends completed the burial, before quickly returning to Kampala due to threats from some local villagers.
      While the investigation into the killing continues, the government continues to insist that it was a normal crime unconnected to his work or sexuality. In a statement, the Ugandan Media Centre said that "investigations point to aggravated robbery as the reason for murder". It said the main suspect, a man who allegedly lived with and worked for Kato, was still at large.
      But Maria Burnett, senior Africa researcher at Human Rights Watch, said the government should not be publicising any conclusions so quickly. "The police need to do their job properly, and it not helpful to say this was simply a robbery before the investigation is completed."
     
  9. Rutashubanyuma

    Rutashubanyuma JF-Expert Member

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  10. Rutashubanyuma

    Rutashubanyuma JF-Expert Member

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  11. Rutashubanyuma

    Rutashubanyuma JF-Expert Member

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  12. Rutashubanyuma

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  13. Rutashubanyuma

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  14. Rutashubanyuma

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  15. Rutashubanyuma

    Rutashubanyuma JF-Expert Member

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  16. Rutashubanyuma

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  17. Rutashubanyuma

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  18. Rutashubanyuma

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  19. Rutashubanyuma

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  20. Rutashubanyuma

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