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Tony Blair: New Labour died when I handed over to Gordon Brown

Discussion in 'International Forum' started by Rutashubanyuma, Jul 9, 2011.

  1. Rutashubanyuma

    Rutashubanyuma JF-Expert Member

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    Jul 9, 2011
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    [h=1]Tony Blair: New Labour died when I handed over to Gordon Brown[/h] Former prime minister delivers harshest verdict yet on his successor and warns party to avoid 'politics of protest'





    • Polly Curtis
    • guardian.co.uk, Friday 8 July 2011 17.06 BST Article history
      [​IMG] Former prime minister Tony Blair at his home office in Grosvenor Square, London. Photograph: Rex Features

      Tony Blair has delivered his most damning verdict on Gordon Brown's government to date, claiming New Labour died when he left office in 2007 and that the party "lost its driving rhythm".
      The former prime minister said the 13-year Labour government should be remembered in two phases – his and Brown's – and there was "no continuity" between the two.
      In a speech in London to the New Labour thinktank Progress, Blair also advocated a "pick and mix" of policy that did not adhere to old narratives of left and right. He urged the party to let go of some of its old ideologies in order to arrive at the "right" policy decisions.
      He said: "I remain unremittingly an advocate of third-way, centre-ground, progressive politics that came to be called New Labour. From 1997 to 2007 we were New Labour. In June 2007 we stopped.
      "We didn't become old Labour exactly. But we lost the driving rhythm that made us different and successful. It was not a government of continuity from 1997 to 2010 pursing the same politics. It was 10 plus three."
      It is the most comprehensive analysis Blair has made distinguishing between his and Brown's premiership. He also stressed his support for the Labour leader, Ed Miliband, but warned that the party could not indulge in the "politics of protest".
      He said: "Parties of the left have a genetic tendency to cling to an analysis that they lose because the leadership is insufficiently committed to being left, defined in a very traditional sense. There's always a slightly curious problem with this analysis since usually they have lost to a rightwing party. But somehow that inconvenient truth is put to the side.
      "This analysis is grasped with relief. People are then asked to unify around it. Anything else is distraction, even an act of disloyalty. This strategy never works."
      Recalling his government's policies to introduce academies, more patient choice in the NHS, asbos and university top-up fees, plus its pro-business stance – all of which were controversial on the left of the party – he said: "Some of these policies could be supported by people who don't vote Labour. That's not a bad thing.
      "In the real world of the 21st century there will be some pick and mix of policy. Sometimes it will be less left v right than right v wrong. Above all today, efficacy – effective delivery, motivated of course by values – matters as much if not more than ideology. Don't fear it. Embrace it. It liberates us to get the correct policy."
      He argued that Labour should make the economy its priority. "I still think we need to focus a lot on the micro side: targeted policies that support business, jobs, that allow that large amount of cumulative reserves in business to be invested and that also gives us an opportunity to regain, which I think is very important to us, our relationship with business."


     
  2. Rutashubanyuma

    Rutashubanyuma JF-Expert Member

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    Tatizo kwa TOny Blair ni kuwa miaka ya utawala wake second man wake alikuwa ni Gordon Brown.........................sasa atadaije ya kuwa utawala wake ulikuwa ni bora zaidi ya wa Gordon Brown...................................Ukweli ni kuwa Labour party ilipoteza nafasi ya kuongoza UK kwa sababu ya vita vya Iraki na ikaonekana ni kibaraka wa Marekani...........................na hili ndilo lililomfanya TOny Blair kuachia ngazi baada ya kuonekana hachaguliki tena..........................na kwa upande wake Gordon Brown aweza kujitetea kuwa Tony Blair alichelewa kumpisha na kumpa muda wa kutosha wa kujipanga vyema kabla ya uchaguzi....................miaka miwili imethibitika haikutosha na kipindi kile cha uchaguzi kilikuwa ni wakati wa recession na serikali iliyokuwepo madarakani ndiyo hulaumiwa kwa ugumu wa maisha...............................

    How do you rate TOny Blair..............................he picks a "D" in my score card...................
     
  3. Rutashubanyuma

    Rutashubanyuma JF-Expert Member

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    Jul 9, 2011
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    [h=1]Gordon Brown: I'd still be PM if hacking claims had been aired earlier[/h] Former PM believes he could still be in No 10 if new allegations relating to Andy Coulson had emerged before the election



    [​IMG] Gordon Brown believes he could still be prime minister if the latest allegations about phone hacking had emerged 18 months ago. Photograph: Dominc Lipinski/PA

    Gordon Brown has been experiencing mixed emotions this week.
    One side of him has felt what can best be described as a sense of Schadenfreude as he watches the pressure pile up on Rebekah Brooks and James Murdoch.
    Brown has never, and will never, forgive the pair for the brutal manner in which they withdrew the Sun's support for Labour before the last general election. The former prime minister always knew he would struggle to retain the red top's support. But pulling the plug on Labour in the autumn of 2009 on the evening of his last speech to the Labour conference before the general election was seen as a deeply hostile act.
    But Brown is not enjoying any sweet taste of victory because his over-riding emotion is one of regret. He believes that had the latest set of allegations been aired 18 months ago he might well still be prime minister.
    It might seem slightly far-fetched to believe that alleged law breaking at Britain's largest Sunday tabloid newspaper, even if it supports the Tories, could have changed the result of the election. But here is his logic.
    Had two of this week's key developments become public at the turn of 2009/10 then the electorate's doubts about David Cameron might have hardened into outright rejection. Brown believes those doubts explain the Tories' failure to secure an overall majority.
    The two disclosures – the hacking of Milly Dowler's phone and News International's admission that payments were made to police – raise questions for Andy Coulson, Cameron's communications chief from 2007 to January this year. Coulson was NOW's deputy editor at the time that Milly Dowler's phone was hacked and News International let it be known this week that it had passed emails to the police suggesting he was aware of the police payments.
    Brown believes the appearance of these allegations 18 months ago would have led to Coulson's immediate resignation. That would have led to questions about Cameron's judgment in hiring Coulson. These questions are being asked now. But Brown believes that Cameron would have faced far more pressure in the immediate period before a general election. Voters, who were unsure about the Tories, would have turned away from Cameron, according to the Brown thinking.
    The former prime minister developed a close interest in the phone hacking scandal after the Guardian disclosed in July 2009 that News International had paid more than £1m to settle cases that threatened to reveal widespread phone hacking. Patrick Wintour and I recently reported that a few months later, after the News of the World and the Sun abandoned their support for Labour, Brown sought to hold a judicial inquiry into the allegations. This was blocked by Sir Gus O'Donnell, the cabinet secretary, on the grounds that it would be too sensitive before the election.
    At least Brown will be able to claim victory on that front as his protégé Ed Miliband meets Cameron next week to discuss the arrangements for the two inquiries that are likely to be held. Patrick Wintour wrote on Thursday night that the first inquiry into the police investigation will be led by a judge. The second inquiry into media regulation is unlikely to be led by a judge.

    And who was the decisive voice in persuading Cameron that at least one of the inquiries must be led by a judge? That would be Nick Clegg who of course was the man directly responsible for Brown's resignation. During the coalition negotiations Clegg held open the possibility of a coalition with Labour but only if Brown announced that he would step aside.



     
  4. Rutashubanyuma

    Rutashubanyuma JF-Expert Member

    #4
    Jul 9, 2011
    Joined: Sep 24, 2010
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    [h=1]Gordon Brown: I'd still be PM if hacking claims had been aired earlier[/h] Former PM believes he could still be in No 10 if new allegations relating to Andy Coulson had emerged before the election



    [​IMG] Gordon Brown believes he could still be prime minister if the latest allegations about phone hacking had emerged 18 months ago. Photograph: Dominc Lipinski/PA

    Gordon Brown has been experiencing mixed emotions this week.
    One side of him has felt what can best be described as a sense of Schadenfreude as he watches the pressure pile up on Rebekah Brooks and James Murdoch.
    Brown has never, and will never, forgive the pair for the brutal manner in which they withdrew the Sun's support for Labour before the last general election. The former prime minister always knew he would struggle to retain the red top's support. But pulling the plug on Labour in the autumn of 2009 on the evening of his last speech to the Labour conference before the general election was seen as a deeply hostile act.
    But Brown is not enjoying any sweet taste of victory because his over-riding emotion is one of regret. He believes that had the latest set of allegations been aired 18 months ago he might well still be prime minister.
    It might seem slightly far-fetched to believe that alleged law breaking at Britain's largest Sunday tabloid newspaper, even if it supports the Tories, could have changed the result of the election. But here is his logic.
    Had two of this week's key developments become public at the turn of 2009/10 then the electorate's doubts about David Cameron might have hardened into outright rejection. Brown believes those doubts explain the Tories' failure to secure an overall majority.
    The two disclosures – the hacking of Milly Dowler's phone and News International's admission that payments were made to police – raise questions for Andy Coulson, Cameron's communications chief from 2007 to January this year. Coulson was NOW's deputy editor at the time that Milly Dowler's phone was hacked and News International let it be known this week that it had passed emails to the police suggesting he was aware of the police payments.
    Brown believes the appearance of these allegations 18 months ago would have led to Coulson's immediate resignation. That would have led to questions about Cameron's judgment in hiring Coulson. These questions are being asked now. But Brown believes that Cameron would have faced far more pressure in the immediate period before a general election. Voters, who were unsure about the Tories, would have turned away from Cameron, according to the Brown thinking.
    The former prime minister developed a close interest in the phone hacking scandal after the Guardian disclosed in July 2009 that News International had paid more than £1m to settle cases that threatened to reveal widespread phone hacking. Patrick Wintour and I recently reported that a few months later, after the News of the World and the Sun abandoned their support for Labour, Brown sought to hold a judicial inquiry into the allegations. This was blocked by Sir Gus O'Donnell, the cabinet secretary, on the grounds that it would be too sensitive before the election.
    At least Brown will be able to claim victory on that front as his protégé Ed Miliband meets Cameron next week to discuss the arrangements for the two inquiries that are likely to be held. Patrick Wintour wrote on Thursday night that the first inquiry into the police investigation will be led by a judge. The second inquiry into media regulation is unlikely to be led by a judge.

    And who was the decisive voice in persuading Cameron that at least one of the inquiries must be led by a judge? That would be Nick Clegg who of course was the man directly responsible for Brown's resignation. During the coalition negotiations Clegg held open the possibility of a coalition with Labour but only if Brown announced that he would step aside.


     
  5. Rutashubanyuma

    Rutashubanyuma JF-Expert Member

    #5
    Jul 9, 2011
    Joined: Sep 24, 2010
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    ninachoona kwenye Labour Party ni viongozi wanatupiana lawama na hivyo kujaribu kulaumu wengine kuhusu mapungufu yao........................ni vita vya Iraki ambavyo havikuwa na kibali cha UN pamoja na kudorora kwa uchumi ndivyo vilivyowaondoa labour party madarakani..................................haya mengineyo ni uzandiki mtupu...............
     
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