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The one who makes cows cry': Prince Charles gets Maasai title as he visits Tanzanian tribe with Cami

Discussion in 'Habari na Hoja mchanganyiko' started by Spear, Nov 10, 2011.

  1. Spear

    Spear JF-Expert Member

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    Nov 10, 2011
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    [h=1]The one who makes cows cry': Prince Charles gets Maasai title as he visits Tanzanian tribe with Camilla[/h]The Prince of Wales, Duke of Cornwall, Prince and Great Steward of Scotland – Charles already has his fair share of grand titles.
    But today in Tanzania he was given a more humble name by a Maasai tribe, Oloishiru Ingishi – ‘the one who makes cows cry’.
    The prince was awarded the honour during a visit to Mount Kilimanjaro, on the last day of his official tour of Tanzania.

    [​IMG] New titles: Price Charles and the Duchess of Cornwall admire necklaces given to them by the Maasai tribe in Arusha, Tanzania

    On a dusty plain overlooked by mountain, veiled in clouds, Charles and his wife, the Duchess of Cornwall, were given a traditional welcome by the nomadic herders.
    Around 500 men, women and children came from surrounding villages dressed in their colourful tribal robes to greet their royal guests with dancing, gifts and even sacrifice.



    Three bulls were slaughtered before the couple arrived at the Maasai homestead, called a Boma, near Arusha in the north of the country.
    The meat will be used to feed the tribesmen and women, some of whom walked over four miles to the village of Majengo to welcome the couple.


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    'Mother of the children': Camilla shows off her esos necklace - and her poppy - before being awarded her new title


    Camilla - who was also given the title Koto Engera or Mother of the Children - seemed overwhelmed at times by the deafening chanting and jumping by the Maasai warriors, which caused dust to swirl around the royals.
    The dance by the women was less frenzied, but they, too, jumped up and down and ululated – a long, wavering female cry to express joy at good tidings.
    Charles's new name in the tribe's language is Helper of Cows, which literally translates as ‘the one who makes cows cry’.
    According to Matthew Rimba, a village elder and ‘father’ of the Boma, the animals would cry, or call, for their helper because of the support he gives them.
    The awarding of the title is considered a great honour as in Maasai culture, the cow is king.

    [​IMG] Impressive show: Charles and Camilla were treated to a traditional Maasai dance which stirred up the dust that surrounded them

    The Maasai believe they own every cow in the world - and had been particularly impressed to hear that Charles keeps over 800 cows on his land in the UK.
    Asked if that caused a problem for their new relationship, Mr Rimba, who has 45 children and three wives, said: ‘As he's a friend of ours we can't steal his cows back, but we will steal from others.’
    The Prince was presented gifts including a short multi-coloured hunting staff carried by elders called a rungu, while the Duchess was given an ornate beaded necklace called an esos.
    Charles then caused great mirth - rather unintentionally - among the assembled press pack when, in a speech to thank the Maasai for their hospitality, he told the gathered tribesman to have a look at his website for information about the environment.

    [​IMG] Five hundred men, women and children came from surrounding villages dressed in their colourful tribal robes to greet their royal guests

    ‘If you have access to the internet, I have a website...’ he said.
    But it seems as if the tribe is already mixing traditional techniques with modern technology.
    One elder proudly displayed a mobile phone hung around his neck which duly sprung into life with the infamous Nokia ringtone, sparking much hilarity.
    The Prince and Duchess spent the morning talking to the Maasai about the problems they face, particularly over land rights and climate change.
    Charles said: ‘We've been so interested to hear about your concerns. I'm enormously grateful for the club you have given me……it will enable me to wage an even fiercer battle against the issues of climate change.’


     
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