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Thailand hapatoshi kwa fujo..Images and updates!!!

Discussion in 'International Forum' started by Ab-Titchaz, May 15, 2010.

  1. Ab-Titchaz

    Ab-Titchaz Content Manager Staff Member

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    Thailand PM Abhisit in pledge to end Bangkok protest


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    Thailand's PM Abhisit Vejjajiva has said troops will "push forward" with an operation to end an anti-government protest in the heart of Bangkok.

    He said military intervention was the only way to end the protest.

    Clashes between troops and protesters killed six on Saturday, bringing the toll from three days of violence to 22.

    There have been running battles around the barricaded camp where red-shirted protesters, who want the prime minister to resign, have been based since March.

    In his first televised comments since the violence erupted on Thursday, Mr Abhisit said he was trying to restore normality to the city with minimal loss.

    He said a minority of red-shirts opposed to dialogue were putting the stability of the country at risk.

    "We will not retreat," he added.

    Authorities earlier ruled out negotiations with the red-shirt faction, several thousand of whom have based themselves in a camp barricaded by piles of bamboo, concrete blocks, razor-wire and burning tyres.

    BBC News - Thailand PM Abhisit in pledge to end Bangkok protest
     
  2. Ab-Titchaz

    Ab-Titchaz Content Manager Staff Member

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  3. Ab-Titchaz

    Ab-Titchaz Content Manager Staff Member

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  4. Ab-Titchaz

    Ab-Titchaz Content Manager Staff Member

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  5. Ab-Titchaz

    Ab-Titchaz Content Manager Staff Member

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  6. Ab-Titchaz

    Ab-Titchaz Content Manager Staff Member

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  7. Aza

    Aza JF-Expert Member

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    haki ya mwenyezi eeh mola nini iki jamani sie wanadamu??
    ninahuzuni sana huh!!inatisha sasa jeshi ndo linaingilia si wataua wengi?
     
  8. Utingo

    Utingo JF-Expert Member

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    (CNN) -- A rift between Bangkok's economic elite and the growing clout of Thailand's rural poor is feeding a unique divide in a country that is no stranger to political turmoil.
    "We have had conflicts in 1973, 1976 and 1992, but this is unlike anything we've seen before," said Sukhumbhand Paribatra, the governor of Bangkok, as government troops moved on the area near the city's business district where thousands of protesters have been encamped since March. "Those conflicts were more political, but here they go right into the heart of society."
    Past divisions where more a clash of political personalities than a class division, said Paul Quaglia, a former CIA officer and head of PSA Asia, a Bangkok-based security firm. Access to affordable telecommunications across Thailand also is helping transform the nature of this conflict.
    "It's impossible to overstate how important the ability of the rural poor to communicate beyond government censors has been in this protest," Quaglia said. "Everyone has cell phones, everyone has access to the Internet, to Twitter; the community radio stations in rural areas have been very active."
    Moreover, the health of the nation's revered king has raised questions over the future role of the monarchy in Thailand, Quaglia said.
    King Bhumibol Adulyadej, 82, has been hospitalized since September after complaining of fever and fatigue. King Bhumibol, the world's longest reigning monarch, wields little direct political power, but serves as a stabilizing force in Thai society. "We may be coming to a time when there is a sea change in the unofficial control the monarchy has on society," Quaglia said.
    What are the Thai protests all about?
    "This has evolved into something much more than complaints about Thaksin being ousted," said Quaglia, referring to the billionaire former prime minister who was ousted in a bloodless coup in 2006. The protesters at the heart of the current conflict support Thaksin.
    "It's becoming more about why 2 percent of the population gains 80 percent of the GDP," Quaglia said.
    Class barriers and class differences are now at the heart of the conflict, the Bangkok governor told CNN.
    "In Thailand, there is a great deal of social mobility, especially mobility upwards ... this is one of our strengths," Sukhumbhand said. "I think we have to go back to the traditional values of our society and build from the ruins we have witnessed today and are continuing to witness."
    Indeed, the street scenes of dark smoke rising against the backdrop of tanks and gunfire is hard to reconcile with Thailand's reputation as the tolerant "land of smiles." The Southeast Asian nation draws millions of visitors to its pristine southern beaches and to tribal areas in the mountains north near the Laos and Myanmar border.
    Thai Finance Minister Korn Chatikavanij told CNN that outside of the areas directly affected by the protests and military crackdown business continues in most of Thailand. However, he acknowledges the damage that the conflict has done to tourism, which accounts for just over 6 percent of the country's total economic output.
    Many foreign companies have moved executives and their families out of the center of Bangkok and closer to the international airport in case they need to evacuate, said Quaglia, the security specialist.
    There also has been a sell-off in Thai stocks by foreign investors. The Stock Exchange of Thailand closed after its morning session Wednesday due to the escalating conflict on Bangkok streets.
    "Investor sentiment is shot," said Korn, the Thai finance minister. "However, our stock market is robust -- in fact, it went up yesterday (Tuesday)."
    "Thailand is an open economy ... we will recover from this," Korn said. "The economics I'm less concerned about ... What I'm worried about is the political division and social division."
    He said the government has done a poor job communicating all it has done to subsidize rural farmers, bolster education and increase the social safety net for aging citizens.
    "This message has not been received sufficiently at the rural level -- the perception is that we haven't done enough for the rural poor, although the reality is something different," Korn said.
     
  9. ngoshwe

    ngoshwe JF-Expert Member

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    May 20, 2010
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    RED-SHIRT PROTEST
    By THE NATION
    Published on May 20, 2010



    Four killed in another day of violence


    At least four more people, including an Italian photo journalist, were killed in the clash zone in downtown Bangkok yesterday, bringing the death toll to 41.

    The Bangkok Emergency Medical Service's Erawan Centre reported yesterday at 3pm that a total of 41 people were killed and 346 others were injured from the clashes.

    Out of 111 wounded persons currently hospitalised, 15 were in the ICU while 210 were released home, 10 were pending ER test results at Chulalongkorn and Police General hospitals.

    The Italian journalist Polenghi Fabio, 48, was shot in the stomach at the Sarasin Intersection area yesterday morning and was rushed to the Police General Hospital along with six wounded persons being; a foreign woman identified as Michel Mark and five Thai men Wattanachai Eiumnak, Wittaya Ratchapansaeng, Santisuk Thabcharoen, Wichai Phrommak, and Wichai Minpaen.

    Some demonstrators near the Sarasin intersection told reporters that the dead and injured were shot by some sniper hidden near Lumpini Park.

    The hospital later yesterday announced that its blood reserve was insufficient to treat patients but its staff members could not get more blood hence urged media members to contact related officials to bring blood to them.
    After the Thai troops regained control over the area, two |men, suspected to be red-shirt guards, were found dead with gunshots in the head behind the makeshift bunker near Lumpini Park.

    END OF REDS RALLIES
    Bangkok under curfew


    By The Nation
    Published on May 20, 2010



    Centre for the Resolution of Emergency Situation (CRES) on Wednesday imposed a curfew across the capital following riots in downtown Bangkok and several areas after anti-government red shirt key leaders surrendered to police and end their month-long rallies.



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    Thai troops and an armoured vehicle take up their positions on a deserted road close to the Thai protesters stronghold Photo: AP
    Thailand news, red-shirt protests, travel warning Thaksin ,Thai news ,Thailand travel bangkok , to bangkok , local news , The Nation , Thaksin , money expo 2010, Thai Politics , Bangkok Business, Thailand Tourism, AFTA , Breaking News - Nationmultime

     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 4, 2016
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