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Telkom kenya's LION2 finally lands in Kenya

Discussion in 'Kenyan News and Politics' started by Nairoberry, Apr 13, 2012.

  1. Nairoberry

    Nairoberry JF-Expert Member

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    Apr 13, 2012
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    The LION2 cable went live in Kenya

    NAIROBI, Kenya, Apr 13 – Kenya has now gotten a fourth submarine fibre optic connection to the world, when the Lower Indian Ocean Network cable (LION2) operated by Telkom Kenya went live.

    Telkom Kenya Chief Executive Officer Mickhael Ghossein said LION2, whose laying cost over Sh5.7 billion (57 million Euros), is now operational and will significantly boost Kenya’s bandwidth capacity.
    The cable lands in Kenya after The Eastern Africa Submarine Cable System (EASSy), The East African Marine System (TEAMS) and SEACOM. It is a 2,700 kilometers long extension of the initial Lower Indian Ocean Network that connects Madagascar to the rest of the world, providing alternate onward connectivity from Kenya to Asia and Europe.

    “Besides improving our services, LION2 will also play a great role in addressing redundancy, especially during outages like the ones experienced in March that impacted both TEAMs and EASSy, while in turn reassure the firm’s customers of business continuity, network stability and reliability,” said Ghossein.

    LION2 extends from Mayotte, an island off the Indian Ocean Coast to Mombasa. It links East Africa to Madagascar, Mayotte and the Reunion Island, providing an opportunity for increased international traffic through Kenya which further strengthens the country’s positioning as a regional communication hub.

    LION2 uses advanced technology for submarine cables – wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) and it will currently offer a maximum capacity of 1.28 terabytes per second (tbps) in future, this capacity can be increased without additional submarine work.

    The construction of the LION2 cable represents a total investment of around Sh5.7 billion of which Sh3.8 billion comes from France Telecom and its subsidiaries.

    The laying of LION2 cable began in the fourth quarter of 2010. Apart from LION2, Telkom Kenya has also invested heavily in other joint broadband infrastructure projects including TEAMS and EASSy submarine cables and terrestrial backbone and is currently expanding its high quality wireless network for both GSM and CDMA across the country.
     
  2. m

    matsuo Senior Member

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    Apr 14, 2012
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    That's amazing. With that number of fibre optic cables, we expect amazing speeds of connectivity. Hope competition will also help bring down charges
     
  3. livefire

    livefire JF-Expert Member

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    i am expecting a shift in mobile telephony wars from voice transfer to affordable data plan packages. Infact am investing on a suitable 4G set coz data rates are about to fall drastically, just give airtell 3-6 months to knock some sense into safaricom; usual steal market share dominance and loyalty via price wars strategy. Effectively works for airtel.
     
  4. Nairoberry

    Nairoberry JF-Expert Member

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    this is what i love about Kenyans, and i want to be like them,discussing things of substance that have meaning in life,not like some discussing about firigisi na ndizi au kiti moto,or the death of that actor karumba
     
  5. livefire

    livefire JF-Expert Member

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    Its a fact that on matters related to ICT, Kenya wields the power.

    Never new Kenya advised Uganda on its fibre optic cables but ofcourse Uganda never took heed.

    The report comes a year after the Inspector General of Government released a report, saying the Chinese company, HuaweiTechnologies, was laying cables of only 24 cores whereas experts recommend 96 cores as a minimum to ensure that future growth in data and video usage is not interrupted.
    The audit conducted in mid-2011 by Kenyan company, Telecoms Infrastructure Ltd, was to ascertain, among other concerns, whether value for money was achieved.

    Forensics dispute quality of Uganda
     
  6. Gurta

    Gurta JF-Expert Member

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    Help me out here, how can a Ksh. 5.7B project lead to lower prices in connectivity?

    I trying to think about the end user with a modem, who uses say 1GB of data a month.
     
  7. livefire

    livefire JF-Expert Member

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    am no IT expert but i will tell you the basics. Internet bandwidth refers to a carriage or superhighway that internet data uses to move from point A~B. The number of data passing through the carriage determines your internet speed usually denoted by Kb/s or Mb/s. This marine cable comes with a massive extra carriage capabilty of 1.28 terabytes per second. This doesnt help me. This bandwidth is sold to ISP providers eg telephony companies such as safaricom and airtel who in turn make it possible for me as a remote home user to enjoy fast and seamless internet services. By the cables going live in it self will lead to reduced internet costs even before telephony companies align price strategies.
    Competition stage: at this level Mobile telephony can then have their price wars to the benefit of end users leading to an even more affordable data plan to end user. That is just one way of seeing it, the same bandwitdth can also be used to upgrade GSM or CDMA sims to accomodate 4G technology and expand existing 3G coverage to cover all urban centers countrywide. Thats my 2 cents....some tech guy can take it from there
     
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