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Step by Step: Setting Up Microsoft Windows XP

Discussion in 'Tech, Gadgets & Science Forum' started by MziziMkavu, Nov 18, 2010.

  1. MziziMkavu

    MziziMkavu JF-Expert Member

    #1
    Nov 18, 2010
    Joined: Feb 3, 2009
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    Prepare for Setup

    There are four important steps you should take before you start Setup:

    1. Run an upgrade report – it only takes a few minutes to check system compatibility.
    2. Disable virus protection software – if you do not do this, installation might fail.
    3. Back up your files either by using the Backup Wizard that is built into Windows, or by using another backup program.
    4. Decide which type of Setup you want – an upgrade or a new installation.
    Doing these four steps before starting Setup can save you time in the long run.
    Run an upgrade report

    An upgrade report tells you how your hardware and software will work with Windows XP. The upgrade report is a quick and easy program that you can run using the Windows XP CD. Here's how:

    1. Insert the Windows XP CD into your CD-ROM drive.
    2. When the Welcome menu appears, click Check system compatibility.
    3. Then click Check my system automatically.
    You can also find information about your computer's devices (such as printers, scanners, and so on) at the device manufacturer's Web site, in the Windows Catalog, and on the Microsoft Hardware Compatibility List (HCL):
    Text version of the HCL (for all operating systems)
    (https://winqual.microsoft.com/download/default.asp)
    Text version of the HCL (for Windows XP only)
    (https://winqual.microsoft.com/download/display.asp?FileName=hcl/WinXPHCLx86.txt)
    The Windows Catalog
    (http://www.microsoft.com/windows/catalog/)
    You can get to all of the above from Windows Hardware and Driver Central (Windows 7 Compatibility: Software Programs & Hardware Devices: Find Updates, Drivers, & Downloads)

    What do you do if something is incompatible with Windows XP? You can upgrade either the hardware or software in question, find a similar but compatible program or device, or you can remove the program or device and stop using it. To upgrade, contact the manufacturer. To find compatible programs and devices, check the Windows Catalog (http://www.microsoft.com/windows/catalog/). To remove a program, go to Control Panel and open Add or Remove Programs.

    Disable virus protection (antivirus) software


    Virus protection software sometimes interferes with Setup, so make sure that you disable it before you begin installing Windows XP. For instructions about how to do this, refer to the documentation for your virus protection software.
    After setting up Windows XP, remember to enable the virus protection program. In some cases you will need an updated version of the software, which you might be able to download from the software manufacturer's Web site.
    Back up your files

    Back up any files that you want to preserve, just in case something goes awry. Depending on how many files you have, you can copy them to a floppy disk, removable

    drive, or CD, or to a network folder if you have a network. You can copy the files directly or use the Backup Wizard included with most versions of Windows. This wizard is located in the Accessories\System Tools folder on the Start menu.

    Note:
    You cannot restore a backup in Windows XP that you created by using the Msbackup tool in Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows Millennium Edition. For more information about this issue, see Microsoft Knowledge Base article 305381, "Cannot Restore Backups That You Create in Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows Me with the Windows XP NTBackup Tool."

    Decide which type of Setup you want


    There are basically three different types of Setup: an upgrade, a new installation (also known as a clean installation or a full installation), and a multiboot installation. Hint: we highly recommend the first one!

    Upgrade
    . This is the easiest method of installing Windows XP. We recommend you use this method if you are running a previous version of Windows. When you upgrade, you replace the existing operating system with Windows XP, but your data and most user settings should not be affected. (It's always a good idea to back up your files before starting, just in case.)

    You can upgrade from Windows 98, Windows 98 Second Edition, Windows Millennium Edition, Windows NT Workstation 4 (Service Pack 6), or Windows 2000 Professional.

    Note:
    Windows 2000 can only be upgraded to Windows XP Professional. See Microsoft Knowledge Base article 292607 for supported upgrade paths. Also see Microsoft Knowledge Base article 316941 for an overview of the Windows XP Setup process.

    Tip:
    To find a Microsoft Knowledge Base article, go to Microsoft Help and Support (Microsoft Support), type the article number in the Search the Knowledge Base box, and press ENTER.

    New installation
    . Also known as a full installation or a clean installation, this method requires a little more work than an upgrade. A new installation can install Windows XP on another drive or partition without disturbing an existing installation, or you can choose to wipe out everything on your hard drive so that you "start from scratch." You should

    definitely back up your files before doing a new installation!
    As part of a new installation, you can also partition and format your hard drive. It's best to do this as part of Setup, rather than doing it in advance (as you might have done with previous versions of Windows). We'll get to that.

    Multiboot installation
    . The hardest of all three, this method is a variation of the new installation process that lets you run more than one operating system on your computer. For example, you can have both Windows XP and Windows 98 installed. To switch from one to the other, you restart the computer and choose an operating system from a menu that appears when the computer starts. Sounds cool, but don't attempt this unless you are an advanced computer user.
     
  2. MziziMkavu

    MziziMkavu JF-Expert Member

    #2
    Nov 18, 2010
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    Upgrade to Windows XP

    Note: Before installing Windows XP, you should disable your virus protection (antivirus) software, and you might want to run the Windows Memory Diagnostic tool to test your computer's random access memory (RAM). To use the Windows Memory Diagnostic tool, follow the instructions on the Windows Memory Diagnostic (Microsoft Online Crash Analysis) Web site. Be sure to enable your virus protection software after installing Windows XP.
    When you upgrade to Windows XP, you install Windows to the same folder where your current version of Windows is located, updating the earlier version. Here's how:

    1. Start your computer. Also, make sure you have your product key handy.
    2. Insert the Windows XP CD into your computer's CD-ROM or DVD-ROM drive.
    3. On the menu that appears, click Install Windows XP.
    4. On the Welcome to Windows Setup page, click Upgrade (recommended) (if it is not already selected), and then click Next. (You should click Next on each screen from here on.)
    5. On the License Agreement page, read the agreement, and follow the instructions to accept or reject the agreement.
    6. On the Your Product Key page, type the 25-character product key in the appropriate boxes.
    7. On the Get Updated Setup Files page, select the option that you want. Hint: It's a really good idea to select Yes and get the updated files, but you can only do this if you're able to connect to the Internet. Note: Some of the problems addressed in the troubleshooting section of this document are prevented by getting the updated Setup files.
    8. During this phase of Setup, the computer will restart several times, and you'll see screens telling you about new features in Windows XP. This part of Setup takes a while. It's a good time to go have a cup of coffee or take a break.
    9. Finally, the computer restarts one last time and Windows XP starts.
    Do not forget to enable your virus protection software after Setup is finished.
    Perform a new installation of Windows XP

    If your computer does not have an operating system currently installed or you have decided to install Windows from scratch, you can perform what is known as a new installation (also known as a clean installation, or a full installation). This process is more complicated and takes longer than an upgrade (about 20 steps as opposed to 9 for an upgrade). To perform an upgrade, refer to the section titled "Upgrade to Windows XP."
    Note: Before installing Windows XP, you should disable you virus protection (antivirus) software, and you might want to run the Windows Memory Diagnostic tool to test your computer's random access memory (RAM). To use the Windows Memory Diagnostic tool, follow the instructions on the Windows Memory Diagnostic (Microsoft Online Crash Analysis) Web site. Be sure to enable your virus protection software after installing Windows XP.
    CAUTION: You can choose to delete everything that currently exists on the hard drive during a new installation, so be sure to back up any data you want to keep before you begin (make sure that the backup data is not stored on the drive you are going to delete).
    Here's how to perform a new installation of Windows XP:

    1. Insert the Windows XP CD into the CD-ROM drive. Note: Make sure the computer can boot from a CD. If it can't, then follow the procedures in the section titled "Configure a computer to boot from CD" or see the "How do I install Windows from the command prompt?" section under "Perform other Setup-related tasks."
    2. Restart the computer.
    3. When the message to Press any key to boot from CD… is displayed, quickly press any key (for example, the SPACEBAR). Setup begins. Note: Pay close attention here, because it's very easy to miss this message. If your current operating system starts, you'll know that you missed the opportunity to boot from CD. Restart your computer and try again.
    4. After Setup starts, several messages will flash across the bottom of the screen. These messages are only important under special circumstances, such as installing a particular hardware access layer (HAL), or loading a small computer system interface (SCSI) driver. Most people can ignore them. For more information about this subject, see Microsoft Knowledge Base articles 295116 and 220845.
    5. Next, a screen appears that offers the following three options: Set up Windows XP, Repair a Windows XP installation, or Quit Setup. Press ENTER to select the first option.
    6. The End User License Agreement appears next. Read the license agreement and follow the instructions to accept or reject the agreement. If your Windows CD is an upgrade CD, after accepting the agreement, you will be prompted to insert the CD of your previous operating system to verify that the previous version qualifies for upgrade to Windows XP. Important! If you use a recovery CD from an original equipment manufacturer (also called an OEM), it is possible that the CD will not be accepted. If you delete the partition information or format the drive and the OEM recovery CD is not accepted as valid media, you must use the OEM recovery CD to restore your previous version of Windows. For details about restoring your system using the OEM recovery media, please contact your computer manufacturer.
    7. If a screen appears showing an existing installation of Windows XP, press ESC to continue installing a fresh copy of Windows XP.
    8. At the next screen, you have the option of repartitioning your drive. It's a good idea to repartition if you want to merge several smaller partitions into one large one, or if you want to create several smaller partitions so that you can set up a multiboot configuration. If you want to repartition, follow the instructions to delete existing partitions, if needed, and then select unpartitioned space and press ENTER to proceed. CAUTION: Deleting a partition will remove all data stored on that partition. Before you continue, make sure you have backed up everything you want to keep.
    9. Select the formatting method you would like to use, and then press ENTER. NTFS offers both enhanced formatting capabilities and security technologies. If you need to access drives or DOS files (such as from a DOS-based boot disk) using Windows Millennium Edition or earlier versions of Windows, you might need to select FAT32 instead. Select either format method (quick or slow).
    10. Setup will format the drive, copy initial Setup files, and restart the computer. Note: After the computer restarts, you will again receive the message Press any key to boot from CD but you should ignore it so that you do not interrupt the current installation process.
    11. After another restart, the next part of Setup will begin.
    12. On the Regional and Language Options page, follow the instructions to add language support or change language settings, if desired.
    13. On the Personalize Your Software page, type your name and the name of your company or organization (if applicable).
    14. On the Your Product Key page, type the 25-character product key that came with your copy of Windows XP.
    15. On the Computer Name and Administrator Password page, make up a computer name (if your network administrator gave you a name to use, type that). Then make up a password for the Administrator account on your computer. Type it once, and then confirm it by typing it again. Important: Be sure to remember the Administrator password. You'll need this password when you want to make changes to your system in the future.
    16. On the Date and Time Settings page, make any changes that are necessary.
    17. On the Networking Settings page, if it appears, select Typical settings (unless you plan to manually configure your networking components).
    18. On the Workgroup or Computer Domain page, click Next. If you want to add your computer to a domain, select the second option and fill in the domain name. (If you do this, you will be prompted for a user name and password.) Note: Connecting to a domain is only possible in Windows XP Professional, not in Windows XP Home Edition.
    19. Next, while Setup copies files to your computer and completes a few other tasks, you'll see a series of screens that tell you about new features in Windows XP.
    20. Finally, your computer will restart. Again, ignore the message to press any key. After Setup completes, eject the CD from the CD-ROM drive.
    Do not forget to enable your virus protection software after Setup is finished.
     
  3. MziziMkavu

    MziziMkavu JF-Expert Member

    #3
    Nov 18, 2010
    Joined: Feb 3, 2009
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    Transfer files and settings from another computer

    Did you ever wish that you could easily transfer your files and settings from an old computer to a new one? The Files and Settings Transfer Wizard available in Windows XP can assist you in doing this. This wizard helps take the pain out of upgrading to a new computer.
    Here's how to use this wizard:
    On your new computer:

    1. Click Start, and then click Files and Settings Transfer Wizard.
    2. On the Welcome page of the wizard, click Next.
    3. On the Which computer is this? page, select New computer.
    4. On the Do you have a Windows XP CD? page, select I will use the wizard from the Windows XP CD, unless you don't have a Windows XP CD. If that is the case, you will need to make a Wizard Disk so that you can run the wizard on your old computer. Select the first option and follow the instructions to make the Wizard Disk.
    5. Now go to your old computer (or the computer that you're transferring files and settings from).
    On your old computer:

    1. If you don't have a Windows XP CD, insert the Wizard Disk that you created into the floppy drive. Click Start, click Run, and then click Browse. Browse to your floppy drive and then double-click the MigWiz.exe file. In the Run dialog box, click OK. If you do have a Windows XP CD, insert it into the CD-ROM drive of the computer you want to copy files and settings from and wait for the startup menu to appear. If the menu does not appear automatically, click Start, click Run, and then click Browse. Browse to your CD-ROM drive and then double-click the Setup.exe file. In the Run dialog box, click OK. Click Perform additional tasks, and then click Transfer files and settings.
    2. On the Welcome page of the Files and Settings Transfer Wizard, click Next.
    3. On the Which computer is this? page, select Old computer.
    4. On the Select a transfer method page, choose a method that will work for both computers. For example, you can place the files and settings on a network drive that both computers have access to, or you can use a removable drive. Whatever method you choose, both computers must be able to use it.
    5. On the What do you want to transfer? page, select one of the three options. Depending on the type of transfer method you choose, some options are better than others here. For instance, if you plan to transfer more than just a few files and settings, choose a method other than floppy disks (since those have the lowest storage capacity). If you decide to change your transfer method, you can always click Back. On this page, you can also select a check box that lets you choose a custom list of files and settings to be transferred. This option is for advanced users.
    6. At this point, you might see a message telling you to install certain programs on your new computer before continuing. This step is not required, but those programs might not work correctly without doing this.
    7. The wizard now collects the files and settings you requested and prepares to transfer them to the new computer. Insert a disk or removable drive when prompted, if you are using one of those methods.
    8. On the Completing the Collection Phase page, click Finish. Then go to your new computer, taking along any disk or CD you have used.
    On your new computer:

    1. Click Start, and then click Files and Settings Transfer Wizard.
    2. On the Welcome page, click Next.
    3. On the Which computer is this? page, select New computer.
    4. If you placed your files and settings on a disk or CD, insert it now. On the Where are the files and settings? page, tell the wizard where to find the files and settings. The wizard transfers the files and settings to the new computer.
    5. On the Completing the Files and Settings Transfer Wizard page, read any messages about the status of your transfer, and then click Finish.
    6. You might see a message telling you that you need to log off before the new settings will appear on your new computer. You can just log off and log back on. There is no need to restart the computer.
    That's it! The transferred files and settings should now be on your new computer.
    Partition and format a hard drive

    If there are no partitions on your hard drive, you will need to create a partition and format it. Alternatively, it's a good idea to repartition your hard drive if you want to merge several smaller partitions into one large one, or if you want to create several smaller partitions so that you can set up a multiboot configuration.
    If you want to partition or format your hard drive, we recommend that you use the disk partitioning and formatting tools that are built into Windows XP Setup. These tools allow you to delete existing partitions and to create one or more new partitions.
    IMPORTANT: If you follow these steps on a hard disk that is not empty, all of the data stored on that hard disk will be permanently deleted.
    To use the disk partitioning and formatting tools in Windows XP Setup:

    1. Insert the Windows XP CD into your CD/DVD drive (or insert the first Windows XP Setup boot disk into the floppy disk drive), and then restart the computer.Note: To start your computer from the Windows XP CD (or from the Setup boot disk), your computer must be configured to start from the CD/DVD drive (or the floppy disk drive). In some cases, you might have to modify your computer's BIOS settings to do this. For more information, see "Configure a computer to boot from CD."
    2. If you are starting the computer from the Windows XP CD, press a key to boot from CD when you are prompted to do so. If you are starting from the Windows XP Setup boot disks, insert each of the additional disks when prompted, and then press ENTER to continue after inserting each disk.
    3. At the Welcome to Setup page, press ENTER to continue.
    4. On the License Agreement page, read the agreement, and then follow the instructions for accepting or rejecting the agreement.
    5. If an existing Windows XP installation is detected, you will be prompted to repair it. Press ESC (do not repair).
    6. All existing partitions and unpartitioned spaces are listed for each physical hard disk. Use the arrow keys to select the partition or unpartitioned space where you want to create a new partition, and then press D to delete an existing partition or press C to create a new partition using unpartitioned space. If you press D to delete an existing partition, you must then press L (or press ENTER, and then press L if it is the System partition) to confirm that you want to delete the partition. Repeat this process for each of the existing partitions that you want to use for the new partition. When all the partitions are deleted, select the resulting unpartitioned space and press C to create a new partition.
      Note: If you want to create a partition where one or more partitions already exist, you must first delete the existing partition or partitions and then create the new partition.
    7. Type the size (in megabytes, or MB) that you want to use for the new partition, and then press ENTER, or just press ENTER to create the partition using the maximum size.
    8. If you want to create additional partitions, repeat steps 6 and 7.
    9. If you want to install Windows XP, use the arrow keys to select the partition you want to install it on, and then press ENTER. If you do not want to format the partition and install Windows XP, press F3 two times to quit Setup, and then do not continue with the following steps. In this case, you must use another program to format the partition.
    10. Select the format option that you want to use for the partition, and then press ENTER. The options are:
      • Format the partition by using the NTFS file system (Quick)
      • Format the partition by using the FAT file system (Quick)
      • Format the partition by using the NTFS file system
      • Format the partition by using the FAT file system
      • Leave the current file system intact (no changes)
      For most configurations, NTFS is a good choice for security and flexibility. If you plan to install a multiboot configuration and access data on the drive using older operating systems such as Windows 95, Windows 98, or Windows Millennium Edition, however, select FAT.
      When you format a volume, files are removed from the volume and the hard disk is scanned for bad sectors. The majority of the time required to format a volume is devoted to scanning the disk. If you choose the Quick format option, files are removed from the partition, but the disk is not scanned for bad sectors. You should only use this option if your hard disk has been previously formatted and you are sure that your hard disk is not damaged.
      Note: During Windows XP Setup, the option to leave the current file system intact is not available if the selected partition is a new partition. For partitions up to 2 gigabytes (GB) in size, Setup uses the FAT (also known as FAT16) file system. For partitions greater than 2 GB but less than 32 GB, Setup uses the FAT32 file system. For partitions greater than 32 GB, Setup uses NTFS.
      Note: If you deleted and created a new System partition but you are installing Windows XP on another partition, you will be prompted to select a file system for both the System and Boot partitions at this point.
    11. After Setup formats the partition, follow the on-screen instructions to continue Setup. After Setup is complete, you can use the Disk Management tools in Windows XP to create or format additional partitions.
     
  4. MziziMkavu

    MziziMkavu JF-Expert Member

    #4
    Nov 18, 2010
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    Perform other Setup-related tasks

    How do I install Windows from the command prompt?

    If your computer will not boot from a CD, you can still use the Windows XP Setup floppy disks to start Setup. During Setup, you will be prompted to insert the Windows XP CD. For more information, see "Create boot disks."
    Otherwise, you can use a Windows 98 or Windows Millennium Edition Startup disk to start the computer, and then run Winnt.exe from the i386 folder of your Windows XP CD.

    1. The Smartdrv.exe tool will speed up the process of copying files from the CD to your hard drive. To use the Smartdrv.exe tool, make sure the Smartdrv.exe file is present on the startup disk. If you do not have Smartdrv.exe, file copying will take much longer but it can still be done successfully. Verify that the following entries exist in the following files on your startup disk; add the entries if they do not already exist:
      In Autoexec.bat, add this line:
      smartdrv.exe
      In Config.sys, add this line:
      device=himem.sys
      Note: For information about modifying the Config.sys and Autoexec.bat files, see Microsoft Knowledge Base article 232558.
    2. Insert the startup disk into your computer's floppy drive, and restart the computer.
    3. When the DOS prompt appears (it looks like this: C:>), type the following lines, pressing ENTER after each one. Substitute the drive letter of your CD-ROM drive for the letter D, if yours is different. D:
      cd \i386
      winnt
      When Setup begins, follow the prompts on your screen.
    How do I set the default operating system (when multiple systems are installed)?

    If you have more than one operating system installed, you can select the operating system that you want to use as the default:

    1. In Windows XP, right-click My Computer, and then click Properties.
    2. On the Advanced tab, under Startup and Recovery, click Settings.
    3. Under System startup, in the Default operating system list, click the operating system that you want to start when you turn on or restart your computer.
    4. Select the Time to display list of operating systems check box, and then select the number of seconds for which you want the list displayed before the default operating system starts.
    Warning: The boot options file (Boot.ini) controls the number and order of operating systems on your computer. To manually edit this file, click Edit on the Startup and Recovery tab. Use caution when modifying the boot options file. Doing so incorrectly might make your computer unusable. For more information, see Microsoft Knowledge Base article 289022.
    How do I uninstall Windows XP?

    If you need to uninstall Windows XP and return to the operating system from which you originally upgraded, follow these instructions.
    Note: If you performed a new installation instead of upgrading, you cannot uninstall Windows XP. In this case, you need to perform a new installation of your previous operating system.
    Important Notes:


    • If enough space is available, the Windows XP uninstallation files are automatically saved during the upgrade process. If space is not available, the files are not saved. If the files were not saved, you cannot use the uninstallation process that is described in this section.
    • Any programs that were installed prior to the Windows XP upgrade will be preserved. However, any programs that were installed after the Windows XP upgrade will not be available after you uninstall Windows XP. You might need to reinstall these programs.
    • To be able to successfully uninstall Windows XP SP2, you must have upgraded from Windows 98, Windows 98 Second Edition, or Windows Millennium Edition. If you upgraded from Windows XP, Windows 2000, Windows NT 4.0, or Windows 95, you cannot uninstall Windows XP SP2.
    • If you converted your hard disk to the NTFS file system, you cannot revert back to an operating system that is incompatible with NTFS (for example, you cannot revert back to Windows 98 or Windows Millennium Edition).
    To uninstall Windows XP:


    1. Restart your computer in Safe Mode. To do so, restart your computer and press F8 while Windows is starting.
    2. Log on using the Administrator account.
    3. Click Start, click Control Panel, and then double-click Add or Remove Programs.
    4. In the list of installed programs, double-click Uninstall Windows XP. Important: If Uninstall Windows XP is not in the list of installed programs, you must manually reinstall the original operating system. If this is the case, be sure to back up all of your critical data before you proceed.
      If you have upgraded to Windows XP from Windows 98 or Windows Millennium Edition, it might be possible to manually uninstall Windows XP if the Undo folder is still available. For more information, see Microsoft Knowledge Base article 312569.
    5. When you receive the "Are you sure you want to uninstall Windows XP and restore your previous operating system?" message, click Yes to start the Windows XP uninstallation process.
    6. After the Windows XP uninstallation process is finished, your computer will shut down and then restart using the previously installed operating system.
    How do I remove Windows XP from one computer and install it on another?

    Follow the instructions above for uninstalling Windows XP. Then, use the Windows XP CD to install Windows XP on the new computer.
    For more information, see Microsoft Knowledge Base article 303661 and read the topic about activation failures when moving Windows XP to another computer.
    How do I deal with activation problems?

    If you are prompted to activate your installation of Windows XP, defer activation until you have completed planned upgrades or changes to your computer's fixed hardware and related device drivers. Otherwise, you may need to reactivate after making such changes. Fixed hardware/drivers include the first instance of devices such as video, network (excluding modems), SCSI, hard drives, CD-ROM/DVD, and system memory. USB or other removable devices (such as cameras and printers) do not affect activation.
    If you uninstall Windows XP from one computer (Computer A) and then install it on a second computer (Computer B), the following can occur:

    • If fewer than 120 days have passed since the first installation of Windows XP on Computer A, you cannot activate Windows on Computer B over the Internet. Instead, when you are prompted to activate, you must call the phone number listed in the Activation Wizard, explain that you uninstalled and then reinstalled to a different computer, and be given a valid product key.
    • If it has been more than 120 days since the first installation of Windows XP on Computer A, activation on Computer B should work normally.
    For more information about troubleshooting activation problems, see Microsoft Knowledge Base articles 293764, 293764, 312295, 314935, and 318702.
    Troubleshoot Setup

    Did you run into problems during Setup? Unfortunately, it does sometimes happen. Some problems can be solved by using the information in this section.
    Important: If you have virus protection software installed on your computer, disable it. Virus protection software can cause problems during setup. Be sure to enable your virus protection software after installing Windows XP.
    You can use the following troubleshooting steps if you have problems when you are upgrading to Windows XP from Windows 98, Windows 98 Second Edition, or Windows Millennium Edition.
    General troubleshooting

    If you encounter problems while running Setup, exit Setup and run the Upgrade Advisor from the Windows XP CD. Here's how:

    1. Insert the Windows XP CD into your CD-ROM drive.
    2. When the Welcome menu appears, click Check system compatibility.
    3. Then click Check my system automatically.
    Upgrade Advisor will check for hardware and software incompatibilities. These are often the cause of Setup problems. Remove or uninstall the incompatible hardware or software, and then run Setup again.
    If Upgrade Advisor does not find the problem, you can also clean boot your computer and run Setup again. Clean-boot troubleshooting is simply a way of removing variables that could cause problems.
    To perform clean boot troubleshooting in Windows Millennium Edition:


    1. Click Start, click Run, in the Open box, type msconfig and then click OK.
    2. On the General tab, click Selective startup.
    3. Clear all the check boxes under Selective startup.
    4. On the Startup tab, select the *StateMgr check box (Windows Millennium Edition only), and then click OK.
    5. When you are prompted to restart your computer, click Yes.
    6. After the computer restarts, click Start, click Run, in the Open box, type msconfig, and then click OK. Important: Look closely at the General tab to make sure that the check boxes under Selective startup are clear. Proceed to the next step if none of the check boxes are selected. If you see a disabled or gray check box, your computer is not truly clean-booted and you might need assistance from the manufacturer of the program that is affecting Msconfig.
    7. After you verify that your computer is clean-booted, try running Windows XP Setup again.
    For more information, see Microsoft Knowledge Base article 267288.
    To return from a clean boot state


    1. Click Start, click Run, in the Open box, type msconfig, and then click OK.
    2. On the General tab, click Normal startup, and then click OK.
    3. Click Yes when you are prompted to restart your computer.
    To perform clean boot troubleshooting in Windows 98:

    For information about performing a clean boot for troubleshooting purposes in Windows 98, see Microsoft Knowledge Base article 192926.
    File copy error during Setup

    Suppose Setup stops when copying files, and you see a message like this:
    Setup cannot copy the file <file_name>. Press X to retry, Y to abort.
    Here are some possible causes and solutions for this problem:

    • Your Windows XP CD is scratched, smudged, or dirty. Clean the CD with a soft cloth, insert it into the CD drive, and then click OK.
    • Your CD drive is not working properly or the CD might be vibrating too much for the laser to accurately read the data. For more information about this problem, consult your hardware documentation, or contact the CD drive manufacturer.
    • If you are using multiple CD drives, your computer might be trying to locate files on the wrong drive. If your hardware has a feature to disable CD drives that are not being used, disable the CD drives that you are not using. Note: To disable a device in Windows 95, right-click My Computer, click Properties, open Device Manager, and then clear Original Configuration (Current). In Windows 98 and Windows Millennium Edition, select the Disable in this hardware profile check box in Device Manager.
      If required, re-enable the device after upgrading to Windows XP. For more information, see Microsoft Knowledge Base article 283658.
    • There is a virus on your computer. Run a virus-scanning program to check your system and identify needed repairs.
    Note: If you experience problems during installation, you can use the Windows Memory Diagnostic tool to test your computer's random access memory (RAM). This tool helps determine whether installation problems are caused by failing hardware, such as RAM or the memory system of the motherboard. To use the tool, follow the instructions on the Windows Memory Diagnostic (Microsoft Online Crash Analysis) Web site.
    For information about several more technical issues that might be causing the problem, see Microsoft Knowledge Base article 310064: How to Troubleshoot Windows XP Problems During Installation.
    If you can rule out all of the causes listed above, and you continue to receive the error message, copy the i386 folder from the CD drive to your local hard disk, and then try to run Setup from your hard disk. Here's how:

    1. The Smartdrv.exe tool will speed up the process of copying files from the CD to your hard drive. To use the Smartdrv.exe tool, make sure the Smartdrv.exe file is present on the startup disk. If you don't have Smartdrv.exe, file copying will take much longer but it can still be done successfully. Verify that the following entries exist in the following files on your startup disk; add the entries if they do not already exist:
      In Autoexec.bat, add this line:
      smartdrv.exe
      In Config.sys, add this line:
      device=himem.sys
      Note: For information about modifying the Config.sys and Autoexec.bat files, see Microsoft Knowledge Base article 232558.
    2. Insert the startup disk into your computer's floppy drive, and restart the computer.
    3. When the DOS prompt appears (it looks like this: C:>), type the following lines, pressing ENTER after each one. Substitute the drive letter of your CD-ROM drive for the letter D, if yours is different.D:
      cd \i386
      winnt
      When Setup begins, follow the prompts on your screen.
    Note: There is no option to boot to a command prompt on the initial startup menu in Windows Millennium Edition. However, you can boot to a startup floppy disk and then type C: and press ENTER to access the hard drive, as long as the startup disk uses the same file system as the hard disk.
     
  5. MziziMkavu

    MziziMkavu JF-Expert Member

    #5
    Nov 18, 2010
    Joined: Feb 3, 2009
    Messages: 38,511
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    Your computer hangs or stops responding and displays a black screen

    When you try to upgrade to Windows XP, your computer might stop responding (hang) and a black screen might be displayed. This is usually caused by hardware or software that is incompatible with Windows XP.
    Note: Before beginning Setup, you should compare your system's hardware to the Hardware Compatibility List (HCL). You can also find information about each of your computer's devices (such as printers, scanners, and so on) at the device manufacturer's Web site, in the Windows Catalog:
    Text version of the HCL (for all operating systems)
    (https://winqual.microsoft.com/download/default.asp)
    Text version of the HCL (for Windows XP only)
    (https://winqual.microsoft.com/download/display.asp?FileName=hcl/WinXPHCLx86.txt)
    The Windows Catalog
    (http://www.microsoft.com/windows/catalog/)
    You can get to all of the above from Windows Hardware and Driver Central (Windows 7 Compatibility: Software Programs & Hardware Devices: Find Updates, Drivers, & Downloads)
    If your computer stops responding and displays a black screen during Setup, follow these steps:

    1. Wait at the black screen for 10 minutes to make sure that the computer does not continue with the Setup procedure. Watch the hard drive indicator to see if there is any disk activity. Setup might resolve the problem on its own.
    2. Restart the computer to see if it stops again at the same place during Setup. Occasionally, Setup will proceed farther than the last time it stopped responding. If this occurs, restart your computer several times so that Setup will finish.
    3. If steps 1 and 2 don't work, to revert back to Windows 98 or Windows Millennium Edition, restart the computer and choose the option to Cancel Windows XP Setup. If canceling Windows XP Setup is not an option when you restart your computer, see step 5.
    4. After you revert back to Windows 98 or Windows Millennium Edition, uninstall all virus protection programs, uninstall all boot manager programs (such as GoBack), and then perform a clean boot of your computer.
    5. If the upgrade fails again, there might be a hardware incompatibility issue. You can try to disable ACPI functionality. To do this, when your computer restarts, watch for an option to press F6 to install SCSI drivers. On this screen, press F7 (not F6).
    6. If Setup continues to stop responding, disable any unnecessary hardware. Remove any USB devices, remove or disable network cards, sound cards, and serial cards, and then restart Setup.
    7. If you continue to receive this error message, you might need to flash (update) the BIOS on the motherboard. Please refer to the manufacturer of your computer or to the motherboard Web site for information about how to flash the BIOS. Warning: Do not attempt to flash the BIOS unless you are an advanced user. Doing this incorrectly can make your computer unusable.
    8. If a BIOS update does not resolve the issue, or if you are unable to obtain an updated BIOS version for the computer, you might want to install Windows XP with a Standard PC Hardware Abstraction Layer (HAL). To do so, press F7 (not F6) when you are prompted to press F6 after Setup restarts the computer for the first time. For more information about how to force the Standard PC HAL, see Microsoft Knowledge Base article 299340: How to Force a HAL During Windows XP Setup.
    You receive an error message or Stop message during Setup

    If you receive one of the following error messages during Setup, refer to the appropriate Microsoft Knowledge Base article:
    311562: 'An Unexpected Error (768) Occurred at Line 5118@ind:Xp\Client\Boot\Setup\Setup.c' Error Message During Windows XP Setup
    311564: 'Stop 0x0000000A Irql_Not_Less_or_Equal' Error Message During Windows XP Upgrade
    311442: Error Message: Setup Cannot Continue. Please Contact Microsoft Technical Support. (Error: 3E6h)
    Troubleshooting other errors:

    Note: If you experience problems during installation, you can use the Windows Memory Diagnostic tool to test your computer's random access memory (RAM). This tool helps determine whether installation problems are caused by failing hardware, such as RAM or the memory system of the motherboard. To use the tool, follow the instructions on the Windows Memory Diagnostic (Microsoft Online Crash Analysis) Web site.
     
  6. MziziMkavu

    MziziMkavu JF-Expert Member

    #6
    Nov 18, 2010
    Joined: Feb 3, 2009
    Messages: 38,511
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    Installation overview

    This release of Windows XP includes Service Pack 2 (SP2) for Windows XP. If you uninstall this release of Windows XP, SP2 is automatically uninstalled too. Your computer will be running the operating system that it was running before you installed Windows XP, or it will not be running an operating system. You cannot uninstall SP2 only.
    Important

    • You can install Windows XP Home Edition with Service Pack 2 or Windows XP Professional with Service Pack 2 on computers that are running the following operating systems:
      • Microsoft Windows 98
      • Windows 98 Second Edition
      • Windows NT 4.0 Workstation
      • Windows Millennium Edition
      • Windows 2000 Professional
      • Windows XP Home Edition
      • Windows XP Professional
    • If you want to upgrade Microsoft Windows 95 to Windows XP Home Edition or Windows XP Professional, you must first uninstall Windows 95, and then perform a new installation.
    • If you are installing Windows XP on an older computer, it's a good idea to check with your computer manufacturer to see whether a BIOS upgrade is available before you proceed.
     
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