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Sikio hufanyaje kazi?

Discussion in 'JF Doctor' started by Washawasha, Dec 31, 2010.

  1. Washawasha

    Washawasha JF-Expert Member

    #1
    Dec 31, 2010
    Joined: Aug 7, 2006
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    Heri ya mwaka mpya madk wote ambao ndio wasaidizi we2 tukutwapo na matatizo,nilikuwa naomba kujuzwa hivi SIKIO hufanyaje kazi yake?
     
  2. Rungu

    Rungu JF-Expert Member

    #2
    Dec 31, 2010
    Joined: Feb 23, 2007
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    Washawasha, nadhani hii atiko inaweza kusaidia kujibu swali lako.

    How does the ear work?

    The ear is the major organ of our auditory system which helps to detect and perceive sound waves. Understanding how does the ear work involves an understanding of its parts.

    [​IMG]
    Parts of the Ear


    In general, the ear consists of three major sections, namely the outer, middle, and inner ear. Sound detection, hearing, and balance are the main functions of our ear. Here's a short description of how we detect and perceive sound.

    How Does the Ear Work
    Sound from the external environment is collected by our outer ear and then funneled down to the outer ear or ear canal. Sound vibrations causes movement in the eardrum along with a chain of three small bones that are connected to it. This is the middle ear. The middle ear is responsible for intensifying the energy coming from the sound vibrations and also for delivering the vibrations to the inner ear or the cochlea.

    Within the cochlea are tiny hair-like cells which are connected to the fibers found in the acoustic or hearing nerve. The sound vibrations which enter the cochlea create a certain wave, which travels through our fluid-filled ear.

    The wave will then result in a movement of the hair-like cells which will then generate the electro-chemical signals. The signals will then travel via the acoustic nerve to our brain where they become recognized as sound.

    How Sound Is Heard
    Based from the brief description it is pretty easy to understand how does the ear work in terms of how the parts work together to coordinate in the sensing, collection, and interpreting different sound waves.

    Each part of the ear is responsible for specific tasks and functions. The outer or external ear functions to collect the sound waves and channels them to the middle ear. During this process, our ear flap will first receive sound waves which will then be transferred to the eardrum or tympanic membrane through the ear canal. The length of our ear canal will affect the amplification of the sound.

    Also in the ear canal are sweat glands which secrete wastes in the form of earwax. If there is too much earwax present in the ear, it can hamper your ability to hear. It may also lead to common ear infections and in some cases, hearing loss.

    The Eardrum
    The different sound waves which the external ear collects remain as pressure waves until they have traveled to the eardrum. The eardrum is the ear's flexible membrane which vibrates upon receiving pressure waves.

    When sound waves reach the middle ear where the eardrum is located, the auditory ossicles will vibrate as a response to the sound waves received and will then convert the sound into a compressional wave.

    The stirrup bone connects the middle ear to the inner ear. When the stirrup bone transmits vibrations into the inner ear, compressional waves are created.

    Other Functions of the Ear
    In addition to helping you hear, the ear also does other things as well. Another function of the ear is to maintain balance. There are tree canals in the inner ear. Every time we turn our heads into a different position, this results in a movement of fluids inside these canals which help the brain in identifying the positioning and movement of the head.

    Problems with the Ear
    Ear function may be affected by defect, injury, or disease. Examples of problems include sensorineural and conductive hearing loss, bacterial, fungal, and viral infections, vestibular neuronitis, and cholesteatoma.

    Should you experience any problem with your ears, do not immediately conclude that you have a disease or ear defect. Sometimes excessive ear wax can be the main cause of your inability to hear. You should consult with medical professionals to properly address your concerns.

    It is also quite common for parents and their children to visit clinics and hospitals to have themselves checked for an ear infection. Ear infections are mostly common in children. Most children will have developed at least one ear infection before they reach the age of three. In most medical cases, ear infections are commonly associated with certain allergies, flu, and colds. There are several symptoms that signify an ear infection such as a severe earache, ear discharge, dizziness, vomiting, fever, impaired hearing, and loss of balance.

    Author: Christy Rakoczy
     
  3. Washawasha

    Washawasha JF-Expert Member

    #3
    Dec 31, 2010
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    Thanks 4 tha article
     
  4. Rungu

    Rungu JF-Expert Member

    #4
    Dec 31, 2010
    Joined: Feb 23, 2007
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    You are welcome!
     
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