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Shahzad Faisal arrested as The Times Square Car Bomb Suspect

Discussion in 'International Forum' started by Ab-Titchaz, May 4, 2010.

  1. Ab-Titchaz

    Ab-Titchaz Content Manager Staff Member

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    [​IMG]

    A man has been arrested in connection with Saturday's attempted car bombing in New York's Times Square.


    According to NBC, the suspect's name is Shahzad Faisal, a 30-year-old U.S. citizen of Pakistani descent. They report that the Connecticut native was arrested at JFK International Airport, apparently trying to flee the country.

    CNN and the New York Times are also reporting that an arrest was made, either late Monday evening or early Tuesday morning, at JFK.

    There is a listing on Facebook for a Shahzad Faisal, whose photo is taken in front of the Macy's department store in New York's Herald Square, just 10 blocks from Times Square.

    There is no way to confirm that it is the same man authorities arrested, but the Facebook page, pasted below, is listed as a fan of both a restaurant in Karachi, Pakistan and the mayor of Karachi.


    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2010/05/04/shahzad-faisal-arrested-f_n_562038.html
     
  2. Ab-Titchaz

    Ab-Titchaz Content Manager Staff Member

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    [​IMG]
     
  3. Ab-Titchaz

    Ab-Titchaz Content Manager Staff Member

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    [​IMG]

    Federal agents and police detectives arrested a Connecticut man, a naturalized United States citizen from Pakistan, early Tuesday in connection with the failed Times Square car bombing, according to people briefed on the investigation.

    The man, Faisal Shahzad, was believed to have recently bought the 1993 Nissan Pathfinder that was found loaded with gasoline, propane, fireworks and fertilizer in the heart of Times Square, one of the people briefed on the development said.

    Mr. Shahzad was taken into custody at Kennedy Airport, apparently trying to flee, one of the people said. Charges against Mr. Shahzad, who had returned recently from a trip to Pakistan, were not announced.

    The authorities began focusing on him after they tracked the vehicle to its previously registered owner in Bridgeport, Conn., who had advertised it for sale on several Web sites. He paid cash, and the sale was handled without any formal paperwork.

    The former owner told investigators that it appeared the buyer was of Middle Eastern or Hispanic descent, but could not recall his name. It was unclear how agents from the Joint Terrorist Task Force identified him. Federal authorities provided few details on Monday night about the arrest, the suspect or the scope of any conspiracy in the failed attack.

    The authorities have been exploring whether the man or others who might have been involved in the attempted bombing had been in contact with people or groups overseas, according to federal officials.

    The investigation was shifted on Monday to the control of the international terrorism branch of the Joint Terrorism Task Force, a multiagency group led by the Justice Department, according to two federal officials.

    Officials cautioned that the investigation of possible international contacts did not mean there was a connection to a known terrorist group, but they said they were exploring all possibilities.

    “It’s a prominent lead that they’re following, the international association,” said a senior official, who spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss a continuing investigation. “But there’s still a lot of information being gathered.”

    On Monday, prior to the arrest, there was a sweeping response to the attempted attack in the tourist-packed city-within-a-city of Times Square — including an increased police presence, vehicle inspections and a touch of panic from veteran New Yorkers when a manhole fire flared five blocks from the scene of the failed bombing. Consolidated Edison blamed faulty wiring for the fire.

    The recent sale of the Pathfinder began online. An advertisement that appears to be for the vehicle, which had 141,000 miles on the odometer and was listed for sale at $1,300 on at least two Web sites, emphasized that it was in good condition — “CLEAN inside and out!!” — with a recently repaired alternator and a new gas pump, distributor and front tires. “It does have some rust as you can see in the picture,” the seller allowed on NothingButCars.net, “but other than that, it runs great.” The other advertisement appeared on Craigslist.

    In Bridgeport, the seller refused to answer questions. “You can’t interview her,” said an unidentified man at the woman’s two-story, white clapboard house. “She already talked to the F.B.I.”

    The police earlier on Monday continued sifting through footage from 82 city cameras mounted from 34th Street to 51st Street between Avenue of the Americas and Eighth Avenue, and from untold number of business and tourist cameras.

    But investigators appeared to have begun to assign less significance to a man who appeared to be in his 40s who was seen on one video, and it may well be because they were close to arresting the Connecticut man.
    The man in the video was seen walking away from the area where the Pathfinder was parked and through Shubert Alley, which runs between 44th and 45th Streets. He looked over his shoulder at least twice and pulled off a shirt, revealing a red T-shirt underneath.

    The New York police commissioner, Raymond W. Kelly, said investigators still wanted to speak to that man, but acknowledged that he might not be connected to the failed bombing. Paul J. Browne, the department’s top spokesman, said the police had stopped looking for additional video in the area that might have tracked the man’s movements.

    “It may turn out that he was just somebody in the area, but not connected with the car bomb,” Mr. Browne said.

    Before the arrest occurred, the police had said they might release footage of a man running north on Broadway at the time that a fire broke out in the Pathfinder.

    Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. seemed optimistic in comments he made Monday morning. “I think that we have made really substantial progress,” he told reporters in Washington. “We have some good leads.”

    The materials found in the Pathfinder were to be sent to the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s laboratory in Quantico, Va., for analysis, the police said. Janet Napolitano, the homeland security secretary, said on the “Today” show that it was premature to label any person or group as suspect. “Right now, every lead has to be pursued,” she said. “I caution against premature decisions one way or the other.” But the White House made clear that it considered the effort an act of terrorism, whoever its authors were. “I think anybody that has the type of material that they had in a car in Times Square, I would say that that was intended to terrorize, absolutely,” said the White House spokesman, Robert Gibbs.


    Reporting was contributed by Alison Leigh Cowan, Robert Davey, Nate Schweber, Michael Wilson and Karen Zraick.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/05/04/nyregion/04bomb.html?partner=rss&emc=rss
     
  4. Ab-Titchaz

    Ab-Titchaz Content Manager Staff Member

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  5. Baba_Enock

    Baba_Enock JF-Expert Member

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    I hope this is not linked to Al-Qaeda!





     
  6. N

    Nanu JF-Expert Member

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    Let's wait and see the results of the investigations!!
     
  7. ngoshwe

    ngoshwe JF-Expert Member

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    Poor Shahzad Faisal.... Obvious the mission was impossible as was well unorganised. It is a very close collaborative facts to trap him.

    How the plan was ?? recently from Pakistan, bought a car in US and then tryin to flee to Dubai immediately upon occurance of the event!.
     
  8. Ami

    Ami JF-Expert Member

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    Ever since the US lied to the world about weapons of mass destruction in Iraq which have never been found,I don't believe anything from them besides what I see by myself.
    Currently I know that there is huge oil slick in around New Orleans which is threatening Eastern coast.Neither BP nor America has been able to stop and clean.
     
  9. Aza

    Aza JF-Expert Member

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    sick and tired of all these stuffs!!
     
  10. MziziMkavu

    MziziMkavu JF-Expert Member

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    NYC bomb suspect nabbed aboard Dubai-bound plane


    [​IMG] AP – FBI search a house where Faisal Shahzad lived in Bridgeport, Conn., Tuesday, May 4, 2010. Shahzad was …





    By TOM HAYS and COLLEEN LONG, Associated Press Writers Tom Hays And Colleen Long, Associated Press Writers – 53 mins ago
    NEW YORK – A U.S. citizen who had recently returned from a five-month trip to his native Pakistan, where he had a wife, was arrested at a New York airport on charges that he drove a bomb-laden SUV meant to cause a fireball in Times Square, federal authorities said.
    Faisal Shahzad was on board a Dubai-bound flight at Kennedy Airport when FBI agents and New York Police Department detectives took him into custody late Monday, law enforcement officials said. One official said he claimed to have acted alone.
    U.S. authorities "will not rest until we have brought everyone responsible to justice," Attorney Eric Holder said early Tuesday, suggesting additional suspects are being sought.
    Shahzad, 30, is a naturalized U.S. citizen and had recently returned from a five-month trip to Pakistan, where he had a wife, according to law enforcement officials who spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the investigation into the failed car bombing.
    Investigators hadn't established an immediate connection to the Pakistani Taliban — which had claimed responsibility for the botched bombing in three videos — or any foreign terrorist groups, a law enforcement official told The Associated Press on Tuesday.
    "He's claimed to have acted alone, but these are things that have to be investigated," the official said.
    Another law enforcement official said Shahzad was not known to the U.S. intelligence community before the failed bombing attempt.
    The U.S. attorney's office in Manhattan was handling the case and said Shahzad would appear in court Tuesday, but the charges were not made public. FBI agents searched the home at a known address for Shahzad in Bridgeport, Conn., early Tuesday, said agent Kimberly Mertz, who wouldn't answer questions about the search.


    Authorities removed filled plastic bags from the house overnight in a mixed-race, working-class neighborhood of multi-family homes in Connecticut's largest city. A bomb squad came and went without entering as local police and FBI agents gathered in the cordoned-off street.
    Shahzad was being held in New York overnight and couldn't be contacted. A phone number at a listed address for Shahzad in Shelton, Conn., wasn't in service.
    He used to live in a two-story grayish-brown Colonial with a sloping yard in a working-class neighborhood in Shelton. On Tuesday morning, the home looked as if it had been unoccupied for a while, with grass growing in the driveway and bags of garbage lying about.
    Neighbors offered diverging descriptions of Shahzad but agreed that he kept to himself. One, Brenda Thurman, said Shahzad had told her husband he worked on Wall Street, while another neighbor, Audrey Sokol, said she thought he worked in nearby Norwalk.
    Thurman, 37, said he lived in Shelton with his wife and two small children until last year.
    "He was a little bit strange," she said. "He didn't like to come out during the day."
    Sokol, a teacher who lives next door to Shahzad's old house, said that he would wave and say hello and that he seemed normal to her.
    Law enforcement officials say Shahzad bought the SUV, a 1993 Nissan Pathfinder, from a Connecticut man about three weeks ago and paid cash. The officials spoke to the AP on condition of anonymity because of the sensitive nature of the case.
    The vehicle identification number had been removed from the Pathfinder's dashboard, but it was stamped on the engine, and investigators used it to find the owner of record, who told them he had sold the vehicle to a stranger. As the SUV buyer came into focus, investigators backed off other leads.
    The SUV was parked on Saturday night on a busy midtown Manhattan street near a theater showing "The Lion King." The explosive device inside it had cheap-looking alarm clocks connected to a 16-ounce can filled with fireworks, which were apparently intended to detonate gas cans and set propane tanks afire in a chain reaction "to cause mayhem, to create casualties," police Commissioner Raymond Kelly said.
    A metal rifle cabinet placed in the SUV's cargo area was packed with fertilizer, but NYPD bomb experts believe it was not a type volatile enough to explode like the ammonium nitrate grade fertilizer used in previous terrorist bombings.
    Police said the SUV bomb could have produced "a significant fireball" and sprayed shrapnel with enough force to kill pedestrians and knock out windows.
    A vendor alerted a police officer to the parked SUV, which was smoking. Times Square, clogged with tourists on a warm evening, was shut down for 10 hours. A bomb squad dismantled the explosive device, and no one was hurt.
    But Holder said Americans should remain vigilant.
    "It's clear," he said, "that the intent behind this terrorist act was to kill Americans."
    Authorities did not address Shahzad's plans in Dubai. The airport there is the Middle East's busiest and is a major transit point for passengers traveling between the West and much of Asia, particularly India and Pakistan.
    Dubai-based Emirates airline said three passengers were pulled from Flight EK202, which was delayed for about seven hours. The airline did not identify Shahzad by name or identify the other two passengers.
    The aircraft and passengers were then re-screened before taking off Tuesday morning, and the airline is "cooperating with the local authorities," Emirates said in a statement e-mailed to the AP.
    In Pakistan, Interior Minister Rehman Malik told the AP that authorities had not been formally asked for help in the probe but would cooperate if asked.
    More than a dozen people with American citizenship or residency, like Shahzad, have been accused in the past two years of supporting or carrying out terrorism attempts on U.S. soil, cases that illustrate the threat of violent extremism from within the U.S.
    Among them are Army Maj. Nidal Hasan, a U.S.-born Army psychiatrist of Palestinian descent, charged with fatally shooting 13 people last year at Fort Hood, Texas; Najibullah Zazi, a Denver-area airport shuttle driver who pleaded guilty in February in a plot to bomb New York subways; and a Pennsylvania woman who authorities say became radicalized online as "Jihad Jane" and plotted to kill a Swedish artist whose work offended Muslims.
    ___
    Contributing to this report were Associated Press writer Pete Yost in Washington, AP Video journalist Ted Shaffrey in Bridgeport, Conn., AP photojournalist Doug Healey in Shelton, Conn., and AP writers Chris Brummitt in Islamabad, Adam Schreck in Dubai and John Christoffersen in Shelton, Conn.

    http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/us_times_square_car_bomb
     
  11. Yegomasika

    Yegomasika JF-Expert Member

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    Sasa hii inahusiana vipi na huyu Bwana wanna be terrorist?.
     
  12. Kiranga

    Kiranga JF-Expert Member

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    Dang,

    As a sub issue, who said the American citizenship does not have classes? If you acquire the citizenship through naturalization you will always be identified by that sub-category. Together with a hyphenated qualification denoting your country of origin or ethnicity.
     
  13. Ab-Titchaz

    Ab-Titchaz Content Manager Staff Member

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    [​IMG]

    By ASHRAF KHAN, Associated Press Writer Ashraf Khan, Associated Press Writer – 19 mins ago


    KARACHI, Pakistan – Pakistani authorities have detained several people in connection with the bombing attempt in New York's Times Square, intelligence officials said Tuesday.

    One of the men, identified as Tauseef, was a friend of Faisal Shahzad, the American citizen of Pakistani origin who is in custody in the United States over the failed attack, one official said. He was arrested in the southern city of Karachi, said the official, who like all Pakistani spies refused to be named in the media.

    Another official said several people had been taken into custody in Karachi since the failed attack Saturday. Some media reports described them as relatives of Shahzad.

    Neither said when the detentions had taken place. They said no charges had been filed.

    Shahzad was on board a Dubai-bound flight that was taxiing away from the gate at New York's Kennedy Airport late Monday when the plane was stopped and FBI agents and New York Police Department detectives took him into custody, law enforcement officials said.

    U.S. officials have said the 30-year-old had recently returned from a five-month stay in Pakistan, raising speculation he may have been in contact with al-Qaida or Taliban groups in the South Asian country.

    Pakistani Interior Minister Rehman Malik said initial information showed Shahzad and his family came from the Pabbi region of northwest Pakistan, but that Shahzad had a Karachi identity card.

    "We have to see whether it was an individual act or if it was a collective kind of act," he said.

    Several Pakistani officials said U.S. authorities had not made a formal request for the country to help in the probe.

    Two security officials in the northwest said Shahzad and his family came from the village of Mohib Bandar in Pabbi, but moved to the North Nazimabad district of Karachi several years ago. They said he was a graduate of an engineering college and the son of a senior Pakistani air force officer.

    But a Shahzad family member in the region told a local journalist that the officials were mistaken and that the family had nothing to do with the suspect in the United States. Faisal and Shahzad are very common names in Pakistan.

    One local television report said Shahzad spent time on his recent trip to Pakistan in Karachi and in the northwestern city of Peshawar. Peshawar is a gateway for foreigners seeking to travel into the nearby tribal regions where militant groups have long had sanctuaries.

    Shahzad is suspected of driving a bomb-laden vehicle into Times Square last Saturday and parking it on a street lined with restaurants and Broadway theaters. He was expected in court to face charges later Tuesday.
    ___
    Associated Press writers Zarar Khan in Islamabad and Riaz Khan in Peshawar contributed to this report

    http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/as_pakistan_times_square_arrest
     
  14. Ab-Titchaz

    Ab-Titchaz Content Manager Staff Member

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    [​IMG]
     
  15. ngoshwe

    ngoshwe JF-Expert Member

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    Suspect in Times Square plot faces terror charges


    [​IMG]
    [​IMG] AP – In this photo from the social networking site Orkut.com, a man who was identified by neighbors in Connecticut …

    NEW YORK – A Pakistani-born U.S. citizen was hauled off a plane about to fly to the Middle East and will face terrorism charges in the failed attempt to explode a bomb-laden SUV in the heart of Times Square, authorities said Tuesday. One official said he claimed to be acting alone.
    Faisal Shahzad has admitted his role in the botched bombing attempt and is talking to investigators, providing them with valuable information, Attorney General Eric Holder said.
    The investigation stretched to Pakistan, where intelligence officials said several people had been detained in connection with the Times Square case.
    Shahzad was on board a Dubai-bound flight that was taxiing away from the gate at Kennedy Airport late Monday when the plane was turned around and federal authorities took him into custody, law enforcement officials said. Federal officials had placed him on a "no-fly" list hours before his arrest.
    Shahzad, scheduled to appear later Tuesday in federal court in Manhattan, will face terrorism and weapons of mass destruction charges, Holder said.
    "Based on what we know so far, it is clear that this was a terrorist plot aimed at murdering Americans in one of the busiest places in our country," he added.
    The FBI read Shahzad his constitutional rights after he provided information, and he continued to cooperate, FBI Deputy Director John Pistole said.
    President Barack Obama said the FBI was investigating possible ties between Shahzad and terrorist groups.
    Obama said "hundreds of lives" may have been saved Saturday night by the quick action of ordinary citizens and law enforcement authorities who saw the smoking SUV parked in Times Square.
    "As Americans and as a nation, we will not be terrorized. We will not cower in fear. We will not be intimidated," Obama said.
    Shahzad, 30, had recently returned from a five-month trip to Pakistan, where he had a wife, according to law enforcement officials who spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the investigation into the failed car bombing.
    Shahzad became a naturalized U.S. citizen last year shortly before traveling to Pakistan, a federal law enforcement official in Washington said, speaking on condition of anonymity amid the ongoing investigation.
    Investigators hadn't established an immediate connection to the Pakistani Taliban — which had claimed responsibility for the botched bombing in three videos — or any foreign terrorist groups, a law enforcement official told the AP.
    "He's claimed to have acted alone, but these are things that have to be investigated," the official said.
    A Pakistani TV station reported that Shahzad spent time in the southern city of Karachi and visited the northwestern city of Peshawar during his stay in Pakistan. Peshawar is a gateway for foreigners seeking to travel into nearby tribal regions, where militant groups have long had sanctuary.
    One man detained in Karachi was identified by authorities only as Tauseef and was a friend of Shahzad, according to one official, who spoke on condition of anonymity because Pakistani intelligence officers insist on anonymity as a matter of policy. Media reports described some of the others detained as relatives of Shahzad.
    In Washington, Pakistani Embassy spokesman Nadeem Haider Kiani said it's too soon to tell what motivated the bomber. Asked whether there were ties to foreign terrorist groups, Kiani said early indications suggest the bomber was "a disturbed individual."

    Another law enforcement official said Shahzad was not known to the U.S. intelligence community before the failed bombing attempt, in which authorities found a crude bomb of gasoline, propane and fireworks in a 1993 Nissan Pathfinder parked on a bustling street in Times Square.
    Authorities removed filled plastic bags and a bomb squad came and went from a Bridgeport, Conn., house listed in Shahzad's name Tuesday in a working-class neighborhood of multifamily homes in Connecticut's largest city. FBI agents found a box of consumer-grade firecrackers and other fireworks in the driveway that they were marking off as evidence. Agents wouldn't answer questions at the scene.
    Shahzad was being held in New York and couldn't be contacted. A phone number at a listed address for Shahzad in Shelton, Conn., wasn't in service.
    He used to live in a two-story grayish-brown colonial with a sloping yard in a working-class neighborhood in Shelton. The home looked as if it had been unoccupied for a while, with grass growing in the driveway and bags of garbage lying about.
    Shahzad graduated from the University of Bridgeport with a bachelor's degree in computer applications and information systems in 2000 and later returned to earn a master's of business administration in 2005, the school said.
    A neighbor in Bridgeport described him as quiet.
    "Nobody ever had a problem with him," said Dawn Sampson, 34, who lives across the street from Shahzad's third-floor apartment. She said he had remodeled it and had put on the market to rent for $1,200, a fee she thought was much too high.
    Law enforcement officials say Shahzad paid $1,300 cash three weeks ago for the Pathfinder, going first for a test-drive in a mall and offering less than the $1,800 advertised price. Peggy Colas, 19, of Bridgeport, sold the car to Shahzad after he answered an Internet ad, law enforcement officials said. The officials spoke to the AP on condition of anonymity because of the sensitive nature of the case.
    The vehicle identification number had been removed from the Pathfinder's dashboard, but it was stamped on the engine, and investigators used it to find the owner of record, who told them a stranger bought it. As the SUV buyer came into focus, investigators backed off other leads.
    Shahzad was placed on a "no-fly" list Monday after he was identified as the buyer, Pistole said. Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano declined to say how Shahzad was able to board the flight if he was on the "no-fly" list.
    The bomb-laden SUV was parked near a theater where the musical "The Lion King" was being performed. The bomb inside it had cheap-looking alarm clocks connected to a 16-ounce can filled with fireworks, which were apparently intended to detonate gas cans and set off propane tanks in a chain reaction "to cause mayhem, to create casualties," police Commissioner Raymond Kelly said.
    A metal rifle cabinet in the SUV's cargo area was packed with fertilizer, but NYPD bomb experts believe it was not a type volatile enough to explode like the ammonium nitrate grade fertilizer used in previous terrorist bombings.
    Police said the SUV bomb could have produced "a significant fireball" and sprayed shrapnel with enough force to kill pedestrians and knock out windows.
    A vendor alerted a police officer to the parked SUV, which was smoking. Times Square, clogged with tourists on a warm evening, was shut down for 10 hours. A bomb squad dismantled the bomb and no one was hurt.
    Holder urged Americans should remain vigilant.
    "It's clear that the intent behind this terrorist act was to kill Americans," he said.
    Mayor Michael Bloomberg said the arrest should not be as used as an excuse for anti-Muslim actions. "We will not tolerate any bias or backlash against Pakistani or Muslim New Yorkers," he said.
    Authorities did not address Shahzad's plans in Dubai. The airport there is the Middle East's busiest and is a major transit point for passengers traveling between the West and much of Asia, particularly India and Pakistan.
    Dubai-based Emirates airline said three passengers were pulled from Flight EK202, which was delayed for about seven hours. The airline did not identify Shahzad by name or name the other two passengers.
    The aircraft and passengers were then screened again before taking off Tuesday morning, and the airline is "cooperating with the local authorities," Emirates said in a statement e-mailed to the AP. The other two passengers who had been removed were allowed to get back aboard the flight, the airline said.
    Pakistani Interior Minister Rehman Malik said initial information showed Shahzad and his family came from the Pabbi region of northwest Pakistan, but that Shahzad had a Karachi identity card.
    Several Pakistani officials said the U.S. had not made a formal request for help in the probe.
    Two security officials in the northwest said Shahzad and his family came from the village of Mohib Bandar in Pabbi, but moved to the North Nazimabad district of Karachi several years ago. They said he was a graduate of an engineering college and the son of a senior Pakistani air force officer.
    But a Shahzad family member in the region told a local journalist that the officials were mistaken and that the family had nothing to do with the suspect in the United States. Faisal and Shahzad are very common names in Pakistan.
    More than a dozen people with U.S. citizenship or residency, like Shahzad, have been accused in the past two years of supporting, attempting or carrying out attacks on U.S. soil, illustrating the threat of violent extremism from within the U.S.
    Among them are Army Maj. Nidal Hasan, a U.S.-born Army psychiatrist of Palestinian descent, charged with fatally shooting 13 people last year at Fort Hood, Texas; Najibullah Zazi, a Denver-area airport shuttle driver who pleaded guilty in February in a plot to bomb New York subways; and a Pennsylvania woman who authorities say became radicalized online as "Jihad Jane" and plotted to kill a Swedish artist whose work offended Muslims.
     
  16. Ndjabu Da Dude

    Ndjabu Da Dude JF-Expert Member

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    We are told among other emerging details about Faisal Shahzad:

    "Documents from Connecticut's Milford Superior Court show that Shahzad and Huma Mian purchased a home at 119 Long Hill Ave. in Shelton in July 2004. They took out a mortgage for $218,400 from Chase Manhattan Mortgage Corp.
    Last September, the mortgage company began foreclosure proceedings. As of December 14, Shahzad and Mian owed $207,837."


    He was probably also jobless, and otherwise known to have relocated his family back to Pakistan. To me its plain this dude is just a loser who wanted to have his own back against American society. Given everything else that's written about him, he comes across as a typical sociopath, and prison is where his ass belongs to.
     
  17. MziziMkavu

    MziziMkavu JF-Expert Member

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    [​IMG] Play Video AP – Raw Audio: Plane with NY bomb suspect turns back




    [​IMG] AP – A television at John. F. Kennedy International Airport displays the news that an arrest was made in relation …


    By EILEEN SULLIVAN and MATT APUZZO, Associated Press Writers Eileen Sullivan And Matt Apuzzo, Associated Press Writers – Tue May 4, 7:59 pm ET
    WASHINGTON – The no-fly list failed to keep the Times Square suspect off the plane. Faisal Shahzad had boarded a jetliner bound for the United Arab Emirates Monday night before federal authorities pulled him back.
    The night's events, gradually coming to light, underscored the flaws in the nation's aviation security system, which despite its technologies, lists and information sharing, often comes down to someone making a right call.
    As federal agents closed in, Faisal Shahzad was aboard Emirates Flight 202. He reserved a ticket on the way to John F. Kennedy International Airport, paid cash on arrival and walked through security without being stopped. By the time Customs and Border Protection officials spotted Shahzad's name on the passenger list and recognized him as the bombing suspect they were looking for, he was in his seat and the plane was preparing to leave the gate.
    But it didn't. At the last minute, the pilot was notified, the jetliner's door was opened and Shahzad was taken into custody.
    After authorities pulled Shahzad off the plane, he admitted he was behind the crude Times Square car bomb, officials said. He also claimed to have been trained at a terror camp in Pakistan's lawless tribal region of Waziristan, according to court documents. That raised increased concern that the bombing was an international terror plot.
    Shahzad, a Pakistani-born U.S. citizen, was charged Tuesday with terrorism and attempting to use a weapon of mass destruction in Saturday evening's failed Times Square bombing. According to a federal complaint, he confessed to buying an SUV, rigging it with a homemade bomb and driving it into the busy area where he tried to detonate it.
    The Obama administration played down the fact that Shahzad, a U.S. citizen born in Pakistan, had made it aboard the plane. Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano wouldn't talk about it, other than to say Customs officials prevented the plane from taking off. White House spokesman Robert Gibbs said the security system has fallback procedures in place for times like this, and they worked.
    And Attorney General Eric Holder said he "was never in any fear that we were in danger of losing him."

    Video courtesy of ABC News. For more visit ABC News.com

    But it seemed clear the airline either never saw or ignored key information that would kept Shahzad off the plane, a fact that dampened what was otherwise hailed as a fast, successful law enforcement operation.
    The no-fly list is supposed to mean just that. And Shahzad's name was added to the list early Monday afternoon as a result of breaking developments in the investigation, according to a law enforcement official, speaking on condition of anonymity to discuss an ongoing investigation.
    But when Emirates sold the ticket, it was working off an outdated list. Airline officials would have had to check a Web forum where updates are sent if it were to flag him. Because they didn't, law enforcement officials were not aware of his travel plans until they received the passenger list 30 minutes before takeoff, the official said.
    By that time, passengers are usually on board.
    Gibbs blamed the airline but emphasized a more positive bottom line: U.S. authorities did get Shahzad on the no-fly list and he never took off.
    "There's a series of built-in redundancies, this being one of them," Gibbs said. "If there's a mistake by a carrier, it can be double-checked."



    The list is only as good as the nation's intelligence and the experts who analyze it. If a lead is not shared, or if an analyst is unable to connect one piece of information to another, a terrorist could slip onto an airplane because his name is not on the watch list.
    Officials allege that's just what took place ahead of the attempted Christmas Day attack on a Detroit-bound jet. In the case of the Times Square suspect, the intelligence process worked: Shahzad's name was on the list, but the airlines didn't check it when he bought his ticket.
    Shahzad went through normal airport security before he boarded the plane. He was unarmed and had no explosive material on him when he was arrested.
    Emirates did not return repeated calls for comments. Earlier in the day, the company issued a general statement saying it was cooperating with investigators and takes every precaution to ensure its passengers' safety.
    The reliance on airlines to check government lists has been a known problem for years. The government has long planned to take over the responsibility for matching passengers to watch lists, but the transition has taken longer than expected. The new program is still in the test phase for domestic airlines and is still months away from beginning with international carriers.
    http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20100504/ap_on_go_ot/us_times_square_probe
     
  18. N

    Nanu JF-Expert Member

    #18
    May 5, 2010
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    It is not security guards who saved Americans but the fellow American who became vigilant and reported the vehicle. It is good to be vigilant and take necessary action.
     
  19. ngoshwe

    ngoshwe JF-Expert Member

    #19
    May 5, 2010
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    Pa. fireworks store has video of NYC bomb suspect

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    Reuters – This undated image, obtained from orkut.com on May 4, 2010, shows Faisal Shahzad, the Pakistani-American …

    By COLLEEN LONG and MICHAEL RUBINKAM, Associated Press Writers Colleen Long And Michael Rubinkam, Associated Press Writers – 48 mins ago
    NEW YORK – A man accused of trying to detonate a car bomb in Times Square was videotaped buying consumer-grade fireworks at a Pennsylvania store that a company official said were not nearly strong enough to make a powerful bomb.
    Bruce Zoldan, president of Ohio-based Phantom Fireworks, said Faisal Shahzad, 30, was captured on surveillance video buying fireworks from his company's Matamoras, Pa., showroom, within the last two months.
    "The M-88 he used wouldn't damage a watermelon," Zoldan said. "Thank goodness he used that."
    Shahzad was charged Tuesday with trying to blow up a crude gasoline and propane device inside a parked SUV amid tourists and Broadway theatergoers. He was in custody after being hauled off a Dubai-bound plane he boarded Monday night at Kennedy Airport despite being under surveillance and placed on the federal no-fly list.
    "I was expecting you. Are you NYPD or FBI?" Shahzad told customs officials who came aboard the jet to arrest him, an official with knowledge of the investigation told The Associated Press Wednesday, speaking on condition of anonymity because of the sensitive nature of the case.
    Authorities say Shahzad has admitted his role in the botched bombing plot and is cooperating with investigators, but don't yet know whether others were involved in the plan to blow up the SUV.
    U.S. officials in Washington said Wednesday they've been unable to verify statements that Shahzad trained at a Pakistani terror camp, according to the complaint against him, and haven't linked him to any terror group.
    Meanwhile, the official told the AP that the video police released right after the botched bombing of a man shedding his shirt near the SUV had the unintended effect of falsely reassuring the real suspect he wasn't a target.
    The unidentified man was never referred to as a suspect, but Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly said in his first briefing after the failed bombing that police sought to interview him. Investigators believe he is not involved with the attack, the official said. Police have not interviewed the man.
    Authorities said Shahzad was not expected to appear in federal court on Wednesday. His appearance was canceled Tuesday in part because of Shahzad's continuing cooperation with investigators, but authorities said they had shed little light on what might have motivated him.
    Until recently, his life in the U.S. appeared enviable. He had a master's degree from the University of Bridgeport in Connecticut, a job as a budget analyst for a marketing firm in Norwalk, Conn., two children and a well-educated wife who posted his smiling picture and lovingly called him "my everything" on a social networking website.
    But shortly after becoming a U.S. citizen a year ago, he gave up his job, stopped paying his mortgage and told a real estate agent to let the bank take the house because he was returning to Pakistan.
    Once there, according to investigators, he traveled to the lawless Waziristan region and learned bomb making at a terrorist training camp.
    In court papers, investigators said Shahzad returned to the U.S. on Feb. 3, moved into an apartment in a low-rent section of Bridgeport, then set about acquiring materials and an SUV he bought with cash in late April. They said that after his arrest, Shahzad confessed to rigging the bomb and driving it into Times Square. He also acknowledged getting training in Pakistan, the filing said.
    The investigation of the fizzled bomb attack unfolded quickly, with a suspect in custody in only 53 hours - but it didn't go off without a hitch.
    After identifying Shahzad through the previous owner of the SUV, investigators had him under surveillance when he nearly slipped away.
    Authorities initially planned to arrest him at his Connecticut home but lost track of him, two people familiar with the probe told the AP. The people spoke on condition of anonymity because they weren't authorized to talk publicly about the breach in surveillance.

    Kelly played down the slip on the morning TV talk shows Wednesday, telling ABC's "Good Morning America" that "it's not unusual in an investigation" to briefly lose track of the target.
    Emirates airlines also didn't initially notice when Shahzad purchased a ticket that he had been placed on the government's no-fly list, according to a law enforcement official. Emirates said in a statement Wednesday that it is in "full compliance" with U.S. passenger check-in procedures and works closely with the government to regularly update security watch lists.
    The government will now require airlines to check updated no-fly lists within two hours of being notified of changes to the list, a Homeland Security official said Wednesday. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak publicly about the change.
    Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano credited customs officials with recognizing Shahzad's name on a passenger manifest and stopping the flight. Agents apprehended him on the plane.
    A gun was discovered in the car Shahzad left at the airport, investigators said. Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly told a Senate hearing Wednesday that Shahzad purchased the gun in Connecticut and March.
    Kifyat Ali, a cousin of Shahzad's father, spoke with reporters outside a two-story home the family owns in an upscale part of Peshawar, Pakistan. He said the family had yet to be officially informed of Shahzad's arrest, which he called "a conspiracy so the (Americans) can bomb more Pashtuns," a reference to a major ethnic group in Peshawar and the nearby tribal areas of Pakistan and southwest Afghanistan.
    The Pakistani Taliban has claimed responsibility for the Times Square car bomb plot, but U.S. officials said they are still investigating. Federal authorities are looking into possible financing of Shahzad's activities by the group, according to one of the law enforcement officials who spoke to the AP. A spokesman for Pakistan's army said Wednesday that it does not believe the insurgent group was behind the attempt.
    In Pakistan, authorities detained several people, although the FBI said it had no confirmation that those arrests were relevant to the case. One of several people detained for questioning is a man named Mohammad Rehan, an activist related to an al-Qaida-linked militatnt group picked up at a mosque in Karachi, a senior security official told the AP, speaking on condition of anonymity because of the sensitive nature of the information. Shahzad is believed to have spent time in Karachi on his most recent trip to Pakistan last year.
     
  20. bona

    bona JF-Expert Member

    #20
    May 8, 2010
    Joined: Nov 6, 2009
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    this is the problem of people from that part of the world, they run away from their country looking for better lives in other peoples country, after all that these are the kind of gratitude they show! pricks
     
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