Dismiss Notice
You are browsing this site as a guest. It takes 2 minutes to CREATE AN ACCOUNT and less than 1 minute to LOGIN

‘Serial ritual killer’ faces charges

Discussion in 'Jukwaa la Sheria (The Law Forum)' started by ByaseL, Feb 12, 2010.

  1. B

    ByaseL JF-Expert Member

    Feb 12, 2010
    Joined: Nov 22, 2007
    Messages: 2,218
    Likes Received: 12
    Trophy Points: 135
    BBC journalist insists story is accurate

    Pollino Angela, the 50-year-old man who recently confessed to committing 70 ritual murders, including that of his son, has told Police that his story was false.

    He claims he was bribed by foreign journalists to tell lies. Angela told a BBC journalist, Tim Whewell, in Lira last year that he killed about 70 people over the past 22 years that he spent practising witchcraft (see The Observer, January 11, 2010).

    His story was broadcast by the BBC in a 15-minute documentary made by Whewell with the help of a local NGO, the African Network for the Prevention and Protection against Child Abuse and Neglect (ANPPCAN).

    The documentary, aired by the BBC on January 10-20, is estimated to have been watched by about 65 million people around the world.

    But a statement released by the head of the Anti-Human Sacrifice and Trafficking Task Force in the Police, Moses Binoga, who investigated the matter, said Angela’s story was false.

    “He confessed that the whole story, as quoted by the British journalist, was false and said that he had been promised funds from donors to run his Fr. Russo Foundation if he gave a fantastic story about traditional healing and human sacrifice in Uganda,” Binoga said.

    The Police officer said that Angela was paid Shs 200,000 while other “actors” in the documentary were each paid Shs 50,000 for their role.

    Binoga said that Angela told Police in Lira that his son, whom he claimed in the documentary that he killed, actually died of natural causes and had been “decently” buried in a family cemetery.

    Police said the man will now be charged with giving false information. “More investigations are going on with the Inspector General of Police and a more conclusive report will be submitted very soon,” Binoga said.

    Binoga accused the BBC journalist of “editing the documentary to make it seem like child sacrifice is at its worst here [in Uganda], which is not the case.”

    However, despite this denial, a study conducted by the Ministry of Gender, Labour and Social Development on child sacrifice last year, highlights many cases of child sacrifice are not reported to the Police.

    The 2009 Police report on human sacrifice shows that up to 29 persons, 15 of them children, were victims of ritual murder. The report added that of the 123 persons who went missing in 2009, 90 of them (73%) were children suspected to have become victims of human sacrifice.

    Whewell told The Observer by e-mail that he did not bribe Angela to make the confession.
    “His story is quite well-known in the Lango sub-region. He was a witch-doctor for 22 years – enough time to be involved in 70 human sacrifices.