Dismiss Notice
You are browsing this site as a guest. It takes 2 minutes to CREATE AN ACCOUNT and less than 1 minute to LOGIN

Nelson Mandela:20yrs Baada ya kuachiwa huru.

Discussion in 'International Forum' started by Darling, Feb 11, 2010.

  1. D

    Darling Member

    #1
    Feb 11, 2010
    Joined: Jul 30, 2007
    Messages: 69
    Likes Received: 0
    Trophy Points: 0
    What a wonderful wife; first lady with all talents.
    Ameizing.

    Leo mandela ametimiza 20 years; as a free man. Amongst the entertainer was mke wa rais wa ufaransa.

    Mwe! i guss husband yake is very luck and proud of her.

    [ame="http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/21134540/vp/32013432#32013432"]http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/21134540/vp/32013432#32013432[/ame]
     
  2. PakaJimmy

    PakaJimmy JF-Expert Member

    #2
    Feb 11, 2010
    Joined: Apr 29, 2009
    Messages: 16,234
    Likes Received: 101
    Trophy Points: 145
    Godness!!...Nilidhani Firstlady wa hapa JF!

    Hakuna lolote hapo, tena hao wa hivi wala hutasikia sauti yake ndani kwenu!.
    Hujawahi kuona tajiri anaacha wanae na njaa?
    Una maana mume wake atakuwa anapata lullaby kila anapolala?
     
  3. I

    Irizar JF-Expert Member

    #3
    Feb 11, 2010
    Joined: Oct 6, 2009
    Messages: 217
    Likes Received: 0
    Trophy Points: 0
    Sisi pia tuko proud na wa kwetu woteeee Tanzania, hasa aliyepita she knew how kusukuma mipango ya MABIASHARA NA MAPESA kumbeeeee jeee and am sure the husband was proud too kwa kumsaidia kufanya biashara IKULU na kukwapuwaaaa mahela
     
  4. D

    Darling Member

    #4
    Feb 11, 2010
    Joined: Jul 30, 2007
    Messages: 69
    Likes Received: 0
    Trophy Points: 0


    Ooooh my god!
     
  5. MziziMkavu

    MziziMkavu JF-Expert Member

    #5
    Feb 12, 2010
    Joined: Feb 3, 2009
    Messages: 38,505
    Likes Received: 2,773
    Trophy Points: 280
    His release from prison in 1990 marked a death knell for white rule

    [​IMG]Video
    [​IMG]
    Mandela's prison release remembered
    Feb. 11: Nelson Mandela made a rare and emotional appearance in South Africa Thursday to mark the 20th anniversary of his release from prison after spending 27 years in jail for protesting apartheid. NBC's Brian Williams reports.
    Nightly News


    [​IMG]Archival video
    [​IMG]
    A tribute to Nelson Mandela
    July 18, 2008: On the 90th birthday of former South African president Nelson Mandela, TODAY’s Ann Curry looks back at his life with photojournalist David Turnley.
    Today show


    [​IMG]Archival video
    [​IMG]
    Behind bars
    Feb. 1990: NBC’s Robin Lloyd reports on Nelson Mandela on the eve of his release from prison in 1990.


    JOHANNESBURG - South African lawmakers sang Nelson Mandela's praises Thursday as the anti-apartheid icon settled into parliament's public gallery for a State of the Nation address scheduled in tribute to his 20 years of freedom.
    Mandela was released in 1990 after spending 27 years in prison and went on to lead South Africa through the last stretch of a stunning, peaceful revolution from apartheid to democracy.
    His release was remembered as triumphant Thursday, but the moment was uncertain and anxious for South Africa, and it is a testimony to Mandela's statesmanship that things went so well.
    "When Mandela was released we did not know what was going happen," said Nontuntuzelo Faku, who joined thousands of people who marked Thursday's anniversary near Cape Town at what was known in 1990 as Victor Verster, the last prison where Mandela was held.
    Being at the prison 20 years later, Faku said, "makes me realize how far the country has come."
    In 2008, a 3-meter (10-feet) high bronze statue was erected at the prison depicting Mandela's first steps as a free man. Exactly 20 years ago, Mandela emerged from Victor Verster on foot, hand-in-hand with his then-wife Winnie, fist raised, smiling but resolute.
    Whites shocked and confused
    The release of Mandela, known affectionately by his clan name, Madiba, was the culmination of an eventful few days for South Africa. On Feb. 2, then-President F.W. de Klerk announced the unbanning of the ANC and other organizations. On Feb. 10, de Klerk announced at a press conference that Mandela would be released the next day.
    Whites conditioned to see Mandela as a a shadowy enemy — most did not know what he looked like because images of him had been banned — were shocked and confused. Blacks were uncertain that Mandela, who had begun negotiations with the white government from the isolation of prison, was right to trust de Klerk. Civil war seemed possible.
    "I think the imprint of February is deeply etched into the psyche of our nation," Mac Maharaj, a key ANC leader at the time, told The Associated Press. "That image of Madiba, Winnie, walking out of Victor Verster, holding hands. Madiba looking quite, quite somber, not celebratory, not pumping the air and jumping about like a victorious boxer, but walking very sternly, and I think I see a sense of bewilderment in him."
    In a chapter of his autobiography titled simply "Freedom," Mandela said he was surprised so many people had come to greet him outside the prison. He described his joy, but also his realization that much work remained ahead.
    "It was vital for me to show my people and the government that I was unbroken and unbowed, and that the struggle was not over for me but beginning anew in a different form," he wrote.
    Today, aides say Mandela is frail but in good health for a man who will be 92 in July. He has largely retired from public life, but appeared to revel in the attention at parliament Thursday evening. He moved stiffly before taking a chair and smiling broadly as members of parliament sang a song honoring him. President Jacob Zuma scheduled his address to coincide with the anniversary as a tribute.
    [​IMG]Slideshow
    [​IMG]
    A revolutionary's life
    View images of Nelson Mandela – who went from anti-apartheid activist to prisoner to South Africa’s first black president.
    more photos

    ‘Building a better future’
    Zuma devoted his speech, which Mandela could be seen reading as he spoke, largely to an economy hit hard by the global downturn. But the president took time to praise Mandela and call on South Africans to recommit themselves to Mandela's ideals: "Building a better future for all South Africans, black and white."
    Zuma emulated Mandela by reaching out to white conservatives during the speech with praise for the late President P.W. Botha for initiating discussions about the release of political prisoners. Botha, who died in 2006, was president from 1978 until 1989 and was seen by many as the last hard-line apartheid leader. When white rule ended, Botha refused to testify before the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, which investigated the atrocities of apartheid and offered the possibility of amnesty to those willing to confess to their crimes and demonstrate remorse.
    Just four years after Mandela's release, South Africans held their first all-race elections, making Mandela their first black president. Mandela stepped down after one five-year term, helping to entrench democracy in South Africa in contrast to elsewhere on the continent where politicians hung on to power through fraud and violence.
    CONTINUED : Racial reconciliation1 | 2 | Next >

    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/35343367/ns/world_news-africa/
     
  6. Ab-Titchaz

    Ab-Titchaz Content Manager Staff Member

    #6
    Feb 12, 2010
    Joined: Jan 30, 2008
    Messages: 14,702
    Likes Received: 15
    Trophy Points: 0
    Nelson Mandela's 1990 release marked in South Africa

    [​IMG]

    Winnie Madikizela-Mandela (L) sits beside her ex-husband, South Africa's former president Nelson Mandela (C), and his wife Graca Machel (R) at the gallery during the opening of Parliament in Cape Town February 11, 2010.


    Celebrations are being held to mark 20 years since the release from prison of Nelson Mandela, a key step towards ending apartheid in South Africa.
    In Cape Town, prominent figures took part in a commemorative walk at the prison where he spent the final months of his 27-year imprisonment.

    Mr Mandela, 91, was cheered when he came to parliament to hear a speech by current President Jacob Zuma.

    Mr Zuma said South Africa continued to follow its first black leader's vision.
    Mr Mandela spent most of his sentence in Robben Island prison, off the coast of Cape Town, and later in Pollsmoor Prison on the mainland.

    Before his release, he lived in a cottage in the grounds of Victor Verster prison in a rural area some 50km (31 miles) from Cape Town, with his own cook.

    'Gratitude'

    Thursday's re-enactment walk went through the gates of Victor Verster prison, now known as Drakenstein prison, where a statue of Mr Mandela stands with its hand upraised.

    Cyril Ramaphosa, who was among the veterans of the anti-apartheid struggle taking part in the walk, recalled Mr Mandela's crucial role.

    "We are celebrating a life that has been lived in service of our people," he said.
    "He knew he needed to continue living for the people that were outside. Without the struggle of our people, Madiba would have never been released," he added, using Mr Mandela's clan name.

    Mr Mandela's former wife, Winnie Mandela, had been due to lead the walk, but a spokesman said on Thursday morning that she would not be appearing because it would have been "too painful".

    Poppy Shabalala, a 65-year-old local resident, said she had turned out to celebrate Mr Mandela's legacy.

    "He did the unthinkable," she said. "Mandela united black and white people and ended apartheid. I am here today to show my gratitude for what he did."

    'Good solution'

    Mr Mandela, who did not join in the re-enactment, arrived at parliament in Cape Town ahead of Mr Zuma's special address to the nation.

    His grandson, Mandla Mandela, said the family had tried to ensure he got "a lot of rest during the day so he could be fresh and energetic in the evening to attend parliament".

    Mr Zuma told MPs and other dignitaries that it was a "day to celebrate a watershed moment" which had changed South Africa.

    Mr Mandela, he said, had united the country behind the goal of a non-sexist, non-racist, prosperous society.

    Recognising his country's current economic problems, he said that the government had met, nearly in its entirety, its promise last year to create jobs through public works.

    "Economic indicators suggest that we are now turning the corner," he said. "Economic activity is rising in South Africa, and we expect growth going forward."

    He said the size of the police force would be increased by 10% in the next three years to help fight crime, and added that everything was in place to host a successful 2010 football World Cup.

    "We have spent many years planning for this World Cup," he said. "We have only three months to go and we are determined to make a success of it."

    Mr Mandela was sentenced to life imprisonment in 1964 for plotting to overthrow the government by violence.

    During his years in prison he became an international symbol of resistance to apartheid.

    In 1990, the South African government responded to internal and international pressure and freed him, at the same time lifting the ban against the anti-apartheid African National Congress (ANC).

    Christo Brand, the former prison warden assigned to guard Mr Mandela, said of events 20 years ago: "I hoped there would be no bloodshed. There was no bloodshed. Everything worked out perfectly.

    "And I know the way Mandela does negotiations, he was really thinking of the other side, too.

    "He not only thinks of the black people of the country, but thinking also of the whites and studying and feeling the fears of the whites in this country.

    "And I think through that fear, he came up and thought of a good solution for South Africa."

    Archbishop Desmond Tutu, another key player in the fight against apartheid, said the day of Mr Mandela's release was "a day that promised the beginning of the end of indignity".

    But he added that while much had been achieved, more remained to be done.
    "If we really want to make a difference we must recapture the spirit of that day of Nelson Mandela's release," he said.

    In 1991 Mr Mandela became the ANC's leader. He was president of South Africa from 1994 until 1999, when he stood down - one of the few African leaders at the time to voluntarily give up power.

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/8509785.stm
     
  7. Ab-Titchaz

    Ab-Titchaz Content Manager Staff Member

    #7
    Feb 12, 2010
    Joined: Jan 30, 2008
    Messages: 14,702
    Likes Received: 15
    Trophy Points: 0
    [​IMG]

    Hundreds of people, some wearing yellow T-shirts bearing Nelson Mandela's image, retraced his final walk to freedom, chanting "Viva Madiba", his clan name.

    [​IMG]
     
  8. Ab-Titchaz

    Ab-Titchaz Content Manager Staff Member

    #8
    Feb 12, 2010
    Joined: Jan 30, 2008
    Messages: 14,702
    Likes Received: 15
    Trophy Points: 0
    [​IMG]

    The commemorative walk went through the gates of Victor Verster prison, now known as Drakenstein prison, where a statue of Mr Mandela stands with its hand upraised.
     
  9. Ab-Titchaz

    Ab-Titchaz Content Manager Staff Member

    #9
    Feb 12, 2010
    Joined: Jan 30, 2008
    Messages: 14,702
    Likes Received: 15
    Trophy Points: 0
    [​IMG]

    Cyril Ramaphosa, who was among the veterans of the anti-apartheid struggle taking part in the walk, recalled Mr Mandela's crucial role.
     
  10. Ab-Titchaz

    Ab-Titchaz Content Manager Staff Member

    #10
    Feb 12, 2010
    Joined: Jan 30, 2008
    Messages: 14,702
    Likes Received: 15
    Trophy Points: 0
    [​IMG]
     
  11. Ab-Titchaz

    Ab-Titchaz Content Manager Staff Member

    #11
    Feb 12, 2010
    Joined: Jan 30, 2008
    Messages: 14,702
    Likes Received: 15
    Trophy Points: 0
    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

    1952 - Mandela Opens his Law Office in Johannesburg

    [​IMG]

    A view from the Robben Island Cell​
     
  12. Ab-Titchaz

    Ab-Titchaz Content Manager Staff Member

    #12
    Feb 12, 2010
    Joined: Jan 30, 2008
    Messages: 14,702
    Likes Received: 15
    Trophy Points: 0
    [​IMG]

    In 1964 after an eight month trial Mandela is jailed for life for sabotage. During the trial Mandela told the court: "I do not deny that I planned sabotage. I did not plan it in a spirit of recklessness nor because I have any love of violence. I planned it as a result of a calm and sober assessment of the political situation that had arisen after many years of tyranny, exploitation and oppression of my people by the whites."
    Crowds gathered outside the court building protesting that Mandela and the others he was on trial with be freed. It was a protest that would last 27 years.​


    [​IMG]

    In 1985, as the anti-apartheid movement gained momentum, the South African government looked to difuse the situation by offering Mandela freedom. He could walk out of prison if he unconditionally gave up violence.
    He refused, here Mandela's daughter Zindzi is seen reading out his refusal.​

    [​IMG]

    Archbishop Desmond Tutu (pictured at a rally in London) was one of the leading activists campaigning for Mandela's release.

     
  13. Ab-Titchaz

    Ab-Titchaz Content Manager Staff Member

    #13
    Feb 12, 2010
    Joined: Jan 30, 2008
    Messages: 14,702
    Likes Received: 15
    Trophy Points: 0
    [​IMG]

    After years of worldwide pressure to end apartheid the South African government, led by President FW de Klerk, lifted the ban on the ANC and other liberation movements on February 2, 1990.

    Nine days later Nelson Mandela walked out of Victor Verster prison after 27 years behind bars. Walking hand-in-hand with his wife Winnie the pair raised fists in a victory salute as the world's media looked on.

    [​IMG]

    After initially refusing the role Mandela was elected as the president of the ANC in July 1991. This meant Mandela was the ANC's voice during the turbulent negotiations with the incumbent National Party about forming a new multi-racial democracy for South Africa.

    As white extremists, Zulus and ANC supporters clashed around the country, there were fears South Africa would descend into civil war. But Mandela helped to diffuse the problems and gained huge standing both domestically and on the international scene.​
     
  14. Ab-Titchaz

    Ab-Titchaz Content Manager Staff Member

    #14
    Feb 12, 2010
    Joined: Jan 30, 2008
    Messages: 14,702
    Likes Received: 15
    Trophy Points: 0
    [​IMG]

    In 1993 the Norwegian Nobel committee decided to award Mandela and FW de Klerk the Nobel Peace Prize for their work in the termination of apartheid and for laying the foundations of a new democracy in South Africa.

    It was the third time the award was presented to someone for their work against apartheid.

    In accepting the award Mandela said: "We stand here today as nothing more than a representative of the millions of our people who dared to rise up against a social system whose very essence is war, violence, racism, oppression, repression and the impoverishment of an entire people."
     
  15. Ab-Titchaz

    Ab-Titchaz Content Manager Staff Member

    #15
    Feb 12, 2010
    Joined: Jan 30, 2008
    Messages: 14,702
    Likes Received: 15
    Trophy Points: 0
    [​IMG]

    Mandela dances as he gets up on stage to deliver his victory address in downtown Johannesburg Monday May 2, 1994. He became the first black president in South Africa's history
     
  16. Ab-Titchaz

    Ab-Titchaz Content Manager Staff Member

    #16
    Feb 12, 2010
    Joined: Jan 30, 2008
    Messages: 14,702
    Likes Received: 15
    Trophy Points: 0
    [​IMG]

    Mandela soon developed an international reputation as an uncompromising, no-nonsense president, as Bill Clinton found out during his visit to South Africa in 1999.

    Clinton was taken to Robben Island and, as this picture shows, he was taken into the cell where Mandela had spent 18 years. But later Clinton made a speech in which he criticised South Africa for its friendship with the then rogue country of Libya. In his response Mandela told Clinton to go "jump in a swimming pool" adding that South Africa would be friends with whoever they wanted to.
     
  17. Ab-Titchaz

    Ab-Titchaz Content Manager Staff Member

    #17
    Feb 12, 2010
    Joined: Jan 30, 2008
    Messages: 14,702
    Likes Received: 15
    Trophy Points: 0
    [​IMG]

    In December 1997 Mandela handed over leadership of the ANC to Mbeki. Mandela had initially wanted anti-apartheid activist Cyril Ramaphosa to be his successor, but for once in his life, he lost a fight.

    Mbeki became ANC leader in 1997 and the party went to win another landslide victory in the 1999 election. This time the ANC polled 66% of the vote.​
     
  18. Ab-Titchaz

    Ab-Titchaz Content Manager Staff Member

    #18
    Feb 12, 2010
    Joined: Jan 30, 2008
    Messages: 14,702
    Likes Received: 15
    Trophy Points: 0
    [​IMG]

    During his imprisonment and immediately after his release Mandela was married to Winnie, but this marriage ended in divorce in 1995. After the divorce Mandela said that in the time he had spent with Winnie since his release from prison he has been "the loneliest man on the planet".

    A year after his divorce Mandela met Graca Machel, the widow of the former president of Mozambique. Despite saying that he would never marry again Mandela changed his mind and celebrated his 80th birthday by getting married for the third time
     
  19. Ab-Titchaz

    Ab-Titchaz Content Manager Staff Member

    #19
    Feb 12, 2010
    Joined: Jan 30, 2008
    Messages: 14,702
    Likes Received: 15
    Trophy Points: 0
    [​IMG]


    Following his retirement from politics Mandela continued to travel the world meeting world leaders and increasing his work for the charitable fund he created, the Mandela Foundation.

    One of the major aims of the foundation has been fighting against HIV and Aids. Mandela's second son Makgatho died from HIV in 2005, aged 54. The 46664 concerts helped raise money for Aids charities during the 2000s, 46664 was Mandela's prison number and the charity still works on HIV awareness and education.
     
  20. Ab-Titchaz

    Ab-Titchaz Content Manager Staff Member

    #20
    Feb 12, 2010
    Joined: Jan 30, 2008
    Messages: 14,702
    Likes Received: 15
    Trophy Points: 0
    [​IMG]

    In 2004 Mandela announced his official retirement, or what he described to journalists as his retirement from retirement. Just weeks before he made the announcement he had seen his country made host of the 2010 World Cup, the first African nation to be awarded the tournament.

    When he retired he said: "I am confident that nobody present here today will accuse me of selfishness if I ask to spend time, while I am still in good health, with my family, my friends - and also with myself.


    "My appeal therefore is: Don't call me, I will call you."
     
Loading...