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Mugabe amcharukia Odinga!

Discussion in 'International Forum' started by Askari Kanzu, Apr 28, 2011.

  1. Askari Kanzu

    Askari Kanzu JF-Expert Member

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    Mugabe achukizwa na ziara ya Raila Odinga (Ijumaa 29th April)
    AFR04_ZIMBABWE_0314_11.jpg
    By KITSEPILE NYATHI NATION Correspondent
    Posted Thursday, April 28 2011 at 22:16

    HARARE


    A visit to Zimbabwe by Prime Minister Raila Odinga on Friday has provoked vicious attacks from state media.

    The government-owned press launched attacks on Mr Odinga after he accepted an invitation to a congress for a party led by a fierce rival of President Robert Mugabe.

    Mr Odinga's office in Nairobi confirmed that he will officially open Prime Minister Morgan Tsvangirai's Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) party congress in the second city of Bulawayo on Friday.

    He will first pay a courtesy call on President Robert Mugabe of Zimbabwe at State House, Harare, before travelling to Barbourfields Stadium in Bulawayo. Mr Odinga is expected back in Kenya later in the day.

    While Mr Odinga has agreed to speak at the MDC meeting, it is not clear whether Mr Mugabe might try to keep Mr Odinga out of the country.

    However, State media propaganda against the PM's party has gone into overdrive in what analysts say is a reflection of widening cracks in Zimbabwe's coalition government.

    The state owned Herald newspaper, which usually reflects the thinking in President Mugabe's Zanu PF party, described Mr Odinga as a merchant of violence.

    "Who then is this Raila Odinga?"
    asked George Rugare Chingarande in the paper's opinion pages.

    Dictatorial streak

    "Raila Odinga is a political schizophrenic. His rhetoric oozes with (sic) refined contemporary democracy dogma but his actions reveal a very violent and dictatorial streak.

    "The exorbitant nature of this obsessive preoccupation with violence is rivalled by a few in modern day African. His proclivity for violence can be traced to his student days."

    Mr Mugabe's sympathisers have never forgiven Mr Odinga for calling for the 87 year-old leader's exit in a 2008 interview with BBC.

    In the interview, the Kenyan Prime Minister called on African leaders to push Mugabe out of power because he was a stumbling block to political reform in Zimbabwe.

    Mr Mugabe however reacted angrily, saying Mr Odinga was not welcome in Zimbabwe.

    Full story: Daily Nation
     
  2. T

    Taso JF-Expert Member

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    Mara ataenda Ikulu ya Mugabe, mara Mugabe kachukizwa...

    Magazeti ya Kiafrika.
     
  3. Wacha1

    Wacha1 JF-Expert Member

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    Kenyans cannot teach anybody democracy, though I don't like Mugabe I think he is right on this one. Kenyans always play double standard; they do things when it suits them. Remember during the struggle?
     
  4. Askari Kanzu

    Askari Kanzu JF-Expert Member

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    Baadhi ya madongo kutoka kwenye gazeti la Herald (Zimbabwe)
    [​IMG]
    Raila: The epitomy of the modern day anti-Christ


    On August 29, 2007 Raila Odinga signed a memorandum of understanding with Sheikh Abdullahi Abdi, chairman of the National Muslim Leaders Forum (NAMLEF), an umbrella organisation comprised of the nation's principal Islamic groups. The Memorandum had Odinga promising "within six months" to "rewrite the Constitution of Kenya to recognise Sharia as the only true law sanctioned by the Holy Quran for Muslim declared regions." Odinga, according to the Memorandum, would recognise "Islam as the only true religion" and give Islamic leaders an "oversight role to monitor activities of ALL other religions." This memorandum was made public by the Sheikh himself, and in an attempt at damage control and subterfuge, Raila published his own version of the memorandum which was not substantially different from the one the Sheikh had given to the media with Raila's knowledge.

    The present Kenyan constitution that was adopted in August 2010 enshrines Islamic family courts called Khadis which apply Sharia law to family disputes, and also loosely permits abortion. Odinga vigorously distinguished himself as a seminal campaigner for these provisions to be incorporated in the Kenyan supreme law, ostensibly to assuage his Muslim constituency. Christian leaders under the aegis of the Evangelical Alliance of Kenya called for rallies to campaign against these provisions. Two of these rallies were bombed by Islamic fundamentalists resulting in several casualties. By virtue of his association with the Islamic campaign, and by virtue of being the chief campaigner against the Christian values that the evangelicals stood for, Odinga is vicariously liable for the death of these innocent saints. His hands are tainted with Christian blood. He has been identified by Islamic fundamentalists as a willing and ready conduit for Islamic fundamentalism in East Africa as a prelude to it propagation to the rest of Africa.

    Odinga's terrorist connections


    Two of Odinga's most benevolent financiers in the run up to the 2007 elections were Muammar Gaddafi of Libya and A K Al Bakari, whose company A K Al Bakri & Sons Holding is based in Saudi Arabia. One of the prime contracts they would get was for the supply of jet fuel to Nairobi Airport and petroleum products to Raila's petroleum business at subsidised prices, which allowed him to undercut the competition there. This started when Raila was the minister of Energy and there were clear conflicts of interest. The deal made Raila filthy rich.

    This same Abdulkader Al Bakri is listed as a defendant in the First Amendment Complaint suit brought by various insurance companies in the United States against al Qaeda and associated organisations and individuals. Within that suit is mentioned documents (known as the Golden Chain document) picked up by Bosnian police on a raid on a charitable front organisation for al Qaeda in Sarajevo. One of the listed documents is the "Tareekh Osama" ("Osama's History") in which Abdulkader al Bakri aka Abdel Qader Bakri gets a prominent listing as a financier of Osama bin Laden. His link to terrorist fanciers is therefore well established.

    Raila, the corrupt one

    When Raila was an opposition MP during the presidency of Moi, he attempted to purchase the Kisimu Molasses Plant and failed because of lack of financial capacity. A few months later Raila joined Moi's government and was appointed Energy Minister. His portfolio had oversight of the Molasses Plant. Within months Raila structured a deal that saw him buy the plant at a grossly subsidised price. The true extent of the fraud became clear a few months later when Raila sold off just a small fraction of the business to overseas investors. The due diligence that preceded that transaction revealed that Raila's subsidised purchase of the plant prejudiced the Kenyan tax payer of more than half a million US dollars.

    In conclusion, much can be said about Raila, but there is one ineluctable conclusion. To be charitable to the man and parsimonious with adjectives, he is not the enigma that his biography purports him to be, but the archetype of prime evil overly eager to cast himself as a latter day African saint. On the eve of his arrival in Zimbabwe, he must be unmasked and exposed for who he is.

    Madongo yote yako hapa!
     
  5. AshaDii

    AshaDii Platinum Member

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    Odinga really has the guts, what makes him so confident of himself? Him going to officially open Prime Minister Morgan Tsvangirai's Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) party congress in the second city of Bulawayo in a country whose leader in not in good terms with; As much as he is paying a courtesy call on President Robert Mugabe at the State House it looks like an insult to Mugabe. Is Odinga even sure the state house doors will be open to him let alone the boarder?
     
  6. Askari Kanzu

    Askari Kanzu JF-Expert Member

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    Siasa hazitabiriki. Mugabe amempokea Raila kwa mikono miwili!

    Raila, Mugabe Hold Talks
    29 April 2011

    Nairobi - Prime Minister Raila Odinga has held talks with Zimbabwe President Mr Robert Mugabe in Harare.

    Mr Odinga arrived in the Zimbabwe capital Friday on his way to the city of Bulawayo, where he is to open the third National Conference of the Movement for Democratic Change.

    He arrived at State House, Harare for a courtesy call on President Mugabe shortly before 1pm Kenya time, accompanied by four Members of Parliament and one Orange Democratic Movement Secretariat official.

    President Mugabe warmly welcomed Mr Odinga at State House where they held talks that ran for more than an hour.

    Talks between the two leaders focused on the similarities in the history of Kenya and Zimbabwe, the struggle for the liberation of Africa, the continent's place in world politics, reforms in the two countries and global affairs, touching on international trade and events in North Africa and the Middle East.

    During the talks, Mr Odinga conveyed greetings from President Kibaki to President Mugabe.

    President Mugabe showed strong interest in political developments in Kenya, particularly the unveiling of the new constitution and said Zimbabwe looked up to Kenya for a model in reforming the constitution.

    He said Zimbabwe has always learnt from Kenya, from the liberation struggle to date, adding that he spent years studying the history of the Mau Mau war for independence.

    President Mugabe invited Mr Odinga to extend his stay in the country
    .

    Mr Odinga said Kenya and Zimbabwe have links imposed by history and should work together towards reforms.

    The PM promised that Kenya would donate a book on constitution-making process to Zimbabwe to guide the Southern African nation in its own quest for constitutional reforms.

    Mr Odinga said the Kenyan process was extremely consultative and open and the country would be keen to share its experience with the people of Zimbabwe.

    The Prime Minister left Harare shortly after 2 pm Kenya time and is currently in Bulawayo for the MDC Congress.

    -AllAfrica.com
     
  7. Ab-Titchaz

    Ab-Titchaz Content Manager Staff Member

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    [​IMG]


    Zimbabwes Prime Minster and Movement for Democratic Change President, Morgan Tsvangirai, left is seen with Kenyan Prime Minister Raila Odinga, guest of honour at the third MDC annual Congress been held in Bulawayo about 400 km South of Harare, Friday, April, 29, 2011. Odinga called on the MDC to unite and adopt a good constitution before elections are held in the country.

    [​IMG]



     
  8. Ab-Titchaz

    Ab-Titchaz Content Manager Staff Member

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    Full Speech by Kenya Prime Minister Raila Odinga at the Third National Congress of The MDC

    Friday, 29 April 2011

    THE Right Honorable Morgan Tsvangirai, Prime Minister of the Republic of Zimbabwe and President of the Movement for Democratic Change; Party officials, distinguished delegates, Let me begin by congratulating my friend Morgan on his re-election last week as president of this great party. On behalf of my own party, the Orange Democratic Movement, I salute both you and your party supporters for the confidence shown in your leadership.

    I congratulate those elected to other leadership positions. Their mandate means assuming major national responsibilities. The first of these is to unite the party. The second is to unite the people of Zimbabwe in a single vision of universal prosperity.

    Ladies and gentlemen, Zimbabwe and Kenya have experienced very similar histories since independence – of heroic peoples struggling for liberation from oppression and repression. Many Zimbabweans, like many Kenyans, have paid the ultimate price for a future worth having, dying in order that the nation might live. We share heartfelt grief and respect for their sacrifice.

    We have other similarities and links. Several Kenyan leaders were educated here. When Zimbabwe gained independence, a number of Kenyans helped in establishing its key institutions and government structures.

    It is this kind of bond that makes us partners in democracy and in moving our continent forward. Our respective liberation wars have shown how a downtrodden people can rise up and demand respect. That spirit lives in your party. It must radiate across the nation. But what, ladies and gentlemen, has happened to the Africa whose liberation our struggles typified? As we look round, we see, to our dismay, nothing but contradictions and paradoxes.

    Africa, with its 51 independent states and 52nd about to be born, is a continent of great cultural diversity. It is rich in natural resources – minerals, freshwater lakes, rivers and forests. But it is also the poorest of the continents, with the highest child mortality rates and levels of inequality and the lowest human development indices. Some blame colonial rule, others the faulty domestic policies pursued by African leaders.

    This blame game is taking us nowhere. I have spent my entire adult life somewhere on the political spectrum – as an observer, an activist, a three-time detainee, a member of parliament, a cabinet minister and now prime minister of my country. I have had much time for analysis and reflection. Of course colonialism messed up Africa, arbitrarily dividing our people, sapping their confidence and pride and exploiting our resources! Of course many African leaders have performed dismally!

    But 40 or 50 years since many African nations attained independence, we cannot continue blaming the colonialists for our problems. Since the 1990s, a clear consensus has emerged both within and outside Africa that the problems the continent faces have to do with the way it is governed today.

    This has led to human rights abuses, the breakdown of the rule of law, the over-centralisation of power, particularly as vested in imperial presidencies, and the accompanying cultures of corruption and impunity.

    Powerful leaders and their close associates have done as they wished, in the knowledge that nothing would happen to them. Lack of accountability and transparency has fostered official corruption and the plundering of resources meant for development. It is these insidious developments – and not the colonial legacy – that have brought this continent to the brink of ruination, and its people to the desperate situation in which so many millions find themselves today.

    But I speak to you as an Afro-optimist and a true believer in pan-Africanism, one who looks forward to the day Africa will be united in its irreversible democratic ideals and sound socio-economic policies. And on this occasion of the MDC's National Convention, I would like to share with you my thoughts on two issues that I strongly believe can help us turn the tide.

    The first is that Africa must embrace the culture of constitutionalism. It must invest in the building of institutions that promote and compel sound leadership.

    That a constitution is indispensable in a modern society is underlined by the fact that the struggle for the second liberation in Africa, which began in the early 1980s, has centred on demand for the enactment of new constitutions. That was our aim in Kenya and it is no less true of Zimbabwe.

    We have seen that the mere re-introduction of multi-party politics in Africa, after decades of single-party and military dictatorships, has not solved the governance problem. We have seen that multi-party elections alone will not propel us from institutionalised authoritarian systems to more democratic modes of governance.

    Not that constitutions of themselves are inviolable. We have not been without constitutions. We have had them, but they have been repeatedly amended at the whim of the ruling elite, and have sustained and entrenched powerful presidents whose word has been law, and who have used their power not for the nation's benefit but for their own enrichment. Where such leaders have refused to give way through the ballot – and let's face it, that is, most of them – military dictatorships have sometimes ensued, and these have fared no better.

    In short, political power in Africa has often meant gain and riches for the ruling class and more poverty, deprivation and powerlessness for the ordinary person.

    We had hoped that new constitutions – new beginnings by the leaders of the Second Liberation, mandated by a better-educated electorate that increasingly knows what it wants and has no qualms about asking for it – would instill in leaders new respect for the laws that govern their lands.

    One of the great disappointments of the Second Liberation has been that many of the new liberators changed their tune once they got into power. They began to manipulate constitutions to prolong their rule, and coerced their parties into securing support for additional terms or eliminating opponents. Institutionalised corruption, instead of receding, loomed larger than ever.

    That brings me to the second problem. Africa has truly been left wanting when it comes to visionary leadership, the kind of leadership that is undistracted in its quest for solid institutions committed to constitutionalism, equity and impartiality. We have failed to elect leaders dedicated to ignoring tribe, religion, region and race in the management of public affairs.

    One-party rule might have withered and died with the introduction of political pluralism in the 1990s but its ugly monolithic vestiges linger. In particular, our ballots have yet to be free and fair. A long list of African leaders with questionable democratic credentials has used the pretension of promoting state unity as an excuse for excess, intolerance, repression, and illegal tenure of office.

    This looks more dangerous than our previous situation. What could be worse than the electorate choosing how and by whom they should be governed, only for their verdict to be ignored? When leaders and governments lack popular support, democracy and good governance cannot be expected, and nations cannot move forward.

    This is the tragedy that afflicts Africa today.

    Ladies and gentlemen, Zimbabwe must move quickly to resolve its democratic challenges, so that it can take its rightful place as a potential centre for economic growth in this part of the continent. All parties, and particularly the MDC, which will be a critical player, need to invest in building institutions of democracy.

    Party policy, and its wholehearted approval by party members, will be one of the keys to success. And no one must ever forget that good resolutions and declarations are fine in themselves but they are not tantamount to victory. That will only come when party structures and processes are people-driven, genuine and devoid of corruption, and provide a clear process for seeking the people's mandate.

    Your party must be not only the maker but also the keeper of the promise. Ladies and gentlemen, finally, as the leader of a party that is, like yours, in a coalition government, I would urge you, as you prepare for the next elections, not to lose sight of the fact that you are in government, and you have government policies to pursue and to deliver.

    You will have to dig deep into your reservoirs of tolerance and compromise to ensure that this happens, for the alternative would serve neither the MDC nor its partner in government. It would only cripple the nation.

    I know it is not easy. But we in Kenya, having reaped a harvest of chaos and death after our disputed 2007 elections, have managed to make useful strides forward. Our Grand Coalition government promulgated a new Constitution last year and is in the process of enacting every part of it. It has not always been an easy alliance, but the spirit of give and take has so far allowed us to make it work.

    I commend it to you.

    Thank you very much for allowing me this opportunity to share a few thoughts with you here today.


    The Hon Raila A Odinga EGH MP
    Prime Minister of the Republic of Kenya


     
  9. Kiranga

    Kiranga JF-Expert Member

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    The irony here is that Mr. Mugabe's mouthpiece has the nerve to criticize Mr. Odinga over violence, while their patron Mr. Mugabe declared openly and unequivocally that he has "a degree in violence"
     
  10. Askari Kanzu

    Askari Kanzu JF-Expert Member

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    After reading Odinga's speech I now seem to understand why Mugabe 'warmly welcomed Mr. Odinga' and 'invited Mr. Odinga to extend his stay in the country'!
     
  11. Ab-Titchaz

    Ab-Titchaz Content Manager Staff Member

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    [​IMG]

    Zimbabwe President Robert Mugabe welcomes Kenya Prime Minister Raila Odinga at State House, Harare April 29, 2011.



    [​IMG]



    [​IMG]



    [​IMG]
     
  12. boma2000

    boma2000 JF-Expert Member

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    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    mambo ya siasa na wanasiasa, ndiyo maana husema 'in politics there is no permanent friend and no permanent enemy
     
  13. AshaDii

    AshaDii Platinum Member

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    Wanasiasa wanachezea akili zetu hawa! But at least from his speech I get why Mugabe alilainika.
     
  14. Askari Kanzu

    Askari Kanzu JF-Expert Member

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    Nadhani hata hiyo speech ya Odinga ilipitiwa na kuidhinishwa kwanza na Mugabe mwenyewe.
     
  15. AshaDii

    AshaDii Platinum Member

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    Nami pia nimefikiria hivyo, na tukiangalia mlolongo wa events its the most logical explanation.... Na pia am impressed na Odinga ni dhahiri kua ni fundi wa playing both sides silimutaneously.
     
  16. Askari Kanzu

    Askari Kanzu JF-Expert Member

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    Labda ndio sababu ameweza kukubaliana na Kibaki!
     
  17. AshaDii

    AshaDii Platinum Member

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    Possible, maana at the end ot the day he still gets what he wants... kaona si mbaya
     
  18. boma2000

    boma2000 JF-Expert Member

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    Hapana hiyo haiwezekani, ila Odinga ni mjanja na anajua kuchanga karata zake za kisiasa
     
  19. Askari Kanzu

    Askari Kanzu JF-Expert Member

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    Sidhani kama Odinga anamzidi ujanja Mugabe. Mugabe ni gwiji wa haya mambo, hawezi kumwachia Odinga aingie kwenye himaya yake (Zim) na kuropoka vitu asivyokubaliana navyo!
     
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