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Millions paid in bribes for Qatar's 2022 World Cup votes, report claims

Discussion in 'Sports' started by Rutashubanyuma, May 11, 2011.

  1. Rutashubanyuma

    Rutashubanyuma JF-Expert Member

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    Millions paid in bribes for Qatar's 2022 World Cup votes, report claims

    • Financial deals allegedly arranged in exchange for votes
    • Qatar strongly denies claims as 'entirely false'




    • Matt Scott
    • guardian.co.uk, Tuesday 10 May 2011 21.30 BST <li class="history">Article history [​IMG] Qatar has denied allegations that it paid for World Cup votes. Photograph: Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images

      Qatar's controversial success in taking the 2022 World Cup to the desert was propelled by millions of dollars in bribes, according to previously unpublished conversations key figures connected with Fifa held with undercover reporters.
      In evidence published on Tuesday under parliamentary privilege by the select committee on football governance, the Sunday Times alleges that Michel Zen-Ruffinen, a former secretary general of Fifa, introduced the reporters to a certain Amadou Diallo. Zen-Ruffinen is said to have claimed that Qatar was "using Diallo to arrange financial deals with the African [Fifa executive committee] members in exchange for World Cup votes".
      Diallo is said to have been a senior staff member in the entourage of Issa Hayatou, the Confederation of African Football's president. Ismail Bhamjee, himself a former member of the Fifa executive committee, was allegedly more explicit in his dialogue with the undercover reporters.
      According to the letter sent by the Sunday Times to John Whittingdale, the chairman of the select committee inquiry into football governance, Bhamjee explained that some of Africa's current and former representatives on the Fifa executive committee had previously sold their votes. "Bhamjee said … Issa Hayatou of Cameroon, Slim Aloulou of Tunisia and Amadou Diakite of the Ivory Coast had each been paid for their votes by Morocco when it was bidding against South Africa in the contest for the 2010 World Cup."
      Bhamjee is directly quoted in the letter as saying: "I'm told the Africans will get … anything from a quarter to half a million dollars," in reference to alleged payments from the Qatar bid to African executive committee members. Asked to clarify whether that money was to invest in football or for them personally, Bhamjee reportedly replied: "No, no, no, no. This is on top. This is separate from the football."
      Damian Collins, a Conservative MP on the select committee, put these allegations to Mike Lee, a strategic communications consultant to the Qatar 2022 bid who was appearing as a witness. Lee responded: "I was working at the highest level of that bid and talking at length with the chairman and CEO and saw no evidence of any of these allegations.
      "My experience is I would have had a sense if such things were going on and I had no sense of that."
      On Tuesday night the Qatar Football Association issued a statement in which they said they "categorically deny" the allegations. "As the Sunday Times itself states, these accusations 'were and remain unproven'. They will remain unproven, because they are false," it said.
      Specifically the Sunday Times claims that Diakite, the former Fifa executive committee member who remained intimately involved in the Fifa machine, talked about $1m (£611,000) to $1.2m payments for "projects by Qatar in return for their 2022 vote".
      The newspaper says it highlighted these several allegations to Fifa in its own submission to the governing body. It comments: "Fifa does not appear to have pursued any of these matters."
      A London law firm hired by the Qatar bid has strongly denied the allegations, calling them "entirely false". However the Sunday Times's letter said that it had separately spoken to "a whistleblower who had worked with the Qatar bid". That individual is said further to have claimed that Hayatou and his fellow executive committee member from the Ivory Coast, Jacques Anouma, had received $1.5m from Qatar "to secure their votes".
      It added: "The cash was to go to the three members' football federations but there would be no questions asked about how the money was used." It quoted the whistleblower as saying: "Basically if they took it into their pocket we don't give a jack."

     
  2. Baba_Enock

    Baba_Enock JF-Expert Member

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    Kwa African's $250,000 - $500,000 : hata angekuwa Kikwete angekubali!

    "Nawe usipokee rushwa, kwani hiyo rushwa huwapofusha macho hao waonao, na kuyapotoa maneno yao wenye haki"


    Kutoka 23:08
     
  3. Rutashubanyuma

    Rutashubanyuma JF-Expert Member

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    Fifa executives accused by former FA chairman Triesman of seeking bribes

    Sepp Blatter 'shocked' over allegations as separate claims emerge that Fifa members accepted money from Qatar bid



    • Owen Gibson, sports news correspondent
    • guardian.co.uk, Tuesday 10 May 2011 19.22 BST <li class="history">Article history [​IMG] FA Chairman Lord Triesman during the England 2018 World Cup bid. Photograph: Christopher Lee/Getty Images

      Lord Triesman, the former chairman of the FA, has reignited the row over allegations of corruption at the heart of football's governing body by accusing four leading members of Fifa of seeking bribes to back England's bid for the 2018 World Cup.
      Triesman told a parliamentary committee that the members of Fifa's executive committee were guilty of "improper and unethical behaviour" in the early stages of the bid.
      Triesman, the former chairman of England's 2018 bid, accused Concacaf president Jack Warner of asking for £2.5m to build a school and offices in Trinidad at a meeting in a London hotel in October 2009, intimating that the money should be paid directly through him.
      Warner later requested £500,000 for a scheme to buy up World Cup TV rights and air the tournament on big screens for the islanders of Haiti in the wake of the 2010 earthquake, claimed Triesman. Again, he was told the money should be routed through him.
      "[Warner] believed that if he had the sum of half a million pounds sent to him he could secure those rights. I told him it was out of the question. Some time later it was put to me that he was actually the owner of those rights," said Triesman.
      Warner said the allegations made against him by Triesman were "a piece of nonsense". "I've never asked Triesman nor any other person, Englishman or otherwise, for any money for my vote at any time," he said.
      Triesman, who was forced to stand down last May as the result of a newspaper sting, said that at another meeting, with Paraguayan Fifa executive Nicolas Leoz in Ascunción, it was suggested that he secure him a knighthood in return for his vote. Triesman said he was guided to a display cabinet in which there were copies of honours he had received and photos of streets named after him. Through a translator, Leoz, the head of South American football, is said by Triesman to have told him he did not want for cash, but a knighthood "would be appropriate".
      Later, Triesman said he met the longstanding head of the Brazilian football federation, Ricardo Teixeira, in Qatar. Speaking after Brazil had beaten England in a friendly, when Triesman said he was looking forward to meeting President Lula, he was told: "Lula is nothing. You come and tell me what you have for me."
      Teixeira and Leoz were both accused by a BBC Panorama documentary broadcast on the eve of the World Cup vote of being among those implicated in taking bribes from a sports marketing firm in the 90s.
      Triesman claimed a fourth approach was made during negotiations about England playing a friendly against Thailand with Fifa Exco member Worawi Makudi. Triesman said that he insisted on acquiring the TV rights to the mooted game. "That was what he believed was the critical thing to making the arrangement a success."
      New evidence submitted to the committee by the Sunday Times from a whistleblower within Qatar's successful campaign for the 2022 World Cup alleged two other Fifa executive committee members, Issa Hayatou of Cameroon and Jacques Anouma of the Ivory Coast, had accepted payments of $1.5m in return for their vote. The claims mean a third of Fifa's 24 executive committee members have now been accused of impropriety in the run up to last year's World Cup vote.
      The Qatar Football Association last night said they "categorically deny" the Sunday Times allegations. "As the Sunday Times itself states, these accusations 'were and remain' unproven. They will remain unproven, because they are false."
      Triesman said he had waited until his appearance at the culture, media and sport committee to make the allegations so that he could do so under parliamentary privilege. He admitted he should have complained to Fifa at the time, but did not do so for fear of harming the bid.
      The Fifa president Sepp Blatter claimed he was "shocked" by the claims. "If this is true, I will fight this. I am fighting for Fifa to clean Fifa. I cannot answer for individual members of our committee. I cannot say if they are all angels or if they are all devils," Blatter said.
      England's £18m campaign garnered just two votes at the vote in Zurich last year. Triesman accepted there were failings with the campaign, but said Fifa's rationale to take it to new territories &#8211; and the pervading suspicion of corruption surrounding the bidding process &#8211; may have meant the prize was unwinnable.
      Two other Fifa executive committee members, Oceania's Reynald Temarii and the Nigerian Amos Adamu, and four other officials, were suspended last year in the wake of corruption allegations.

     
  4. Rutashubanyuma

    Rutashubanyuma JF-Expert Member

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    Fifa executives accused by former FA chairman Triesman of seeking bribes

    Sepp Blatter 'shocked' over allegations as separate claims emerge that Fifa members accepted money from Qatar bid



    • Owen Gibson, sports news correspondent
    • guardian.co.uk, Tuesday 10 May 2011 19.22 BST <li class="history">Article history [​IMG] FA Chairman Lord Triesman during the England 2018 World Cup bid. Photograph: Christopher Lee/Getty Images

      Lord Triesman, the former chairman of the FA, has reignited the row over allegations of corruption at the heart of football's governing body by accusing four leading members of Fifa of seeking bribes to back England's bid for the 2018 World Cup.
      Triesman told a parliamentary committee that the members of Fifa's executive committee were guilty of "improper and unethical behaviour" in the early stages of the bid.
      Triesman, the former chairman of England's 2018 bid, accused Concacaf president Jack Warner of asking for £2.5m to build a school and offices in Trinidad at a meeting in a London hotel in October 2009, intimating that the money should be paid directly through him.
      Warner later requested £500,000 for a scheme to buy up World Cup TV rights and air the tournament on big screens for the islanders of Haiti in the wake of the 2010 earthquake, claimed Triesman. Again, he was told the money should be routed through him.
      "[Warner] believed that if he had the sum of half a million pounds sent to him he could secure those rights. I told him it was out of the question. Some time later it was put to me that he was actually the owner of those rights," said Triesman.
      Warner said the allegations made against him by Triesman were "a piece of nonsense". "I've never asked Triesman nor any other person, Englishman or otherwise, for any money for my vote at any time," he said.
      Triesman, who was forced to stand down last May as the result of a newspaper sting, said that at another meeting, with Paraguayan Fifa executive Nicolas Leoz in Ascunción, it was suggested that he secure him a knighthood in return for his vote. Triesman said he was guided to a display cabinet in which there were copies of honours he had received and photos of streets named after him. Through a translator, Leoz, the head of South American football, is said by Triesman to have told him he did not want for cash, but a knighthood "would be appropriate".
      Later, Triesman said he met the longstanding head of the Brazilian football federation, Ricardo Teixeira, in Qatar. Speaking after Brazil had beaten England in a friendly, when Triesman said he was looking forward to meeting President Lula, he was told: "Lula is nothing. You come and tell me what you have for me."
      Teixeira and Leoz were both accused by a BBC Panorama documentary broadcast on the eve of the World Cup vote of being among those implicated in taking bribes from a sports marketing firm in the 90s.
      Triesman claimed a fourth approach was made during negotiations about England playing a friendly against Thailand with Fifa Exco member Worawi Makudi. Triesman said that he insisted on acquiring the TV rights to the mooted game. "That was what he believed was the critical thing to making the arrangement a success."
      New evidence submitted to the committee by the Sunday Times from a whistleblower within Qatar's successful campaign for the 2022 World Cup alleged two other Fifa executive committee members, Issa Hayatou of Cameroon and Jacques Anouma of the Ivory Coast, had accepted payments of $1.5m in return for their vote. The claims mean a third of Fifa's 24 executive committee members have now been accused of impropriety in the run up to last year's World Cup vote.
      The Qatar Football Association last night said they "categorically deny" the Sunday Times allegations. "As the Sunday Times itself states, these accusations 'were and remain' unproven. They will remain unproven, because they are false."
      Triesman said he had waited until his appearance at the culture, media and sport committee to make the allegations so that he could do so under parliamentary privilege. He admitted he should have complained to Fifa at the time, but did not do so for fear of harming the bid.
      The Fifa president Sepp Blatter claimed he was "shocked" by the claims. "If this is true, I will fight this. I am fighting for Fifa to clean Fifa. I cannot answer for individual members of our committee. I cannot say if they are all angels or if they are all devils," Blatter said.
      England's £18m campaign garnered just two votes at the vote in Zurich last year. Triesman accepted there were failings with the campaign, but said Fifa's rationale to take it to new territories – and the pervading suspicion of corruption surrounding the bidding process – may have meant the prize was unwinnable.
      Two other Fifa executive committee members, Oceania's Reynald Temarii and the Nigerian Amos Adamu, and four other officials, were suspended last year in the wake of corruption allegations.
     
  5. Rutashubanyuma

    Rutashubanyuma JF-Expert Member

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    Triesman: Premier League wanted Game 39 in return for backing 2018 bid

    &#8226; Former FA chairman reopens row with Richard Scudamore
    &#8226; Brown announced 2018 bid without telling FA




    • Owen Gibson
    • guardian.co.uk, Tuesday 10 May 2011 20.15 BST <li class="history">Article history [​IMG] Lord Triesman alleges the Premier League was not prepared to back the FA's 2018 World Cup bid unconditionally. Photograph: Paul Childs/Action Images

      Lord Triesman, the former Football Association chairman who led the 2018 World Cup bid until May last year, has renewed hostilities with Richard Scudamore after claiming the Premier League chief executive made FA support for the doomed "Game 39" proposal a condition of his backing the bid.
      Amid a series of explosive allegations about bribes sought by Fifa executive committee members, Triesman said Scudamore issued an ultimatum of his own. He said he was told the league would only back the bid if Triesman dropped his opposition to the controversial idea of playing an extra round of Premier League matches overseas. The proposal was eventually shelved after a storm of protest from football fans and the game's governing bodies.
      Appearing before a parliamentary select committee, Triesman also admitted the bid had a number of key failings but said the taint of corruption and the apparent desire by Fifa to take the World Cup to new territories may have made it unwinnable in any case.
      Triesman said the well-documented internal difficulties within the bid during its formative stages were partly caused by friction with the Premier League, exemplified by the ultimatum from Scudamore.
      "It took a long time to get the Premier League on board. The point was made to me very early on that if I'd concede the 39th game was a good idea they'd come on board immediately. That was put to me directly by Scudamore. But my view of the 39th game was my view of the 39th game."
      Premier League insiders insist the dates don't add up and say early concerns were around Triesman's approach, the overly political make-up of the board and the omission from it of Sir Dave Richards, the Premier League chairman.
      Scudamore, who also fell out with Triesman over his public warning about the Premier League's unsustainable levels of debt, said: "I am afraid David's recollection of the facts and the chronology is simply wrong in this instance."
      He added: "I was, along with my organisation and our member clubs, always in full support of England's bid for the Fifa 2018 World Cup. It was discussed at numerous club meetings and that support was never made conditional on the International Round concept, or anything else for that matter."
      Triesman said the later resignation of Richards, who was eventually added to the board but quit in a fit of pique in November 2009, made a "shaky machine" even more precarious.
      "Sir Dave did come on board and he did take part in a good deal of the international travel. I appreciated that and thank him for it, but the point at which he decided to resign he was shaking a rather shaky machine to a greater extent."
      Triesman, forced to resign himself over a May 2010 newspaper sting that is still the subject of an investigation by the Press Complaints Commission, said the FA had been bounced into bidding by the then prime minister Gordon Brown. "He [Brown] did not give an ultimatum &#8211; he announced it before the FA board had considered it," the peer said.
      Mike Lee, the PR executive who helped win the 2012 Olympics for London and the 2016 Games for Rio de Janeiro, as well as helping Qatar to victory in the 2022 World Cup race, said the FA made a series of mistakes. They included having a bid chairman who was also FA chairman, not having an arms-length bid company, appearing arrogant and failing to establish a coherent message. "It was never clear what the overall strategy or compelling message of what England could offer football was," Lee said.
      But Triesman said Fifa's president, Sepp Blatter, had told him early on that it was essential that the FA leader also led the bid and that he did so reluctantly.

     
  6. The Finest

    The Finest JF-Expert Member

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    Waingereza hawajachoka tu bado
     
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