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Martin Luther King Jr. Greatest speech

Discussion in 'Jukwaa la Siasa' started by bagamoyo, Jan 18, 2010.

  1. b

    bagamoyo JF-Expert Member

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    Delivered on the steps at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington D.C. on August 28, 1963

    I am happy to join with you today in what will go down in history as the greatest demonstration for freedom in the history of our nation.

    Five score years ago, a great American, in whose symbolic shadow we stand today, signed the Emancipation Proclamation. This momentous decree came as a great beacon light of hope to millions of Negro slaves who had been seared in the flames of withering injustice. It came as a joyous daybreak to end the long night of their captivity.

    But one hundred years later, the Negro still is not free. One hundred years later, the life of the Negro is still sadly crippled by the manacles of segregation and the chains of discrimination. One hundred years later, the Negro lives on a lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of material prosperity. One hundred years later, the Negro is still languished in the corners of American society and finds himself an exile in his own land. And so we've come here today to dramatize a shameful condition.

    In a sense we've come to our nation's capital to cash a check. When the architects of our republic wrote the magnificent words of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence, they were signing a promissory note to which every American was to fall heir. This note was a promise that all men, yes, black men as well as white men, would be guaranteed the "unalienable Rights" of "Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness." It is obvious today that America has defaulted on this promissory note, insofar as her citizens of color are concerned. Instead of honoring this sacred obligation, America has given the Negro people a bad check, a check which has come back marked "insufficient funds."

    But we refuse to believe that the bank of justice is bankrupt. We refuse to believe that there are insufficient funds in the great vaults of opportunity of this nation. And so, we've come to cash this check, a check that will give us upon demand the riches of freedom and the security of justice.

    We have also come to this hallowed spot to remind America of the fierce urgency of Now. This is no time to engage in the luxury of cooling off or to take the tranquilizing drug of gradualism. Now is the time to make real the promises of democracy. Now is the time to rise from the dark and desolate valley of segregation to the sunlit path of racial justice. Now is the time to lift our nation from the quicksands of racial injustice to the solid rock of brotherhood. Now is the time to make justice a reality for all of God's children.

    It would be fatal for the nation to overlook the urgency of the moment. This sweltering summer of the Negro's legitimate discontent will not pass until there is an invigorating autumn of freedom and equality. Nineteen sixty-three is not an end, but a beginning. And those who hope that the Negro needed to blow off steam and will now be content will have a rude awakening if the nation returns to business as usual. And there will be neither rest nor tranquility in America until the Negro is granted his citizenship rights. The whirlwinds of revolt will continue to shake the foundations of our nation until the bright day of justice emerges.

    But there is something that I must say to my people, who stand on the warm threshold which leads into the palace of justice: In the process of gaining our rightful place, we must not be guilty of wrongful deeds. Let us not seek to satisfy our thirst for freedom by drinking from the cup of bitterness and hatred. We must forever conduct our struggle on the high plane of dignity and discipline. We must not allow our creative protest to degenerate into physical violence. Again and again, we must rise to the majestic heights of meeting physical force with soul force.

    The marvelous new militancy which has engulfed the Negro community must not lead us to a distrust of all white people, for many of our white brothers, as evidenced by their presence here today, have come to realize that their destiny is tied up with our destiny. And they have come to realize that their freedom is inextricably bound to our freedom.
    We cannot walk alone.

    And as we walk, we must make the pledge that we shall always march ahead.

    We cannot turn back.

    There are those who are asking the devotees of civil rights, "When will you be satisfied?" We can never be satisfied as long as the Negro is the victim of the unspeakable horrors of police brutality. We can never be satisfied as long as our bodies, heavy with the fatigue of travel, cannot gain lodging in the motels of the highways and the hotels of the cities. We cannot be satisfied as long as the negro's basic mobility is from a smaller ghetto to a larger one. We can never be satisfied as long as our children are stripped of their self-hood and robbed of their dignity by signs stating: "For Whites Only." We cannot be satisfied as long as a Negro in Mississippi cannot vote and a Negro in New York believes he has nothing for which to vote. No, no, we are not satisfied, and we will not be satisfied until "justice rolls down like waters, and righteousness like a mighty stream."

    I am not unmindful that some of you have come here out of great trials and tribulations. Some of you have come fresh from narrow jail cells. And some of you have come from areas where your quest -- quest for freedom left you battered by the storms of persecution and staggered by the winds of police brutality. You have been the veterans of creative suffering. Continue to work with the faith that unearned suffering is redemptive. Go back to Mississippi, go back to Alabama, go back to South Carolina, go back to Georgia, go back to Louisiana, go back to the slums and ghettos of our northern cities, knowing that somehow this situation can and will be changed.

    Let us not wallow in the valley of despair, I say to you today, my friends.

    And so even though we face the difficulties of today and tomorrow, I still have a dream. It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream.

    I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: "We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal.
    I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia, the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood.
    I have a dream that one day even the state of Mississippi, a state sweltering with the heat of injustice, sweltering with the heat of oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice.
    I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.
    I have a dream today!
    I have a dream that one day, down in Alabama, with its vicious racists, with its governor having his lips dripping with the words of "interposition" and "nullification" -- one day right there in Alabama little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers.
    I have a dream today!
    I have a dream that one day every valley shall be exalted, and every hill and mountain shall be made low, the rough places will be made plain, and the crooked places will be made straight; "and the glory of the Lord shall be revealed and all flesh shall see it together."

    This is our hope, and this is the faith that I go back to the South with.

    With this faith, we will be able to hew out of the mountain of despair a stone of hope. With this faith, we will be able to transform the jangling discords of our nation into a beautiful symphony of brotherhood. With this faith, we will be able to work together, to pray together, to struggle together, to go to jail together, to stand up for freedom together, knowing that we will be free one day.

    And this will be the day -- this will be the day when all of God's children will be able to sing with new meaning:
    My country 'tis of thee, sweet land of liberty, of thee I sing.
    Land where my fathers died, land of the Pilgrim's pride,
    From every mountainside, let freedom ring!
    And if America is to be a great nation, this must become true.
    And so let freedom ring from the prodigious hilltops of New Hampshire.
    Let freedom ring from the mighty mountains of New York.
    Let freedom ring from the heightening Alleghenies of Pennsylvania.
    Let freedom ring from the snow-capped Rockies of Colorado.
    Let freedom ring from the curvaceous slopes of California.
    But not only that:
    Let freedom ring from Stone Mountain of Georgia.
    Let freedom ring from Lookout Mountain of Tennessee.
    Let freedom ring from every hill and molehill of Mississippi.
    From every mountainside, let freedom ring.


    And when this happens, when we allow freedom ring, when we let it ring from every village and every hamlet, from every state and every city, we will be able to speed up that day when all of God's children, black men and white men, Jews and Gentiles, Protestants and Catholics, will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro spiritual:
    Free at last! Free at last!

    Thank God Almighty, we are free at last!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 4, 2016
  2. Kibunago

    Kibunago JF-Expert Member

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    MLK, guarded by a man in a white barghashia!

    Every minute when I listen & watch the video clip, my blood pressure becomes erratic! Probably one day I shall be honouring my father with a voice of liberation in peace to a multitude.
     
  3. ELNIN0

    ELNIN0 JF-Expert Member

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  4. ELNIN0

    ELNIN0 JF-Expert Member

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    Hawa ndiyo watu wa Maono - Nikifika hapa nywele huwa zinanisisimka -

    "True revolutionary is guided by great feelings of love.""
     
  5. Waberoya

    Waberoya JF-Expert Member

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    you are not alone guys! you can simply see how leaders love their people, consequently people love each other and their nation!

    American are proud of their country because of their forefathers who loved them to death!
     
  6. Waberoya

    Waberoya JF-Expert Member

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    Some of his quotes

    "The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy."



    "Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter"



    ''Every man must decide whether he will walk in the light of creative altruism or in the darkness of destructive selfishness''


    ''An individual has not started living until he can rise above the narrow confines of his individualistic concerns to the broader concerns of all humanity.''


    "The hottest place in Hell is reserved for those who remain neutral in times of great moral conflict."


    The time is always right to do what is right.


     
  7. Masaki

    Masaki JF-Expert Member

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    This is one of greatest speeches in the history of mankind!
     
  8. Masaki

    Masaki JF-Expert Member

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    [FONT=Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]''If there is anyone out there who still doubts that America is a place where all things are possible; who still wonders if the dream of our founders is alive in our time; who still questions the power of our democracy, tonight is your answer'' - Barack Obama in his Election Night Victory Speech
    Grant Park, Illinois
    November 4, 2008

    [/FONT]
     
  9. b

    bagamoyo JF-Expert Member

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    Waberoya,
    Nice stuff from the horse's mouth, hope we Tanzanians won't remain silent otherwise we are presumed dead.
     
  10. MziziMkavu

    MziziMkavu JF-Expert Member

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  11. MziziMkavu

    MziziMkavu JF-Expert Member

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  12. Mama Mdogo

    Mama Mdogo JF-Expert Member

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    Martin Luther King Jr day is celebrated on 17 January of every year, and in 2013 it will be celebrated when he would have turned 84 years old. It's a great day to revisit the "I Have A Dream" speech he delivered on August 28, 1963 in Washington, D.C.


    "I Have a Dream" is a 17-minute public speech by Martin Luther King, Jr in which he called for an end to racism in the United States. The speech, delivered to over 200,000 civil rights supporters from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial during the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, was a defining moment of the American Civil Rights Movement.

    King begins his speech by invoking the Emancipation Proclamation, which freed millions of slaves in 1863, but says that "one hundred years later, the Negro still is not free." At the end of the speech, King departed from his prepared text for a partly improvised peroration on the theme of "I have a dream", possibly prompted by Mahalia Jackson's cry, "Tell them about the dream, Martin!" In this part of the speech, which most excited the crowd and has now become the most famous, King described dreams of freedom and equality arising from a land of slavery and hatred. The speech was ranked the top American speech of the 20th century by a 1999 poll of scholars of public address.


    Source: I Have a Dream - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia



    View attachment I have a dream speech.pdf
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 4, 2016
  13. Sheghwede

    Sheghwede JF-Expert Member

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    Delivered on the steps at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington D.C. on August 28, 1963


    I am happy to join with you today in what will go down in history as the greatest demonstration for freedom in the history of our nation. Five score years ago, a great American, in whose symbolic shadow we stand today, signed the Emancipation Proclamation. This momentous decree came as a great beacon light of hope to millions of Negro slaves who had been seared in the flames of withering injustice. It came as a joyous daybreak to end the long night of their captivity. But one hundred years later, the Negro is still not free. One hundred years later, the life of the Negro is still sadly crippled by the manacles of segregation and the chains of discrimination. One hundred years later, the Negro lives on a lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of material prosperity. One hundred years later, the Negro is still languishing in the corners of American society and finds himself an exile in his own land. So we have come here today to dramatize a shameful condition.
     
  14. Sheghwede

    Sheghwede JF-Expert Member

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    When right time comes, change is must. You can cheat people for some time, but you cant cheat them forever
     
  15. l

    lengijave Senior Member

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    Sheghwede,
    You remind me long time when Nigger fight 4 their rights,and now a president of America is black or mixed,
    But still there are more challange,why america abuse african continent?Do you think that it was fair when
    America killed Ghadafi? If it is ok there are no problem,why they sodomize Ghadafi?
    I have a dream that in many years to come africa continent will be free "by lengijave"
    Sheghwede is that your real picture? your looking so beautiful,i am not racist
     
  16. F

    FUSO JF-Expert Member

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    harakati za ukombozi huanzia bali sana, jiani kuna vikwazo vingi -- ni mwiko kukata tamaa...
     
  17. Sheghwede

    Sheghwede JF-Expert Member

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    Thanks for your appreciation on the subject matter. Either, thanks for the questions. About Gaddafi, US has positioned herself as the world PREFECT to make sure that wherever there is violation of human rights, she is read to intervene at any necessary costs. There is a lot of critics to this, but my only critic is her strategic involvement, that wherever she have intervened recently there is oil. One question is clear, is she doing it as a 'prefect' or she has economic interests?
    Putting aside all other variables, the leadership in Africa is questionable all over the world. You will agree with me, what is happening in Tanzania today, people may opt to go back to British Colonial Rule other than living in the current extreme corrupted system.
    Regardless the rest, Tanzanians and Africans today are not the same, they have changed and they need change. When the time comes, a good number of Martin Luther Kings will exist and the real change will come in place. That time has come and that time is now, take a chance
     
  18. SMU

    SMU JF-Expert Member

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    Inasisimua sana!
     
  19. a

    assadsyria3 JF-Expert Member

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    Kama ni mfuatiliaji wa siasa zetu hutakosa watu wakimshambulia mh zito kabwe km msaliti lakini wamesahau kazi kubwa alioifanya hadi leo kumbuka martin luther alisema i have a dream na leo obama ni raisi wa marekani. namshukuru zito kwa kujitoa katika mjadala wa kugombea uraisi ambao umemletea maadui wengi ndani na nje ya chama. tusisahau we are democratic country kuna freedom of speech kwann watu wakitoa maoni yao watu wawahukumu i dont get it. zito said i have a dream to become a leader in udsm he became, also he said i have a drem to be a member of perliament he became,now he said i have a dream to b a PRESIDENT i hope GOD will bless the dream and will become true. foolish people dicuss people philosopher discuss ideas.[​IMG]
     
  20. Patrickn

    Patrickn JF-Expert Member

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    Napenda nikuleee sehemu ya speech muhimu za Martin Luther King ili nawewe ikusaidie kujiongeza

    [h=3]1. Letter from Birmingham Jail — April 16, 1963[/h]While jailed for leading anti-segregation protests in Birmingham, King wrote this letter arguing that individuals have the moral duty to disobey unjust laws.
    We know through painful experience that freedom is never voluntarily given by the oppressor; it must be demanded by the oppressed. Frankly I have never yet engaged in a direct action movement that was "well timed," according to the timetable of those who have not suffered unduly from the disease of segregation. For years now I have heard the word "Wait!" It rings in the ear of every Negro with a piercing familiarity. This "wait" has almost always meant "never." We must come to see with the distinguished jurist of yesterday that "justice too long delayed is justice denied."





    [h=3]2. March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom — August 28, 1963[/h]The March on Washington took place in Washington, D.C., and was attended by 250,000 people. King's speech at the March remains one of the most famous speeches in American history. King started with prepared remarks but then departed from his script, shifting into the "I have a dream" theme he'd used on prior occasions, speaking of an America where his children "will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character." He followed this with an exhortation to "let freedom ring" across the nation, and concluded with:
    I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: “We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men are created equal.” I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slaveowners will be able to sit down together at a table of brotherhood. I have a dream that one day even the state of Mississippi, a desert state, sweltering with the heat of injustice and oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice. I have a dream that my four children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. I have a dream today.


    [h=3]3. Acceptance Speech at Nobel Peace Prize Ceremony — December 10, 1964[/h]At age 35, King became the youngest man to receive the Nobel Peace Prize. When he learned of the honor, he announced that he would donate all of the prize money ($54,123) to the civil rights movement.
    Therefore, I must ask why this prize is awarded to a movement which is beleaguered and committed to unrelenting struggle, and to a movement which has not yet won the very peace and brotherhood which is the essence of the Nobel Prize. After contemplation, I conclude that this award, which I receive on behalf of that movement, is a profound recognition that nonviolence is the answer to the crucial political and moral questions of our time: the need for man to overcome oppression and violence without resorting to violence and oppression.



    [h=3]4. Beyond Vietnam — April 4, 1967[/h]By 1967, King had become a passionate opponent of the Vietnam War. In this speech delivered at the Riverside Church in New York City, King referred tp the United States "the greatest purveyor of violence in the world today."
    Perhaps the more tragic recognition of reality took place when it became clear to me that the war was doing far more than devastating the hopes of the poor at home. It was sending their sons and their brothers and their husbands to fight and to die in extraordinarily high proportions relative to the rest of the population. We were taking the black young men who had been crippled by our society and sending them eight thousand miles away to guarantee liberties in Southeast Asia which they had not found in southwest Georgia and East Harlem. So we have been repeatedly faced with the cruel irony of watching Negro and white boys on TV screens as they kill and die together for a nation that has been unable to seat them together in the same schools. So we watch them in brutal solidarity burning the huts of a poor village, but we realize that they would never live on the same block in Detroit. I could not be silent in the face of such cruel manipulation of the poor.




    [h=3]5. I've Been To The Mountaintop — April 3, 1968[/h]On the eve of a protest march for striking garbage workers in Memphis, Tenn., King gave this darkly prescient speech. The next day he was assassinated.
    Well, I don't know what will happen now. We've got some difficult days ahead. But it doesn't matter with me now. Because I've been to the mountaintop. And I don't mind. Like anybody, I would like to live a long life. Longevity has its place. But I'm not concerned about that now. I just want to do God's will. And He's allowed me to go up to the mountain. And I've looked over. And I've seen the promised land. I may not get there with you. But I want you to know tonight, that we, as a people, will get to the promised land. And I'm happy, tonight. I'm not worried about anything. I'm not fearing any man. Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord.
     
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