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Marekani yakiri Irani haitengenezi mabomu ya nyuklia

Discussion in 'Jukwaa la Siasa' started by Gamba la Nyoka, Dec 4, 2007.

  1. Gamba la Nyoka

    Gamba la Nyoka JF-Expert Member

    #1
    Dec 4, 2007
    Joined: May 1, 2007
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    katika hali ya kushangaza, leo hii jumuia ya kipelelezi ya marekani(NIE)imetoa taarifa yake rasmi, na kusema kwamba KWA HIVI SASA IRANI haina mradi wa mabomu ya Nyuklia.

    hata hivyo taarifa hiyo imesema kwamba IRani ilikuwa na mpango huo lakini wakaustisha mwaka 2003.
    Taarifa hiyo imepelekea mixed signal duniani,huku watu wengine wakihoji credibility ya Uongozi wa George bush kushikilia bango kwamba irani inatengeneza mabomu ya Nyuklia.

    wakati huohuo ofisa mmoja wa ngazi za juu katika serikali ya Irani amesema kwamba , irani haijawahi kuwa na mradi huo, haina mradi huo,na haitakuwa na mradi huo kwa sababumabomu ya Nyuklia hayamo katika sera ya ulinzi ya nchi hiyo.

    Wakati huo huo leo Raisi bush ameongea na waandishi wa habari na kuelezea kuwa ,maadamu irani ilishawahi kuwa na mpango huo zamani basi jumuia ya kimataifa Haina budi kuendelea kuibana ili isitishe mradi wao wa sasa wa kueinrich uranium. akasema maadamu zamani walishaficha mradi wa mabomu basi wasiaminiwe hata hii sasa.

    Wana Jf mnaichukuliaje hii sudden Turn of events?. who is going to win this tuff diplomatic chess game, Iran or US, why?
     
  2. BAK

    BAK JF-Expert Member

    #2
    Dec 4, 2007
    Joined: Feb 11, 2007
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    Bush: No change in Iran policy

    Mark Tran, Simon Jeffery in Washington and agencies
    Tuesday December 4, 2007
    Guardian Unlimited

    George Bush today ruled out a change in Washington's Iran policy following the declassification yesterday of a US intelligence report that concluded Tehran had abandoned its nuclear weapons programme in 2003.
    The US president denied the national intelligence estimate (NIE) - which said Tehran's determination to develop nuclear weapons "is less ... than we have been judging" - had undercut his administration's repeated assertions that Iran was building nuclear weapons.

    "Iran was dangerous. Iran is dangerous. And Iran will be dangerous if they have the knowledge necessary to make a nuclear weapon," Bush told his first White House press conference in nearly seven weeks.

    He said the US would continue to work to "isolate" Iran, claiming the NIE was a "warning signal" to the international community.
    "I think it is very important for the international community to recognise the fact that if Iran were to develop the knowledge that they could transfer to a clandestine program, it would create a danger of the world.

    "And so, I view this report as a warning signal that they had the programme, they halted the programme. The reason why it's a warning signal is they could restart it."

    As recently as October, Bush was invoking the threat of a third world war if Iran was not prevented from obtaining the necessary knowledge to make a nuclear weapon.

    Asked if he had been "hyping" the threat from Iran, Bush said he was only made aware of the NIE last week and insisted it had changed nothing. "I still feel strongly that Iran is a danger. I think the NIE makes it clear that Iran needs to be taken seriously as a threat to peace. My opinion hasn't changed."

    The US intelligence estimate is unfortunate timing for the Bush administration because it could take the steam out of its efforts to push for further sanctions against Iran at the UN.

    Iran today welcomed the NIE as proof of its peaceful nuclear intentions. The Iranian foreign minister, Manouchehr Mottaki, speaking before Bush, said he welcomed the US move to "correct" its previous assertions.

    "It's natural that we welcome it when those countries who in the past have questions and ambiguities about this case... now amend their views realistically," he told state radio. "The condition of Iran's peaceful nuclear activities is becoming clear to the world."

    The report was, however, contradicted by Israel. Its defence minister, Ehud Barak, claimed that Iran had restarted its military nuclear programme.

    "It's apparently true that in 2003 Iran stopped pursuing its military nuclear programme for a time. But in our opinion, since then it has apparently continued that programme," he told army radio.

    Barak said Israel was "familiar with this American assessment" but there "are differences in the assessments of different organisations in the world about this, and only time will tell who is right."

    Israel has not ruled out military action against Iran, but says it prefers a diplomatic solution. Asked if the new US assessment reduced the likelihood of a US military strike on Iran, Barak said it was "possible".

    Israel has backed US-led efforts at the UN to impose sanctions on Iran for its refusal to halt uranium enrichment, a process that can be used to develop nuclear weapons.

    Britain, which has backed the US campaign for sanctions against Iran, also said the risk remained of Iran acquiring nuclear weapons despite the US intelligence report.

    The report, Downing Street said, "shows the intent is there and the risk of Iran acquiring a nuclear weapon remains a very serious issue".

    Gordon Brown's spokesman added: "We do need to examine the details of this report. But in overall terms the government believes that the report confirms we were right to be worried about Iran seeking to develop nuclear weapons."

    Critics of the administration's policy on Iran have seized upon the report to argue against military action.

    The intelligence finding removes, "if nothing else, the urgency that we have to attack Iran, or knock out facilities", said Chuck Hagel, a Republican senator. "I don't think you can overstate the importance of this."

    The Democratic leader of the US senate, Harry Reid, urged the White House to adjust its policy and pursue "a diplomatic surge" to engage with Iran.

    *~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*

    World reaction to Iran nuclear report


    Tuesday December 4, 2007
    Guardian Unlimited


    A report by US intelligence agencies has contradicted Washington's claims that Iran is actively pursuing a nuclear weapons programme, concluding instead that such work stopped four years ago.
    Reaction to the surprise findings has been varied:

    Iran's foreign minister, Manouchehr Mottaki
    "It's natural that we welcome it when those countries who in the past have questions and ambiguities about this case ... now amend their views realistically."

    The Iranian foreign ministry spokesman, Mohammad Ali Hosseini
    "Remarks by Bush and other US administration officials, who have continuously talked about the danger of Iran's nuclear programme, are baseless and unreliable."

    Israel's defence minister, Ehud Barak
    "It's apparently true that in 2003 Iran stopped pursuing its military nuclear programme for a time. But in our opinion, since then it has apparently continued that programme."
    Gordon Brown's official spokesman
    "In overall terms, the government believes that the report confirms we were right to be worried about Iran seeking to develop nuclear weapons. It also shows that the sanctions programme and international pressure has had some effect. It also shows the intent is there and the risk of Iran acquiring a nuclear weapon remains a very serious issue."

    Harry Reid, the Democrat Senate majority leader
    "I hope this administration reads this report carefully and appropriately adjusts its rhetoric and policy vis-a-vis Iran."

    The Russian president, Vladimir Putin (speaking to Iran's chief nuclear negotiator)
    "We expect that your programmes in the nuclear sphere will be open, transparent and be conducted under control of the authoritative international organisation."

    The French foreign ministry's spokesman
    "It appears that Iran is not respecting its international obligations. We must keep up the pressure on Iran ... we will continue to work on the introduction of restrictive measures in the framework of the United Nations."

     
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