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Mahakama yaruhusu kesi za waanga wa ubaguzi wa rangi Africa Kusinikuishtaki IBM et al

Discussion in 'International Forum' started by Shadow, Apr 10, 2009.

  1. Shadow

    Shadow JF-Expert Member

    #1
    Apr 10, 2009
    Joined: May 19, 2008
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    US court allows apartheid cases [​IMG]General Motors is one of the companies set to
    face legal action [EPA]
    A US court has ruled that victims of South Africa's apartheid-era government can sue General Motors, IBM and other corporations accused of complicity in human rights abuses.
    A federal judge in New York ruled on Wednesday that joint actions against the corporations under a US law allowing rights claims from abroad should be addressed in a US court.
    Car-makers Ford and Daimler and defence firm Rheinmetall are the other companies set to face legal action from South African plaintiffs.
    However, Judge Shira Scheindlin also dismissed claims against banks UBS and Barclays but allowed the plaintiffs the opportunity to refile their case against electronics firm Fujitsu.
    Michael Hausfeld, one of the lawyers representing the South African plaintiffs, said the verdict was "a major advancement in international law".
    Torture claims
    The lawsuits argue that the car-makers knew their vehicles were being used by South African forces to violently suppress protests.
    "That level of wilful blindness in the face of crimes in violation of the law of nations cannot defeat an otherwise clear showing of knowledge that the assistance IBM provided would directly and substantially support apartheid"
    Shira Scheindlin,
    US judge
    They also claim that IBM and Fujitsu knew their computers were being used by South Africa's white minority government to help strip black citizens of their rights.
    Apartheid ended in 1994 when South Africa held its first free elections, bringing Nelson Mandela and the African National Congress to power.
    The judge disagreed with arguments made by the companies that it was not their responsibility to tell clients how to use their products.
    "That level of wilful blindness in the face of crimes in violation of the law of nations cannot defeat an otherwise clear showing of knowledge that the assistance IBM provided would directly and substantially support apartheid," she said.
    Scheindlen allowed lawsuits against IBM for "aiding and abetting arbitrary denationalisation and apartheid".
    She said that the plaintiffs could pursue claims against Daimler, GM and Ford "for aiding and abetting torture... extrajudicial killing, and apartheid".
    And against Rheinmetall, the German parent company of Swiss-based arms manufacturer Oerlikon, for "aiding and abetting extrajudicial killing and apartheid".
    Khulumani, a South African organisation that helps apartheid victims and is one of the plaintiffs in the court action, hailed the court decision.
    "We are convinced that this lawsuit, should it be successful, will go a long way in satisfying members' material needs; and that will go a long way in contributing to social reconciliation," said Marjorie Jobson, a Khulumani director.

    Source:
    Al Jazeera English - Americas - US court allows apartheid cases
     
  2. T

    The Truth JF-Expert Member

    #2
    Apr 11, 2009
    Joined: Oct 21, 2007
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    The actual apartheid victims will see very little or no money at all if these lawsuits succeed. This is all about lawyers and/or their cronies getting rich rather than correcting any wrongs of the past. Such lawsuits should be tossed out immediately.
     
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