Dismiss Notice
You are browsing this site as a guest. It takes 2 minutes to CREATE AN ACCOUNT and less than 1 minute to LOGIN

Kitumbuwa Kimeingia mchanga hakiliki tena

Discussion in 'Habari na Hoja mchanganyiko' started by Genderi, Jan 14, 2012.

  1. Genderi

    Genderi Senior Member

    #1
    Jan 14, 2012
    Joined: Dec 26, 2011
    Messages: 102
    Likes Received: 0
    Trophy Points: 0
    Bacon and sausage increase pancreatic cancer risk by 19%
    Eating two slices of bacon - or one sausage - a day can increase a person's risk of developing pancreatic cancer by 19 percent, a study out of Sweden has found.
    News DeskJanuary 13, 2012 14:40
    Italian opera singer Luciano Pavarotti performs during part of his round-the-world farewell tour concert at the Capital Gymnasium on December 10, 2005, in Beijing, China. He died from pancreatic cancer on September 6, 2007.
    ( China photo / Getty Images )
    Eating two slices of bacon - or one sausage - a day can increase a person's risk of developing pancreatic cancer by 19 percent, a study out of Sweden has found.
    Pancreatic cancer kills 80 percent of people in under a year of being diagnosed; only 5 percent of patients are still alive after five years, according to The Guardian.
    Eating 1.8 ounces of processed meat every day - the equivalent to one sausage or two rashers of bacon - increases the risk by 19 percent, and the risk goes up if a person eats more, the paper cites experts from the "respected" Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden, as saying.
    The findings after examining data from 11 studies, including 6,643 cases of pancreatic cancer, were published in the British Journal of Cancer.
    "Pancreatic cancer has poor survival rates," the Daily Mail quoted Susanna Larsson from the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm as saying. "So it's important to understand what can increase the risk of this disease."
    Fox News cited experts as saying the overall risk of pancreatic cancer was relatively low. Most people have only a 1.4 percent chance of getting pancreatic cancer, reported Dr. Richard Besser, ABC News's senior health and medical editor. "If you have a serving of processed meat per day, your risk would go up to 1.7 percent; still very small."
    It is dubbed "the silent killer," as it often does not produce symptoms - such as back pain, loss of appetite and weight loss - in the early stages, according to ANI, which adds that:
    Little is known about its causes other than that smoking, excess alcohol and being overweight all seem to contribute.
    The risk posed by eating meat was substantially lower than for smoking, found to increase the likelihood of pancreatic cancer by 74 percent, according to the reports.
    Meanwhile, ordinary red meat, like steak, reportedly increases a man's chance of getting the cancer, but not a woman's.
    Scroll through the slideshow above to see what public figures have been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer.
     
  2. Genderi

    Genderi Senior Member

    #2
    Jan 14, 2012
    Joined: Dec 26, 2011
    Messages: 102
    Likes Received: 0
    Trophy Points: 0
    Bacon and sausage increase pancreatic cancer risk by 19%
    Eating two slices of bacon — or one sausage — a day can increase a person's risk of developing pancreatic cancer by 19 percent, a study out of Sweden has found.
    News DeskJanuary 13, 2012
    Eating two slices of bacon — or one sausage — a day can increase a person's risk of developing pancreatic cancer by 19 percent, a study out of Sweden has found.
    Pancreatic cancer kills 80 percent of people in under a year of being diagnosed; only 5 percent of patients are still alive after five years, according to The Guardian.
    Eating 1.8 ounces of processed meat every day — the equivalent to one sausage or two rashers of bacon — increases the risk by 19 percent, and the risk goes up if a person eats more, the paper cites experts from the "respected" Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden, as saying.
    The findings after examining data from 11 studies, including 6,643 cases of pancreatic cancer, were published in the British Journal of Cancer.
    "Pancreatic cancer has poor survival rates," the Daily Mail quoted Susanna Larsson from the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm as saying. "So it's important to understand what can increase the risk of this disease."
    Fox News cited experts as saying the overall risk of pancreatic cancer was relatively low. Most people have only a 1.4 percent chance of getting pancreatic cancer, reported Dr. Richard Besser, ABC News's senior health and medical editor. “If you have a serving of processed meat per day, your risk would go up to 1.7 percent; still very small.”
    It is dubbed "the silent killer," as it often does not produce symptoms — such as back pain, loss of appetite and weight loss — in the early stages, according to ANI, which adds that:
    Little is known about its causes other than that smoking, excess alcohol and being overweight all seem to contribute.
    The risk posed by eating meat was substantially lower than for smoking, found to increase the likelihood of pancreatic cancer by 74 percent, according to the reports.
    [​IMG]
    Meanwhile, ordinary red meat, like steak, reportedly increases a man’s chance of getting the cancer, but not a woman’s.
    Scroll through the slideshow above to see what public figures have been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer.
     
  3. Mwali

    Mwali JF-Expert Member

    #3
    Jan 14, 2012
    Joined: Nov 9, 2011
    Messages: 7,032
    Likes Received: 18
    Trophy Points: 0
    Hiyo tittle yako mmmhh?
     
  4. TheChoji

    TheChoji JF-Expert Member

    #4
    Jan 14, 2012
    Joined: Apr 14, 2009
    Messages: 609
    Likes Received: 36
    Trophy Points: 45
    Mwe...!
     
  5. m

    mhondo JF-Expert Member

    #5
    Jan 14, 2012
    Joined: Apr 23, 2011
    Messages: 969
    Likes Received: 13
    Trophy Points: 35
    Ingekuwa vızurı angeandıka hata sausage nı hatarı kwa kongosho. Nılıona kwenye TBC1 kuwa nyama zılızosındıkwa zına sababısha kansa ya kongosho zıkıwemo na sausage..
     
Loading...