Dismiss Notice
You are browsing this site as a guest. It takes 2 minutes to CREATE AN ACCOUNT and less than 1 minute to LOGIN

Kenya's Fibre Bonanza- from a south african perspective and analysis

Discussion in 'Kenyan News and Politics' started by Nairoberry, Jun 5, 2012.

  1. Nairoberry

    Nairoberry JF-Expert Member

    #1
    Jun 5, 2012
    Joined: Mar 7, 2012
    Messages: 570
    Likes Received: 2
    Trophy Points: 35
    Down one of the streets of Nairobi there is an 8 megabits per second fibre connection to a Kenyan home that I stayed in last week.

    It is remarkable for a few reasons: the connection is the newer much faster fibre-optics; and it's for unlimited data, like broadband is around the world.

    But the outstanding feature is the price: a mere $50 (about R435) a month for what the industry calls triple-play: an internet connection, a phone line and a TV service.

    The service, called Zuku, is offered by Wananchi, one of the largest service providers in Kenya. "The cable TV is a bonus," another subscriber told me.

    In a related development, Wananchi has begun offering a free wireless service around Nairobi called Wazi WiFi, hoping, like San Francisco, to kickstart entrepreneurial activity.

    Kenya is well known for its clever mobile services, especially the remarkable mapping service Ushahidi and M-Pesa, the mobile payment system through which 20% of the Kenyan GDP now passes.

    It is a hotbed of innovation and entrepreneurial spirit, which was on display last week at the Open Africa Innovation Summit in Nairobi.

    The signs of Kenyan telecoms success are everywhere, nowhere more so than with fibre services like Zuku and Wazi.

    This is starkly contrasted with the state of telecoms in South Africa where Telkom continues to be an embarrassing albatross.

    The government, Telkom's major shareholder, bizarrely backtracked on its support for the proposed 20% investment by Korea Telecoms last week.

    Forget that Eskom plunged the country into darkness a few years ago, Telkom is one of the most key strategic assets that has kept us in the dark ages.

    It should be upgrading its extensive network to provide fibre to the home, the wired internet access required for next-generation internet content.

    If Kenya, with all of its infrastructure problems, can do it, what is taking Telkom so long?

    We can debate the value of having a foreign investor - a previous consortium is considered responsible for the massive R3.5-billion fine proposed by the Competition Commission for anti-competitive behaviour a decade ago.

    The South Korean potential partner has rightly been worried about this fine, and the impact it will have on Telkom's depleted cash reserves. Its offer was contingent on the outcome of the competition decision; and it's difficult to say if the fine will have any positive impact on Telkom's future.

    But what is clear is that Telkom needs some inspiration.

    After selling its stake in Vodacom, it built its own cellular operator, 8ta, which is haemorrhaging money (a loss of R1.1-billion last year). With Cell C announcing aggressive price cuts, it will put 8ta - which is competing for the same pay-as-you-go market - under more pressure.

    Telkom has meanwhile lost untold numbers of both voice and data users to the mobile networks because the fixed-line provider still appears not to have realised broadband is a volume business. Mobile data prices are still high, even if they have fallen over the years.

    It's not all Telkom's fault. The government has failed the South African consumer by neglecting to provide the right regulatory environment for competition to thrive.

    Telkom, which this week was said to be perhaps the biggest telecoms operator in Africa, has announced it is trialling fibre and an upgrade to its ADSL network later this year. Meanwhile, the rest of the industry is eating the once proud monopoly's lunch. And, as Kenya shows, with the right regulatory support, anything is possible.

    Telkom snoozed and it's losing



    Kenya's fibre bonanza - Times LIVE
     
  2. Nairoberry

    Nairoberry JF-Expert Member

    #2
    Jun 5, 2012
    Joined: Mar 7, 2012
    Messages: 570
    Likes Received: 2
    Trophy Points: 35
    nimefurahishwa sana na hii habari ya huyu jamaa wa afrika kusini,hao ni maadui nambari moja wa kenya na ukiona vyaelea jua vimeundwa
     
  3. Kabaridi

    Kabaridi JF-Expert Member

    #3
    Jun 5, 2012
    Joined: Nov 15, 2011
    Messages: 2,028
    Likes Received: 0
    Trophy Points: 133
    Ninapotizama telecoms ya kenya, ipo nambari moja only rivaled by North african countries. Ingawa kawaida unajua media hype iko tu kwenye maovu. However if we can adopt a well organized documentation strategy and policy for such innovations to counter negative hype from the media, this country can be the model that most countries in Africa may want to emulate.

    ...................And also the way Europe and America are so into the intellectual-property-act/business. Such key innovations can be protected before international thugs attach business trademarks

    The MPESA model that has been adopted far and wide as London. ANF, there was a CEO from a certain Hispanic country ambaye alikuja all the way from his country just to see the /Safaricom/MPESA model work. Companies like super-sport are getting a run for their money from companies like zUku n the true entreprenual spirit.
     
  4. Smatta

    Smatta JF-Expert Member

    #4
    Jun 6, 2012
    Joined: Nov 5, 2008
    Messages: 2,231
    Likes Received: 140
    Trophy Points: 160
    Kinachouma ni kuwa hakuna anayetaka kusikia haya, watu wanashabikia sana negativity, if this post was talking about something negative in Kenya, everyone and their mothers would be here commenting. Kenya is on the right track, especially in ICT, the future of Kenya lies on the oncoming election.
     
  5. Nairoberry

    Nairoberry JF-Expert Member

    #5
    Jun 6, 2012
    Joined: Mar 7, 2012
    Messages: 570
    Likes Received: 2
    Trophy Points: 35
    why cant askari kanzu and his side kicks contribute to this most beneficial thread why why why??? ab tichaz please say something :glasses-nerdy: :glasses-nerdy:
     
  6. kshaka

    kshaka JF-Expert Member

    #6
    Jun 6, 2012
    Joined: Nov 3, 2011
    Messages: 366
    Likes Received: 1
    Trophy Points: 0
    I have a feeling some are looking for a photo of a broken telephone pole in Kenya before they join this thread...I can provide a photo to set them off :)
     
  7. Saint Ivuga

    Saint Ivuga JF-Expert Member

    #7
    Jun 6, 2012
    Joined: Aug 21, 2008
    Messages: 31,159
    Likes Received: 5,700
    Trophy Points: 280
    i hope these somaliz will not blow your fibre cable
     
  8. Nairoberry

    Nairoberry JF-Expert Member

    #8
    Jun 6, 2012
    Joined: Mar 7, 2012
    Messages: 570
    Likes Received: 2
    Trophy Points: 35
    dont you think you are losing it a full saint thinking evil and by the way there are thousands of those fibre optics cables criss crossing nairobi
     
  9. kshaka

    kshaka JF-Expert Member

    #9
    Jun 6, 2012
    Joined: Nov 3, 2011
    Messages: 366
    Likes Received: 1
    Trophy Points: 0
    Here we go!
     
  10. Saint Ivuga

    Saint Ivuga JF-Expert Member

    #10
    Jun 6, 2012
    Joined: Aug 21, 2008
    Messages: 31,159
    Likes Received: 5,700
    Trophy Points: 280
    where? you should ask yourself what are you doing in Somali. you dont know the meaning of negotiation?
     
  11. kshaka

    kshaka JF-Expert Member

    #11
    Jun 6, 2012
    Joined: Nov 3, 2011
    Messages: 366
    Likes Received: 1
    Trophy Points: 0
    blah blah blah...Somalia...blah blah blah...Kenya is bad...blah blah

    What has that got to do with this?
     
  12. Kabaridi

    Kabaridi JF-Expert Member

    #12
    Jun 6, 2012
    Joined: Nov 15, 2011
    Messages: 2,028
    Likes Received: 0
    Trophy Points: 133
    Probably those who comment negatively have nothing positive to show but intellectual dearths. And I do not think kenya will sink again like the 2007/8PEV. That was just an error triggered by the actions of hot-headed/selfcentered politicians. Pessimists have all dagger and pens drawn to spell and articulate doom for Kenya. I think the leadership/style to advocate for president in this country should be changed.
     
  13. m

    moyo JF-Expert Member

    #13
    Jun 7, 2012
    Joined: Jan 12, 2010
    Messages: 252
    Likes Received: 0
    Trophy Points: 0
     
  14. b

    bagamoyo JF-Expert Member

    #14
    Jun 7, 2012
    Joined: Jan 14, 2010
    Messages: 3,087
    Likes Received: 734
    Trophy Points: 280
  15. leh

    leh JF-Expert Member

    #15
    Jun 7, 2012
    Joined: May 30, 2012
    Messages: 845
    Likes Received: 21
    Trophy Points: 35

    nataka kujua wat that means exactly. i mean, do u hit 8Mb/s downloads au?? sipo hapa kubash or anything but I can tell u, I pay an arm and a leg for a crappy connection. and yes *sigh* I know tz is no isp paradise, but still, 50$ for such a high speed connection (not including the extras) ??? forgive my skeptism, but nataka proof!! something like my screen shot below ambayo nimechukua right now
    View attachment 55699
     
  16. M

    Mnairobi JF-Expert Member

    #16
    Jun 8, 2012
    Joined: Oct 27, 2007
    Messages: 250
    Likes Received: 1
    Trophy Points: 0
    www.zuku.co.ke/triple-play/triple-play-packages.html
     
  17. leh

    leh JF-Expert Member

    #17
    Jun 9, 2012
    Joined: May 30, 2012
    Messages: 845
    Likes Received: 21
    Trophy Points: 35
    thank u for the link. its as I suspected, an 8Mbps speed or rather 1Mb/s (and thats the very highest u could possibly get). still a good deal for 50$, hongereni kenya but we (we being EAC) still have a long way to go kabla ya kufika true speed capabilities
     
Loading...