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It's official-The Carter III cracks a million sales in it's first week

Discussion in 'Entertainment' started by Nyani Ngabu, Jun 18, 2008.

  1. Nyani Ngabu

    Nyani Ngabu Platinum Member

    #1
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    Weezy F Baby kiboko. He's the new king of hip hop.....
     
  2. Yo Yo

    Yo Yo JF-Expert Member

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    [​IMG]
    Jamaa kiboko
     
  3. Icadon

    Icadon JF-Expert Member

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    Kuna mtu yoyote ameshaisikiliza hii album...? nimesikia tracks mbili tu..Hopefully weekend hii nitaisikiliza vizuri.
     
  4. Nyani Ngabu

    Nyani Ngabu Platinum Member

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    Mazee....iko tight kichizi!! Ni classic flani hivi...my fav is 'A milli'....kuna remix yake 'A billi' feat the big hommie....
     
  5. Pundit

    Pundit JF-Expert Member

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    Rolling Stone loves it.

    http://www.rollingstone.com/reviews/album/21080575/tha_carter_iii

    OK, it's true: he really is the best rapper alive. Lil Wayne made that claim on his last official CD, in 2005, and since then, he's unleashed an astonishing torrent of mixtapes, leaks and guest appearances to back up the boast. So his long-anticipated "legit" album follow-up feels a bit gratuitous. Still, Tha Carter III is useful as an exclamation point. It establishes beyond a doubt that the zeitgeist in 2008 belongs to one artist: a dreadlocked dadaist poet from New Orleans with a bad weed habit and a voice like a bullfrog. As Wayne croaks in the woozy "3Peat," "Get on my level/You can't get on my level/You will need a space shuttle/Or a ladder that's forever."
    Wayne has taken the task of album-making seriously: This isn't a mixtape, it's a suite of songs, paced and sequenced for maxaqimum impact. He's collected sleek, powerful beats from top producers (Kanye West, Swizz Beatz), enlisted A-list guest stars (Jay-Z, T-Pain) and served up a range of textures and moods, from the elegiac Hurricane Katrina protest "Tie My Hands" to the bubblegum bumper "Lollipop," in which Weezy has a laugh at selling out by creating the most outrageously pumped-up sellout single in history. Thematically, Carter III is a victory lap. In the hilarious "Dr Carter," he boasts about resuscitating hip-hop: "As I put the light down his throat/I can only see flow/His blood's starting to flow/His lungs starting to grow."

    As usual, Wayne's tumbling freestyle rhymes are full of imagination and surprise, but his voice itself is half the fun. He shouts, gasps, tries a Caribbean patois, sings snatches of "Umbrella" and "Irreplaceable," and impersonates E.T. He loves that brother-from-another-planet stuff —"I am a Martian," he raps —but it's clear he's also thinking about his worldly legacy. The album cover links Carter III to Biggie's Ready to Die and Nas' Illmatic, and he makes no bones about coveting a spot in hip-hop's pantheon. "Next time you mention Pac, Biggie or Jay-Z/Don't forget Weezy Baby," he advises on "Mr Carter." It's sound advice.
     
  6. Pundit

    Pundit JF-Expert Member

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    The Wash Post loathed it

    http://www.mercurynews.com/music/ci_9609893

    CD review: Rapper Lil Wayne bizarre but brilliant on new disc
    By J. Freedom du Lac
    Washington Post
    Article Launched: 06/17/2008 01:34:35 AM PDT


    Some rappers aspire to keep it real. Lil Wayne, it seems, aims to keep it surreal.

    The New Orleans rapper opens his uneven new album, "Tha Carter III," with a manifesto about . . . well, it's not exactly clear.

    As with many Lil Wayne songs, "3Peat" isn't really about something specific. Instead, it's a wild, winding showcase for Wayne's spontaneous non sequiturs. Over strings and synths and a booming drum track, the king of meandering metaphors rattles off a string of free-form lyrics about shooting grandmothers; babies being kidnapped; his own greatness; a near-death experience; Viagra; Adam Sandler; the new house he bought for his mother; ESPN; and (again) his greatness.

    "I know what you watchin: I Me I I! I," he boasts in that distinctive raspy croak. "You watch me, you watch me / 'Cause I be Weezy / Must-see TV."

    As an album-opener, it's completely bizarre. It's also utterly compelling, which more or less sums up Lil Wayne's appeal.

    At 25, Dwayne Michael Carter Jr. might not be the greatest rapper alive, as he's declared repeatedly, but he's certainly one of the weirdest and most magnetic.

    Consider that he also raps like an alien on "Tha Carter III" ("Phone Home"); plays a hip-hop quack ("Dr. Carter"); spends most of an entire verse rhyming about Beyonce songs (the Babyface duet "Comfortable"); fantasizes about getting it on with a policewoman ("Mrs. Officer"); suddenly starts thinking about rats (the dazzling "You Ain't


    Got Nuthin' on Me"); and closes the album with a 10-minute track (the Nina Simone-sampling "Dontgetit") in which he spends most of the time talking - rambling, really - about mandatory-sentencing laws and Al Sharpton.
    Lil Wayne is nothing if not inexplicable, which even he seems to understand in his often-intoxicated state. "I can explain me in one word: Unexplainable," the pot-smoking, cough-syrup-guzzling rapper told the Guardian of London recently. (In that same interview, he also confirmed what anybody who's spent any time with his music has long suspected, telling the Guardian, "I'm crazy.")

    "Tha Carter III" was the most anticipated rap album of 2007 before leaks pushed the release date into 2008 and Wayne started working anew on the album. The delays hardly diminished the anticipation; in fact, it increased as Lil Wayne continued to turn heads with his mix tapes and countless guest turns on other people's songs.

    "Tha Carter III" doesn't quite live up to those lofty expectations, as it's a little bit too disjointed and self-indulgent for its own good, with a few too many nonsensical lyrics. "My picture should be in the dictionary next to the definition of definition," he announces on "Shoot Me Down." You don't say.

    On a scale ranging from flat-out failure to game-changing masterpiece, "Tha Carter III" is merely really good - which is disappointing given the buildup and the strength of some of Wayne's recent work, including the 2007 mix tape "Da Drought 3."

    Perhaps he's become a little bit bored by his own brilliance. Or maybe he's just gassed: Wayne was so prolific last year that Vibe magazine published a list of the Top 77 Lil Wayne songs of 2007 - a year in which he never actually released a proper studio album.

    "Tha Carter III" has plenty of great moments, though. Wayne still has a knack for keen wordplay ("I don't O U like two vowels," he raps on the club banger "A Milli"), and he sounds particularly inspired on the post-Katrina lament "Tie My Hands," a duet with the blue-eyed soul singer Robin Thicke. "Let the Beat Build" is a standout, a shifty track on which Lil Wayne is at his swaggering, unhinged best.

    And lead single "Lollipop" - a down-and-dirty ode to oral sex - showed that Wayne could frolic in the crossover commercial sandbox without reining in his own impulses to be outrageous and unconventional. The lewd song currently sits at No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100.

    Lil Wayne, pop star? A surreal concept, indeed.
     
  7. Pundit

    Pundit JF-Expert Member

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    But they are both not authorities on the subject, too bad I cant find a SOHH.com review.
     
  8. Kuhani

    Kuhani JF-Expert Member

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    Na wewe unamamlaka ya kuchagua wenye mamlaka wasio na review?
     
  9. Pundit

    Pundit JF-Expert Member

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    Nani kachagua wenye mamlaka?
     
  10. Kuhani

    Kuhani JF-Expert Member

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    Umesema Washington Post na Rolling Stone hawana mamlaka katika masuala ya hip hop!

     
  11. Pundit

    Pundit JF-Expert Member

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    It can be successfully argued kwamba kusema asiye na mamlaka si kuchagua aliye mamlaka.

    No?
     
  12. Pundit

    Pundit JF-Expert Member

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    Weezy, like The Game, is a fraudulent fad festooned to fork a fortune from fans and fade.
     
  13. Nyani Ngabu

    Nyani Ngabu Platinum Member

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    Numbers don't lie...wenye mamlaka (wapenzi/ washabiki wake) have spoken. A million sales in a week is an amazing feat, period!
     
  14. Pundit

    Pundit JF-Expert Member

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    I am not talking about sales, if you talk sales mbona Jiggah ana sale kuliko Common, Kweli na Guru.

    Lakini Jiggah mwenyewe anakwambia ana wish angeweza ku rhyme kama Kweli na Common?

    I'm taking authentic street credentials, not a following of a million crackheads and their immediate friends.

    If you ask me T.I has better beats, production and rhymes than Weezy.
     
  15. Kuhani

    Kuhani JF-Expert Member

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    No.

    Ulichagua mwenye mamlaka.

    Ukiona bao linaelekea kusiko, ndugu yangu, unapangurua kete mapema, tunaanza upya, halafu mimi na wewe tu ndio tutajua mchezo umekwendaje! LOL!
     
  16. Pundit

    Pundit JF-Expert Member

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    If I can't even find a SOHH.com review how can you say kwamba niliwachagua wao kuwa ndiyo mamlaka?

    Sohh.COM used to be the one stop shop for Hip Hop news, not anymore, hence too bad....
     
  17. Kuhani

    Kuhani JF-Expert Member

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    Acha ku-spin we kaidi wewe!

    Umesema Washington Post na Rolling Stone hawana mamlaka, halafu ukasikitika huwezi kupata review ya Sohh.COM. Sasa mana yake nini kama sio kusema Sohh.com ndio wana mamlaka? Na kama sio wakali tena, mbona unajiuma uma kusema unatafuta review yao huipati?

    Acha kujikanyaga we mtu!
     
  18. Pundit

    Pundit JF-Expert Member

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    Hahaha,

    Kijana angalia usilazimishe hoja.

    Natafuta nazi, naona koroma tupu, then nasema duka la Mwinyi Haji lilikuwa na nazi nzuri lakini hauzi nazi tena.

    Unaniambia nimeshachagua nazi tayari?
     
  19. Nyani Ngabu

    Nyani Ngabu Platinum Member

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    I think the respect is mutual. Both Common and Kweli would say the same about Jigga. Plus, the game is not just about rhyming.....it's about the metaphors and the subliminals that are contained in your rhymes. And, frankly the game has evolved so much nowadays.....Jigga's business acumen is far better than those three you mentioned....but definitely the cash register does put you among the creme de la creme of the game.

    But at the end of the day, it's a matter of taste.
     
  20. Pundit

    Pundit JF-Expert Member

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    Rhyming meaning the broader sense, lyrics, pun, metaphor, similes, sense.

    A matter of taste for sureI don't find a raspy croak and random stale braggadocio to be that appealing.
     
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