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Installation and setup overview

Discussion in 'Tech, Gadgets & Science Forum' started by MziziMkavu, Apr 17, 2010.

  1. MziziMkavu

    MziziMkavu JF-Expert Member

    #1
    Apr 17, 2010
    Joined: Feb 3, 2009
    Messages: 38,540
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    Windows XP is a powerful operating system that makes it easy to browse the Web, read e-mail, share pictures from your digital camera, listen to digital music, and much more. Whether you are upgrading a computer with an earlier operating system or installing Windows XP on a new computer, you can enjoy Windows XP in just a few hours.
    To get Windows XP running and ready to use on your PC
    1.
    Upgrade to or install Windows XP.
    If you currently have an older version of Windows, such as Windows Me, Windows 98, or Windows 2000, you can easily upgrade to Windows XP. After upgrading, your programs, files, and settings will be exactly where you left them. If you have a new computer, or if you want a clean installation on your existing computer, you can perform a new installation of Windows XP and transfer your files and settings later.
    2.
    Configure your network settings.
    If you didn't join a network when you installed Windows XP, you can connect to the Internet or your home network after you complete the setup. Connecting to a network allows you to browse the Web, read e-mail, listen to digital audio on your home stereo, watch recorded TV on your television, and play games online.
    3.
    Choose your language.
    If you didn't configure your preferred language during installation, you can configure it after setting up Windows XP. If you are multilingual, you can configure multiple languages and easily switch between them. Each person in your house can have his or her own individual language settings, too. You can also customize regional preferences, such as how currency and the date and time are displayed.
    4.
    Activate and register Windows XP.
    Activation confirms that your copy of Windows is genuine (rather than counterfeit), and registration allows Microsoft to notify you of new products, updates, and special offers. If you didn't activate Windows XP during installation, you need to do so within 30 days in order to continuing using it.
    5.
    Validate Windows XP.
    Validating Windows XP is an optional step that gives you access to hundreds of free downloads from the Microsoft Download Center.
    6.
    Transfer files and settings.
    If you installed Windows XP on a new computer, you can transfer your files and settings from your old computer to your new Windows XP computer. After transferring your files and settings, your new computer will feel just like your old computer, but with all the benefits of Windows XP.
    7.
    Create user accounts.
    Everyone who uses your computer should have their own user account so that they can have personalized settings and private files. If you did not create a user account for everyone in your family during installation, you can add users after Windows XP is set up. Each user can have separate languages, programs, settings, and documents.
    Once Windows XP is set up, you and your family can enjoy everything Windows XP has to offer.
     
  2. MziziMkavu

    MziziMkavu JF-Expert Member

    #2
    Apr 17, 2010
    Joined: Feb 3, 2009
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    Activate and register Windows XP

    Published: September 7, 2006
    After you install Windows XP, you'll be asked to activate and register the software. Though activating and registering sound similar, these are actually two different steps that provide different benefits.
    Activation is the process that unlocks Windows XP. This process helps ensure your software is genuine, which in turn helps protect you from inadvertently installing counterfeit software. If you were not able to activate Windows XP during the setup process, you should activate it as soon as possible after setup is complete. After 30 days, Microsoft will require you to activate Windows XP before allowing you to log on and use it. After you activate Windows XP, you can validate the operating system, which will grant you access to hundreds of free downloads.
    Registration is optional and provides Microsoft with your contact information so that they can notify you of important updates and offers.
    To activate and register Windows XP after you've completed setup
    1.
    Connect your computer to the Internet.
    2.
    Click Start, point to All Programs, and then click Activate Windows.
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    3.
    On the Let's activate Windows page, click Yes. Then, click Next.
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    4.
    On the Register with Microsoft? page, click Yes. Then, click Next.
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    5.
    On the Collecting registration data page, complete the form. Then, click Next.
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    6.
    The Activate Windows Wizard then connects to the Internet to activate and register your copy of Windows. On the Thank You! page, click OK.
    [​IMG]
    Now your copy of Windows XP is activated and registered.
    To receive the latest updates and free downloads from Microsoft, you have to complete one more step: Validate your genuine Windows XP.
     
  3. MziziMkavu

    MziziMkavu JF-Expert Member

    #3
    Apr 17, 2010
    Joined: Feb 3, 2009
    Messages: 38,540
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    Moving files and settings to a new computer running Windows XP


    You might want the high performance and powerful features of a new computer, but you don't want to give up the comfortable feeling of your old computer. You've arranged your desktop just the way you like, installed all your favorite programs, and organized your files so you can quickly find anything you need. Don't worry: If your new computer has Windows XP installed, you can use the Files and Settings Transfer Wizard to copy everything from your old computer to your new computer.
    Transfer files and settings across a network or cable

    If you bought a new computer and can run it at the same time as your old computer, you can use a home network or a cable to transfer your files and settings. To use a home network, connect both your old and your new computers to the network at the same time. If you can't connect both computers to your home network, connect a null modem serial cable (available at most electronics stores) to the serial ports on both computers.
    There are three phases to transferring files and settings between an old and a new computer using your network or a cable:
    •Prepare your new computer.
    •Run the Files and Settings Transfer Wizard on your old computer.
    •Complete the Files and Settings Transfer Wizard on your new computer.
    This article walks you through each of these three phases. The entire process should take about an hour.
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    Transfer files and settings using a shared folder or external hard disk drive

    If you are reinstalling Windows XP on a single computer, or if you can't run your old and new computers at the same time, you can use the Files and Settings Transfer Wizard to store your information on an external hard disk drive or in a shared folder on your home network.
    There are two phases to transferring files and settings between an old and a new computer using a shared folder or removable media:
    •Run the Files and Settings Transfer Wizard on your old computer to create a backup of your files and settings.
    •Run the Files and Settings Transfer Wizard on your new computer to restore your old documents to your new computer.
    This article walks you through each of these phases. The entire process should take about an hour.
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    Transfer files and settings across a network or cable

    Prepare your new computer

    If you have a home network, connect both your old and new computers to the network. Then log on to your new computer as an administrator. After you have done that:
    1.
    Install any programs you use on your old computer.
    2.
    Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Accessories, point to System Tools, and then click Files and Settings Transfer Wizard.
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    3.
    The Files and Settings Transfer Wizard appears. Click Next.
    [​IMG]
    4.
    On the Which computer is this? page, click New computer. Then, click Next.
    [​IMG]
    5.
    On the Do you have a Windows XP CD? page, you can create a Wizard Disk if you do not have the Windows XP CD available. If you have the Windows XP CD, click I will use the wizard from the Windows XP CD, click Next, and skip to the section Run the Files and Settings Transfer Wizard on your old computer. Otherwise, continue with the next step.
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    6.
    Connect the removable media (such as an external hard disk drive, a USB flash drive, a memory card from your digital camera, or any removable media large enough to store your files and settings) to your computer. Click I want to create a Wizard Disk in the following drive. Select the removable media, and then click Next.
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    7.
    When prompted, click the option that describes the operating system running on your old computer, and then click OK.
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    8.
    When prompted to insert the removable media, click OK.
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    9.
    The wizard displays the Now go to your old computer page. If you are transferring files across a network, skip to the section Run the Files and Settings Transfer Wizard on your old computer. If you are transferring files with a serial cable, click Next, and then continue with the next step.
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    10.
    On the Where are the files and settings? page, click Direct cable, and then click Next.
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    11.
    Connect your null modem serial cable to the serial ports on both your old and new computers. The serial ports are on the backs of the computers and have nine pins in two rows.
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    12.
    On the Set up your serial connection page, click Autodetect. Leave the wizard on this page while you continue the process from your old computer.
    [​IMG]

    Run the Files and Settings Transfer Wizard on your old computer

    To continue the process on your old computer
    1.
    Close any open programs.
    2.
    Launch the Files and Settings Transfer Wizard. If you created a Wizard Disk, connect the Wizard Disk to your old computer. Click the Start menu, click My Computer, double-click the Wizard Disk to display its contents, and double-click FASTWiz. Then, skip to step 6. If you did not create a Wizard Disk and have your Windows XP CD instead, continue with the next step.
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    3.
    Insert your Windows XP CD. If Windows XP Setup does not appear after 20 to 30 seconds, click the Start menu, click My Computer, right-click your CD drive, and then click AutoPlay.
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    4.
    The Welcome to Microsoft Windows XP page appears. Click Perform additional tasks.
    [​IMG]
    5.
    Click Transfer files and settings.
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    6.
    The Files and Settings Transfer Wizard appears. Click Next.
    [​IMG]
    7.
    On the Which computer is this? page, click Old computer. Then, click Next.
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    8.
    If you are alerted that the firewall is blocking the program, click Unblock.
    [​IMG]
    9.
    The wizard displays the Select a transfer method page. If you are transferring files across a network, click Home or small office network, click Next, and then skip to step 12. If you are transferring files with a serial cable, continue with the next step.
    [​IMG]
    10.
    On the Select a transfer method page, click Direct cable. Then click Next.
    [​IMG]
    11.
    On the Set up your serial connection page, click Autodetect. Then, click Next.
    [​IMG]
    12.
    On the What do you want to transfer? page, click Next.
    [​IMG]
    13.
    If the Install programs on your new computer page appears, click Next.
    [​IMG]
    14.
    The wizard will examine your old computer, which may take about an hour. You do not need to be present during this time. When it is finished, the Password dialog box will appear on your new computer, displaying a case-sensitive password. Type this password in the Password dialog box on your old computer. Then, click OK.
    [​IMG]
    15.
    The wizard will transfer your files and settings, which may take an hour. You do not need to be present during this time. When the transfer is complete, click Finish on the old computer.
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    Complete the Files and Settings Transfer Wizard

    To complete the transfer process on the new computer
    1.
    After the wizard transfers your files and settings, click Finish.
    [​IMG]
    2.
    When prompted, click Yes to log off. Then, log on again to access your newly transferred files and settings.
    [​IMG]
    You are done transferring your files and settings, and can use your new computer. You should shut down your old computer, but keep it available for at least two weeks in case you discover a file that was not transferred.

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    Transfer files and settings using a shared folder or external hard disk drive

    Run the Files and Settings Transfer Wizard on your old computer

    To run the Files and Settings Transfer Wizard on your old computer
    1.
    Log on to your old computer.
    2.
    Close any open programs.
    3.
    Insert your Windows XP CD into your CD drive. If Windows XP Setup does not appear within 20 to 30 seconds, click the Start menu, click My Computer, right-click your CD drive, and then click AutoPlay.
    [​IMG]
    4.
    The Welcome to Microsoft Windows XP page appears. Click Perform additional tasks.
    [​IMG]
    5.
    Click Transfer files and settings.
    [​IMG]
    6.
    The Files and Settings Transfer Wizard appears. Click Next.
    [​IMG]
    7.
    On the Which computer is this? page, click Old computer. Then, click Next.
    [​IMG]
    8.
    If you are alerted that the firewall is blocking the program, click Unblock.
    [​IMG]
    9.
    Connect the removable media (such as an external hard disk drive, a USB flash drive, a memory card from your digital camera, or any removable media large enough to store your files and settings) to your computer. On the Select a transfer method page, click Other. Click the Browse button to select your removable media, and then click OK. Click Next.
    [​IMG]
    10.
    On the What do you want to transfer? page, click Next.
    [​IMG]
    11.
    The wizard will back up your files and settings, which may take an hour. You do not need to be present during this time. When the backup is complete, click Finish.
    [​IMG]
    Now you can safely reinstall Windows XP. Then, continue the transfer process on the new computer.

    Run the Files and Settings Transfer Wizard on your new computer

    To run the Files and Setting Transfer Wizard on your new computer
    1.
    Log on to your new computer as an administrator.
    2.
    Install any programs that you used on your old computer.
    3.
    Click Start, point to All Programs, point to Accessories, point to System Tools, and then click Files and Settings Transfer Wizard.
    [​IMG]
    4.
    The Files and Settings Transfer Wizard appears. Click Next.
    [​IMG]
    5.
    On the Which computer is this? page, click New computer. Then, click Next.
    [​IMG]
    6.
    On the Do you have a Windows XP CD? page, click I don't need the Wizard Disk. Then, click Next.
    [​IMG]
    7.
    Connect the removable media to your computer. On the Where are the files and settings? page, click Other. Click the Browse button to select your removable media, and then click OK. Click Next.
    [​IMG]
    8.
    After the wizard transfers your files and settings, click Finish.
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    9.
    When prompted, click Yes to log off. Then, log on again to access your newly transferred files and settings.
    [​IMG]
    You are done transferring your files and settings, and can use your new computer.
     
  4. MziziMkavu

    MziziMkavu JF-Expert Member

    #4
    Apr 17, 2010
    Joined: Feb 3, 2009
    Messages: 38,540
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    Create and customize user accounts



    Do you have more than one person using your home computer? If you do, you can create user accounts for everyone in your home so that they can set up Windows XP with unique favorites, colors, wallpaper, and private files. You can even create a guest account for visitors to use.
    •Create a user account for each person who uses your computer.
    •Change the default display pictures or add passwords for the accounts.
    •After you have set up the user accounts, you can show everyone who uses your computer how to switch between user accounts.
    How to add user accounts

    To set up user accounts
    1.
    Log on to your computer as an administrator. Click Start, and then click Control Panel.
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    2.
    Under Pick a category, click User Accounts.
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    3.
    Under Pick a task, click Create a new account.
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    4.
    In the User Accounts wizard, on the Name the new account page, type the name for the user. You can use the person's full name, first name, or a nickname. Then click Next.
    [​IMG]
    5.
    The User Accounts wizard displays the Pick an account type page. Click Limited, and then click Create Account.
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    6.
    To create another account, return to step 3.
    Note: In these steps, you created a limited account. Limited accounts offer better security than Computer administrator accounts. However, limited accounts cannot make system-wide changes or install some applications. If you need to make changes to your system, log on with the administrator account you used to create the new accounts.
    Now that you have added new user accounts, you can change the default display pictures or create passwords for the accounts.

    [​IMG]Top of page
    How to choose pictures or create passwords for user accounts

    By default, accounts have standard pictures but do not have passwords. You can add your own picture for each account, which can make it easier and more fun for children-and adults-to identify their accounts. To prevent other users from accessing an account, create a password.
    To either choose a picture or create a password
    1.
    Log on to your computer as an administrator. Click Start, and then click Control Panel.
    [​IMG]
    2.
    Under Pick a category, click User Accounts.
    [​IMG]
    3.
    Under or pick an account to change, click the account for which you want to choose a picture or create a password.
    [​IMG]
    4.
    To choose a custom picture
    •a. Click Change the picture.
    [​IMG]
    •b. Click Browse for more pictures.
    [​IMG]
    •c. Click the picture you want to display for that account, and then click Open. Windows XP will display the picture you select on the logon screen.
    [​IMG]
    5.
    To create a password to prevent other people from using an account
    •a. Click Create a password.
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    •b. On the Create a password page, type the password twice. Optionally, type a password hint. Then click Create Password.
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    6.
    To choose pictures or create passwords for other accounts, return to step 3.
    Now that you have set up accounts, you can show everyone who uses your computer how to switch between user accounts.


    [​IMG]Top of page
     
  5. MziziMkavu

    MziziMkavu JF-Expert Member

    #5
    Apr 17, 2010
    Joined: Feb 3, 2009
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    How to switch between users



    Once you add a computer to your household, you might feel like one PC is not enough. Your kids might change the desktop to a wild color, and your Internet Explorer Favorites might get confused with everyone else's. You might even have some personal or financial files that you don't want others in the house to access.
    Good news-you don't necessarily need to buy a new computer. Just set up user accounts for everyone in your home and log on with your own user account each time you use the computer. When you log on to your account, Microsoft Windows XP will look the way you want it to look. And Windows XP will keep your files in a location that is separate from files in other user accounts.
    Note: If your computer is joined to an Active Directory directory service, the Fast Users Switching feature will be disabled. This change is commonly made to computers used for business. In fact, the change happens automatically when a computer joins an Active Directory domain. However, disabling the Fast Users Switching feature is not the default setting. Almost all computers in home environments will have Fast User Switching enabled.
    To switch between user accounts
    1.
    Click Start, and then click Log Off.
    Note: You can leave programs running, and they will still be open the next time someone uses this account.
    [​IMG]
    2.
    On the Log Off Windows dialog box, click Switch User.
    [​IMG]
    3.
    Click your account name. If you set up your account with a password, type the password, and then click the green arrow button.
    [​IMG]
    When you log on, Windows XP displays your desktop and any programs you left running. Spend a few minutes showing everyone in your household how to switch to their own accounts, and sharing a computer will be much easier on everyone. Having multiple users might not stop your kids from fighting over whose turn it is to use the computer, but at least they can each have their own settings and separate locations for their files. This feature can help them at least feel like they have their own PCs.
     
  6. MziziMkavu

    MziziMkavu JF-Expert Member

    #6
    Apr 17, 2010
    Joined: Feb 3, 2009
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    Use Windows XP to join a network



    The networking capability of Windows XP is one of your computer's most important accessories because it gives you access to the Internet and e-mail. If you have more than one computer, you can also create a network to share files and printers between your computers. If you connect a Media Center Extender device (such as an Xbox 360) to your network, you can use your TV to listen to music or watch videos stored on your computer.
    There are two types of networks:
    •Wired networks
    If you use a desktop computer in the same room as your Digital Subscriber Line (DSL) or cable modem, router, or network hub, you should connect your computer to other computers or the Internet using a wired network.
    •Wireless networks
    If you have a portable computer, or you want to use a desktop computer in a different room from your DSL or cable modem, it's easiest to connect your computer using a wireless network rather than run cables through your home or office.
    How to join a wired network

    Wired networks, also commonly known as Ethernet networks, are the easiest and most reliable way to connect your computer to a network. Windows XP automatically configures wired networks, and all you need to do is connect your computer to your network equipment using a network cable.
    Aside from a computer and Internet service, you'll need the following equipment (usually provided by your Internet service provider) to join a wired network and connect to the Internet:
    •A DSL modem, a cable modem, or a router
    •An Ethernet cable
    If your modem or router is not already connected to your external Internet connection, your Internet service provider should set it up for you.
    To connect your computer to the network after the modem is in place
    1.
    Click Start, click Turn Off Computer, and then click Turn Off to shut down your computer.
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    2.
    Connect your Ethernet cable to your DSL or cable modem using any port that is not labeled WAN (wide area network) or Internet.
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    3.
    Connect the other end of your Ethernet cable to the Ethernet port on the back of your computer.
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    4.
    Start your computer and log on. Windows XP will automatically connect to your network.
    To verify the connection, launch Internet Explorer and attempt to connect to the Internet. If you cannot access the Internet, contact your Internet service provider for assistance.

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    How to join a wireless network

    Wireless networks, also known as Wi-Fi or 802.11 networks, enable you to connect to a network from any room in your house. Wireless networks can be difficult to configure. For best results, follow the instructions provided with your wireless network equipment, and contact your wireless network equipment support center if you need assistance.
    To join a wireless network, you need the following equipment:
    •A wireless access point or wireless router
    •A computer with built-in wireless networking support or a wireless network adapter
    To join a wireless network
    1.
    Configure your wireless access point or wireless router and write down your network name and network key.
    Note: If your wireless access point supports Windows Connect Now, follow the steps in the article Easily add to your existing wireless network, or go wireless for the first time.
    2.
    Plug your network adapter into your Universal Serial Bus (USB) port and place the antennae on top of your computer (in the case of a desktop computer) or insert the network adapter into an empty PC Card slot (in the case of a laptop). Windows XP will automatically detect the new adapter and might prompt you to insert the CD that came with your adapter. The on-screen instructions will guide you through the configuration process.
    Note: If your computer has built-in wireless network support, you can skip step 2.
    [​IMG]
    3.
    Windows XP will display an icon with a notification that says it has found a wireless network. Right-click the Wireless network icon in the lower right corner of your screen. Under Network Tasks, select View available wireless networks.
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    4.
    The Wireless Network Connection window will appear, and you should see your wireless network listed with the network name you chose. Select your network, and then click Connect in the lower right-hand corner.
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    5.
    If your network is encrypted, Windows XP will prompt you to enter a key. In both the Network Key and Confirm Network Key boxes, type the encryption key that you wrote down, and then click Connect.
    [​IMG]
    6.
    Windows XP will show its progress as it connects to your network. After you're connected, you can close the Wireless Network Connection window. You're done!
    To verify the connection, launch Internet Explorer and attempt to connect to the Internet. If you experience problems joining your wireless network, or you cannot reach the Internet, read How to troubleshoot wireless network connections in Windows XP. If you cannot solve the problem, contact your wireless network equipment vendor for support
     
  7. MziziMkavu

    MziziMkavu JF-Expert Member

    #7
    Apr 17, 2010
    Joined: Feb 3, 2009
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    Set up Windows XP for multiple languages



    Windows XP supports more than 100 languages and dialects. Typically, you use one primary language on your computer. However, with Windows XP, you can set up multiple languages, and then switch between them with just two mouse clicks. A multiple-language setup is useful if you often send and receive documents in different languages. If your computer is used in a multilingual household, you can configure each user account with a different language.
    •Set up your computer for multiple languages
    To change the primary language or set up multiple languages on your computer, first you need to add your preferred languages.
    •Switch between languages
    To change the language on your computer, use the Language Bar.
    •After you have set up the user accounts, you can show everyone who uses your computer how to switch between user accounts.
    How to set up Windows XP for multiple languages

    To add languages
    1.
    Click Start, and then click Control Panel.
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    2.
    Click Date, Time, Language, and Regional Options.
    [​IMG]
    3.
    Click Add other languages.
    [​IMG]
    4.
    In the Regional and Language Options dialog box, on the Languages tab, click Details.
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    5.
    In the Text Services and Input Languages dialog box, on the Settings tab, click Add.
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    6.
    In the Add Input Language dialog box, click the Input language list and select your preferred language and dialect. If you want to change the standard keyboard layout, click the Keyboard layout/IME list and select a new keyboard layout. Then, click OK.
    [​IMG]
    7.
    In the Text Services and Input Languages dialog box, on the Settings tab, click the Default input language list, and select the language you will use most often. The language you select as the default will display when you first start your computer.
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    8.
    To add additional languages, go back to step 5.
    - or -
    If you have finished adding languages, click OK.
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    9.
    In the Regional and Language Options dialog box, if required, select the Install files for complex script and right-to-left languages and Install files for East Asian languages check boxes.
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    10.
    Click the Regional Options tab. Click the Standards and formats list, and then select your region.
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    11.
    Click the Location list, and then select your location
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    12.
    Click OK to save your settings.
    [​IMG]

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    How to switch between languages

    If more than one language is installed on your computer, Windows XP displays the Language Bar in the lower-right corner, near your system clock. The Language Bar shows the two-letter abbreviation for the language that is currently displayed.
    To switch between languages
    •Click the Language Bar button, and then select the language and dialect you want to use.
    [​IMG]
    Note: It may take up to a minute for the new language to appear.
     
  8. MziziMkavu

    MziziMkavu JF-Expert Member

    #8
    Apr 17, 2010
    Joined: Feb 3, 2009
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    Validate Windows XP



    After you've activated your copy of Windows XP, you can also validate Windows to gain access to hundreds of free downloads from the Microsoft Download Center. The Microsoft Download Center offers free tools to help keep your computer safe, upgrades that improve your favorite applications, trial versions of games, fun desktop themes, and creative programs such as Microsoft Photo Story.
    To validate your genuine copy of Windows and gain access to the Microsoft Download Center
    1.
    Open Microsoft Internet Explorer and go to the Windows Genuine Advantage Web page.
    2.
    Scroll down the page, and click Validate Now.
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    3.
    If the Internet Explorer dialog box appears, click Yes.
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    4.
    If the Information Bar dialog box appears, click OK.
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    5.
    Notice the Information Bar at the top of the Web page that says, "This site might require the following ActiveX control: 'Windows Genuine Advantage' from 'Microsoft Corporation.'" Click Information Bar, and then click Install ActiveX Control.
    [​IMG]
    6.
    In the Internet Explorer Security Warning dialog box, click Install.
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    7.
    Internet Explorer displays the Validation Complete Web page.
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    Now that you have validated your copy of Windows, you can download and run free software from the Microsoft Download Center and Microsoft Update. Both sites offer many great downloads that make Windows XP more fun, reliable, and secure.
    To learn more about validating Windows XP, read about the Windows Genuine Advantage program.
     
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