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Hivi nani anadhibiti ubora wa mbegu na madawa ya kilimo na mifugo

Discussion in 'Biashara, Uchumi na Ujasiriamali' started by mchafukuoga, Aug 2, 2011.

  1. m

    mchafukuoga Member

    #1
    Aug 2, 2011
    Joined: Apr 17, 2011
    Messages: 26
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    nilikuwa nataka kupunguza ukali wa maisha kwa kuanza kulima nyanya .
    nina kama feet 140*90 .
    nika panga kuzalisha miche 1000 tu ya nyanya,
    nikafanya mambo yote pamoja na kutibu udongo
    kwa kuyumia furadan,nikanunua dawa ya ukungu aina ya baylatone(kwa ajili ya ukungu)
    nikanunua thernder kwa ajili ya wadudu.

    NIKANUNUA MBEGU ZA KAMPUNI YA KIBO SEED ARUSHA ZA NYANYA AINA YA MWANGA.

    NINACHOKIONA SHAMBANI NI MIMEA INAKUWA KAMA IMEMWAGIWA MAJI YA MOTO.
    NINA JUMLA YA MIMEA KAMA 900 HIVI

    NIMEFANYA KILA KITU LAKINI WAPI
    NIKAENDA KUGOOGLE NIKAONA YAFUATAYO.
    [​IMG]Bacterial wilt strikes tomato plants with little warning. Bacterial wilt is a devastating garden disease, causing tomatoes and other nightshade vegetable plants to wilt and die suddenly and with very little warning. Bacterial wilt is nearly impossible to treat, but there are steps you can take to prevent its spread. Here¬ís what you need to know about bacterial wilt in the garden.
    [h=3]About Bacterial Wilt[/h] Bacterial wilt is a soil-borne disease caused by the bacteria Ralstonia solancearum. It targets primarily tomatoes but is also a problem for potatoes, peppers, eggplant, sweet potatoes, bananas, and many weeds (which act as hosts).
    [h=4]Bacterial wilt can be identified by:[/h]
    • [​IMG]
      Testing for bacterial wilt.
    • Warning signs: The plant may start to look wilted in the mornings but then perk up over the course of the day.
    • Sudden death: The entire plant can suddenly wilt and die in a matter of hours.
    • Stem rot: The stem may rot from the inside out, revealing a brown or hollow center.
    • Field test: To test to see if your plants have bacterial wilt, cut a chunk of the main stem, about 2-3 inches long. Suspend it in a glass of water. Within a few minutes, you should see milky white bacteria flowing out of the stem.
    [h=4]Bacterial wilt may be encouraged by:[/h]
    • Injured plants, since the bacteria enters the roots through wounds caused by cultivation, improper planting, and nematodes or other root-feeding critters in the soil.
    • Poorly draining, infertile, or heavy clay soil.
    • Acidic soil.
    • Hot, humid or rainy conditions.
    • Soil infected with the bacteria. Bacterial wilt can live for years in soil without a host plant present.
    • Water runoff that spreads the bacteria.
    • Weeds that can act as hosts to the bacteria without showing symptoms of bacterial wilt.
    • Infected tools, transplants, and imported soil
    • .HALI MBAYA SANA WATAALAM WATUSAIDIE