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Hivi FIFA wanafanya kazi kwa maslahi ya nani????

Discussion in 'Sports' started by Abdulhalim, Jun 29, 2010.

  1. Abdulhalim

    Abdulhalim JF-Expert Member

    #1
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    Najiuliza hili swali maana naona kama sielewielewi.

    Hawa jamaa baada ya marefa kuboronga kwenye mashindano muhimu kuliko yote duniani kwa maamuzi tatanishi ambayo yangeweza kutatuliwa kwa urahisi kabisa kwa a little push on use of replays au mpira wenye sensor, wadau mbalimbali wakatoa kilio chao kushinikiza matumizi ya tecknolojia.Lakini maafisa wa FIFA wametoa kauli ambazo zimenifanya nijiulize hawa jamaa wanafanya kazi kwa maslahi ya nani...?

    Kama wadau wote duniani wanataka matumizi ya technology kumsaidia refa kutoa maamuzi sahihi, wao kwanini wapinge kwa asilimia 100? Kwanini ka kikundi kadogo ka watu kafanye maamuzi ambayo dunia nzima haiyaafiki?

    Hawa jamaa hawashirikiani na MAFIA kweli kwene kupanga matokeo??
     
  2. Abdulhalim

    Abdulhalim JF-Expert Member

    #2
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    Another twist,

     
  3. Abdulhalim

    Abdulhalim JF-Expert Member

    #3
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    Hii mijamaa ni mijinga sana aisee, sijapata kuona.
     
  4. doup

    doup JF-Expert Member

    #4
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    Mbona mipira wanabadilisha karibu kila mashindano kupata mpira bora;kama

    [ Telstar 1970 ]
    [ Durlast 1974 ]
    [ Tango 1978 ]
    [ Tango 1982 ]
    [ Azteca 1986 ]
    [ Etrvsco 1990 ]
    [ Questra 1994 ]
    [ Tricolore 1998 ]
    [ Fevernova 02-03 ]
    [ Teamgeist 2006 ]
    [ Jabulani 2010 ]

    kwanini wasiendelee kutumia gozi la ng'ombe originokutoka umasaini/usukumani
    nadhani umefika wakati wa kutumia technology kuondoa utata; usio wa razima katika magori na Kadi
     
  5. Abdulhalim

    Abdulhalim JF-Expert Member

    #5
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    Si ndio mi nashangaa? Hawa jamaa itakuwa si bure. Kwanini wakatae katakata matumizi ya technology?
     
  6. Belo

    Belo JF-Expert Member

    #6
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    Nasikia Blatter ameomba msamaha kwa FA
     
  7. ngoshwe

    ngoshwe JF-Expert Member

    #7
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    Apologetic Blatter to re-think technology


















    JOHANNESBURG (Reuters) - FIFA president Sepp Blatter apologised Tuesday for the refereeing mistakes that have blighted the World Cup and said soccer's governing body would look again at introducing goalline technology.
    Sports

    "It is obvious that after the experiences so far at this World Cup it would be a nonsense not to re-open the file on goalline technology," Blatter said at a briefing with selected media Tuesday.

    "We cannot change anything with 10 games to go in the World Cup, but we will look again at technology, goalline technology, at the business meeting of the (law-making) International Football Association Board in Cardiff, Wales in July."
    England and Mexico were the victims of blatant mistakes in their second round matches Sunday and Blatter said he had spoken to representatives of the two teams to express his regret.

    "I have apologised to the two delegations," Blatter said on Tuesday.

    He added: "I deplore when you see the evident referees' mistakes. It has not been a five-star game for referees. I am distressed by the evident referees' mistakes. I have expressed my apologies."

    Blatter made clear his personal opposition to the use of goalline technology or video replays to help decide on marginal calls after the International Board, the sport's lawmaking body, voted against its introduction in March.

    "The game must be played in the same way no matter where you are in the world," Blatter said in a statement on FIFA's website (FIFA.com - Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA)) at the time. "The simplicity and universality of the game is one of the reasons for its success.
    "No matter which technology is applied, at the end of the day a decision will have to be taken by a human being. This being the case, why remove the responsibility from the referee to give it to someone else?"

    The decision taken by IFAB in March was just the latest rejection of technology in soccer.
    FIFA have examined various technology systems using either cameras or a chip in the ball for years. After experiments in junior competitions the systems were rejected as FIFA decided none was 100 per cent accurate.

    TWIN MISTAKES

    Blatter's re-think comes after two important decisions at World Cup matches in South Africa Sunday were shown by instant replays to be incorrect.
    First, a shot from England midfielder Frank Lampard clattered against Germany's crossbar and bounced down well over the line when England, chasing a comeback, were 2-1 down.

    The goal was not given and Germany went on to win the second round match 4-1.
    In the later game, Mexico had been enjoying the better of the game against Argentina when Carlos Tevez opened the scoring from a clearly offside position, setting Diego Maradona's side on their way to a 3-1 win.

    The twin mistakes highlighted the fact that soccer has become isolated, with other major international sports using video replays or infrared systems to decide on close calls or to track the ball.
     
  8. ngoshwe

    ngoshwe JF-Expert Member

    #8
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    FIFA in firing line after phantom goal


    When football's lawmakers ditched the idea of goal-line technology once and for all just over three months ago, FIFA general secretary Jerome Valcke said he hoped the decision would not come back to haunt the organisation at the World Cup.



    FIFA have rejected goal-line technology


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    • Gallery [​IMG]

    "Questions will always come, we just hope they will not come in the World Cup," said Valcke at the time. What must he and his colleagues be thinking now?
    Anyone who knows anything about the vagaries of football will recognise that England might still have lost heavily to Germany on Sunday had Frank Lampard's 'goal' been allowed to stand by the Uruguayan referee.
    But it was the mother of all howlers and FIFA and all those who oppose goal-line technology in favour of persisting with the tired argument that human error is part of the game now need to stand up and be counted.
    Millions of fans watching the Germany-England game across the world will have been doing so, not out of a keen sense of loyalty to either team, but because this is the World Cup, the one tournament that sucks in neutrals and non-sports fans alike to showcase the game at the highest level.
    Many will have known that in tennis, cricket and even rugby, wrong decisions are re-examined so that justice is seen to be done. Not, it seems, in football.
    Lampard's disallowed strike in Bloemfontein would have brought the score back to 2-2 and given England a massive psychological boost; of that there is no doubt. Of more doubt, sadly, is whether FIFA will at last take the plunge and accept that some decisions bring the game into disrepute - an accusation so often levelled at players and coaches.
    Valcke's inauspicious remark back in March followed the International Football Association Board (IFAB) meeting in Zurich when a handful of self-interested traditionalists were too afraid to take responsibility to push football into the 21st Century.
    It had been widely anticipated that after years of intense but fruitless debate, the IFAB would finally give the green light to offer referees scientific help when making game-changing decisions.
    Instead, a majority of football's custodians voted 6-2 against both Hawk-Eye, used successfully in cricket and tennis, and a highly sophisticated microchipped ball system developed - irony upon irony - in Germany.
    Instead too, the IFAB - made up of FIFA plus the four home British associations - decided to consider pressing ahead with the more "human" experiment of two extra officials, trialled during this season's Europa League and the pet scheme of UEFA president Michel Platini.
    Siding with FIFA against technology were the Welsh and Northern Irish, two federations who don't even have a full professional league yet. England and Scotland, who have long embraced the idea of technology, were scandalously outvoted.
    Year after year, Hawk-Eye and Cairos, a German firm owned by Adidas - rivals in business but united in the cause of technology - had been invited to the IFAB to present their findings. And year after year they were sent away to fine-tune their product with every encouragement that they were on the right track to solving one of football's greatest injustices. What, one might ask now, was the point?

    [​IMG]
    GettyImagesFrank Lampard reacts to the decision not to allow his effort.



    "I don't understand why they invited us out there to start with if they never wanted technology at all," said Paul Hawkins, managing director of Hawk-Eye. "The technology works but their process for decision-making is totally unrepresentative of football. I doubt there is any issue in football that is so unanimous."
    After Sunday's debacle, you can say that again.
    Even more frustrating has been FIFA's decision not to use their 'two extra officials' idea in South Africa. You may not agree that two additional pairs of eyes are an acceptable substitute for virtually foolproof technology but at least it's something.
    An extra official behind Manuel Neuer's goal would surely have flagged up the fact that Lampard's sublime effort was well over the line. Frustratingly for neutral fans everywhere, not even that luxury was afforded to Fabio Capello's team.
    Don't get me wrong, England were well beaten in the end. But they might not have been. If there is one lesson to be learned from Sunday - apart from English teams not giving opponents two-goal starts before they begin playing - is that something has to be done, and soon, to bring in some kind of rule that prevents the kind of officiating disgrace, however innocent, that occurred in Bloemfontein. A kind, crucially, that played a big part in eliminating one team and helping the other advance.
    If that means two extra officials, one behind each goal, in all future major competitions, so be it. Better than nothing - but too late for England.

    [​IMG]
     
  9. RRONDO

    RRONDO JF-Expert Member

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    sasa hivi naona hawana jinsi watakubali tu teknolojia iwasaidie marefa,blatter ni mbishi sana haswa kwa big nation kama england hataki kabisa wamburuze kwa chochote.
     
  10. BAK

    BAK JF-Expert Member

    #10
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    Miye nilishasema hawa FIFA officials watajibaraguza tu lakini hawana jinsi instant replay lazima itaruhusiwa tu kama siyo mwaka huu basi mwaka kesho. Haiwezekani waendelee kuweka ngumu kwa kitu ambacho kimepigiwa kelele na wachezaji wa sasa, zamani, makocha na wapenzi na washabiki wengi duniani. Huwezi kung'ang'ania kubaki katika mwaka 47 huku malalamiko dhidi ya wamuzi yakizidi kuongezeka siku hadi siku na kuna technology ambayo inaweza kabisa kumaliza tatizo hilo.
     
  11. Charles Mtekateka

    Charles Mtekateka Verified User

    #11
    Jun 29, 2010
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    ok,sawa kwa matumizi ya tekenolojia ,je mataifa maskini na jamii maskini zitaweza au?
     
  12. Abdulhalim

    Abdulhalim JF-Expert Member

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    Hiyo itakua ku-ask too much, kwa nchi maskini au mashindano ya ndani kwetu sisi sioni kama ni practical.
     
  13. Abdulhalim

    Abdulhalim JF-Expert Member

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    Of course siku hizi watu hawawezi kuburuzwa, wakiona uzushi wa FIFA unazidi wanaeza wakaanzisha mashindano yao kivyao...FIFA wakabaki mikono mitupu. Nani ataweka udhaimini wa mabilioni kwene mashindano ambayo magoli dhahiri yanakataliwa??
     
  14. BAK

    BAK JF-Expert Member

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    Kwani tunajua gharama ya hiyo technology ni kiasi gani? Mpira una wapenzi wengi na unaingiza pesa nyingi sana katika nchi mbali mbali duniani hivyo sidhani kama gharama itakuwa ni kikwazo cha nchi yoyote ile. Pale ambapo gharama itakuwa ni kikwazo basi itafutwe njia muafaka kama vile kuweka extra officials katika kusaidia kutoa maamuzi ambayo ni halali.
     
  15. BAK

    BAK JF-Expert Member

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    Hilo pia mimi nilifikiria. Kwa mfano FA wakiamua kuanza kutumia technology katika EPL msimu ujao basi FIFA watakuwa wamepigwa bao, hawana jinsi hawa lazima waruhusu tu instant replay.
     
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