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Former Black Panther explains his exile in Tanzania

Discussion in 'International Forum' started by Ab-Titchaz, Jan 31, 2012.

  1. Ab-Titchaz

    Ab-Titchaz Content Manager Staff Member

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    Former Black Panther patches together purpose in Africa exile



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    Many of the young orphans gather round to watch, and lend their support, as Pete O'Neal has fresh ink applied to his fading black panther tattoo. (Barbara Davidson / Los Angeles Times)


    By Christopher Goffard, Los Angeles Times
    January 29, 2012



    In America, Pete O'Neal was an angry man, an ex-con who found a kind of religion in 1960s black nationalism. In a Tanzania village, he's been a champion of children.

    Reporting from Imbaseni, Tanzania -- The fugitive shuffles to his computer and begins typing out his will. He is about to turn 71, and it is time. "My life," he writes, "has been a wild and wicked ride...."

    All Pete O'Neal has amassed fits on two pages: A small brick home with a sheet-metal roof. A few road-beaten vehicles. A cluster ofbunkhouses and classrooms he spent decades building, brick by scavenged brick, near the slopes of Mt. Meru's volcanic cone. Everything will go to his wife of 42 years, Charlotte, and to a few trusted workers.

    He prints out the will late one Saturday morning and settles into his reclining chair to check the spelling. He signs his name. Then, to guarantee its authenticity, he finds an ink pad, rolls his thumb across it, and affixes his thumbprint to the bottom of the page.

    "I think that'll do it," he says.



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    When last he walked America's streets, O'Neal was a magnetic young man possessed of bottomless anger. He was an ex-con who'd found a kind of religion inlate-'60sblack nationalism, a vain, violent street hustler reborn in a Black Panther uniform of dark sunglasses, beret and leather jacket. With pitiless, knife-sharp diction, he spoke of sending police to their graves.

    This morning,he sits in his living room uncapping medicine bottles. A pill for high blood pressure. Another for the pain in his back and his bad knee. An aspirin to thin his blood. Time is catching him, like the lions that pursue him implacably through his nightmares, their leashes held by policemen.

    He pushes through his screen door into the brisk morning air. A slightly stooped, thickset man with long, graying dreadlocks, he moves unsteadily down the irregular stone steps he built into the sloping dirt. He makes his way past the enormous avocado tree, past the horse barn with its single slow-footed tenant, Bullet, past the shaded dining pavilion.

    His four-acre compound bustles with visitors, many of them preparing for a memorial service for Geronimo Pratt, a former Panther who died in his farmhouse down the road, his affairs untidy, his will unfinished, his death a sharp message to O'Neal not to put off the paperwork any longer.

    Most of O'Neal's big dreams have faded over the years, or come to feel silly. Like beating the 42-year-old federal gun charges that caused him to flee the United States. Like the global socialist revolution that he was supposed to help lead. Like returning home to the streets of his Midwestern childhood. Like winning citizenship in his adopted African country, and the prize that's eluded him on two continents: the feeling of belonging somewhere.

    This is what's left: the shell of a 20-year-old Toyota Coaster bus that bulks before him in a clearing. It's a stripped-and-gutted 29-seater that he bought for $11,500 after years of squirreling away money. It came with dents, a cracked windshield, a peeling paint job, rotting floorboards, frayed seats.

    Still, it seemed like a good deal until he found the engine had to be replaced, costing an additional $4,000. He's hired mechanics and craftsmen to rebuild the busnearly from the chassis up, and a few of them are milling around now, informing him in Swahili of their progress.

    He rarely leaves home anymore. Crowds jangle his nerves; traffic makes his hands shake. Yet nothing feels more urgent than readying this bus for an improbable 300-mile trip to the edge of his adopted continent.

    http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/world/la-fg-black-panther-20120129-html,0,2641122.htmlstory
     
  2. P

    Petu Hapa JF-Expert Member

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    nilimuona wakati nakua na mkewe nadhani anaitwa patricia. Nakumbuka kwende nyumbani kwao na kujifunza historia ya mapambano ya watu weusi wa marekani! nadhani bado wanaendeleza hilo
     
  3. Ab-Titchaz

    Ab-Titchaz Content Manager Staff Member

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    Pete O'Neal listens to a story by one of the young orphans living in his compound, Joshua Emmanuel, 6. If exile saved O'Neal, it has also meant a life in which the sense of being a stranger never goes away. "There's always a feeling of not being completely part of this culture. I know I am of a different tribe," he says. "People like me here, they love me, but I'm always other than.


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    A wall surrounding O'neal's compound has a memorial of Elmar "Geronimo" Pratt, a former Black Panther field marshal who spent decades behind bars on a murder conviction before a California judge reversed it. Pratt, who died last year, had moved to Tanzania and bought a farm near O'Neal's home.


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    Pete O'neal shadow boxes with Kayode Jaga, 8, the son of his deceased friend friend Elmer "Geronimo" Pratt on the eve of a memorial for Pratt. In 2002, Pratt bought a big farmhouse nearby with his false-imprisonment settlement and O'Neal felt as though he'd rediscovered a lost brother.

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    Pete O'neal enjoys an evening of laughter with his orphans and two volunteer English teachers, Zack and Kelsey, in his bedroom in the Tanzanian compound. The orphans call him Babu, or Grandfather.




     
  4. Ab-Titchaz

    Ab-Titchaz Content Manager Staff Member

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  5. Ab-Titchaz

    Ab-Titchaz Content Manager Staff Member

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    Mkewe anaitwa Charlotte kwa mujibu wa hii picha....

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    Amid the prayers and the singing and the tribute, Charlotte O'Neal, Pete's wife, raises a toast skyward in honor of their late good friend Elmer "Geronimo" Pratt.
     
  6. Ab-Titchaz

    Ab-Titchaz Content Manager Staff Member

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    Elmer Geronimo' Pratt's 8-yr old son Kayode Jaga joins others in planting a memorial tree in honor of his late father. The boy and his mother traveled from the United States to Tanzania to attend the memorial service.



     
  7. Puppy

    Puppy JF-Expert Member

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    Huyu jamaa na mkewe ni wa ukweli sana, wamesaidia wengi saaaaana sana kuanzia wasanii mpaka kijiji cha imbaseni na maji ya chai. Anafundisha computer, Lugha na sanaa bure.
    Watu kama Nakaaya Na J.C.B na wasanii wengine wengine wa Arusha wamepita mikononi mwake.
     
  8. Ab-Titchaz

    Ab-Titchaz Content Manager Staff Member

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    Swali langu ni Je serikali inamtambua huyu bwana kwa kazi yake anayofanya?...Ni iwapo ndio, ingekua poa sana kama
    wangemsaidia na hilo basi lake jamani.

    The man is assisting orphans in a big way and he needs assistance!
     
  9. Puppy

    Puppy JF-Expert Member

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    Sidhani kama wanatambua, kuna kipindi jamaa alitoa gari iwe inawashusha wanakijiji toka huko juu milimani kuwaleta lami kwenye usafiri wa kawaida waende kwenye shughuli zao na inawarudisha pia.
    Amepeleka njee wanafunzi wengi wenye vipaji.
     
  10. Yo Yo

    Yo Yo JF-Expert Member

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    anapata wapi pesa?
     
  11. Ab-Titchaz

    Ab-Titchaz Content Manager Staff Member

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    Mkuu,

    ukipata mda, tumbukiza macho katika hii link... Tanzania takes the edge off an old Black Panther - CSMonitor.com

    Kujibu swali lako, I cannot say the actual source of his funds but I believe he gets donations and also through working the land that he is on. This quote in the above article sheds some light:

    It's the hard life in Tanzania that took the edge out of his attitude, he says. "I came here with practically no money," he explains. "We had to learn how to work, how to farm, how to support ourselves. Here you either work or you fall through the cracks – Tanzania gives no quarter."

    Pete O'Neal.


     
  12. Ab-Titchaz

    Ab-Titchaz Content Manager Staff Member

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    Pete O'Neal is overseeing the refurbishing of a 29-seat bus. The dents are repaired, the chassis rebuilt, the engine replaced. One day soon, he hopes to take the children southeast across Tanzania to the Swahili Coast, with its coral reefs and pale sand and bright painted old dhows.

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  13. Yo Yo

    Yo Yo JF-Expert Member

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    jamaa mkali aisee.....huyu jamaa sijui ilikuwaje akachagua kukimbilia tz....
     
  14. Ab-Titchaz

    Ab-Titchaz Content Manager Staff Member

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    [​IMG]

    Unajua kuna kile kipindi cha kupigania civil rights marekani and the racist policies of the government of the day. Jamaa akawa
    anashtakiwa kwa ku-cross statelines na silaha...ambayo ni federal offence yenye kifungo cha mvua kadhaa. Jamaa akaona soo na
    akakimbilia Sweden kwa kipindi fulani. Kisha baaadae 'Black Panther' wakafungua ofisi Algiers with the hope of opening more branches
    across Africa lakini historia haikua kama jamaa alivyodhamiria. Times changed and dreams collapsed na jamaa akawa hana budi but
    to re-invent himself maana angerudi Marekani badi si unajua jela ilikua inamsubiri.

    Basi kwa wakati huo pia Nyerere alikua anasaidia harakati za ukombozi kila mahali Africa na hata in the diaspora. Kwa hivyo wakampa
    jamaa hifadhi bora tu 'asilete fujo'. Marekani hawangeweza kumgusa hadi hii leo. Sijui kama policies za serikali ya JK zimekaa vipi
    kuhusu swala la huyu bwana. Pia nadhani wamarekani wameonelea isiwe taabu maana the charge did not even involve killing
    somebody or anything serious like that.

    Mtazamo wangu.
     
  15. J

    Jasusi JF-Expert Member

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    Yoyo,"
    Enzi za Black Panther na Julius Nyerere Tanzania was the promised land.
     
  16. Tulizo

    Tulizo JF-Expert Member

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    Huhitaji hela nyingi kufanya hivyo jamaa anavyofanya...Ni maisha ya kawaida sana ila yenye kutia moyo labda tu kama angekuwa anawafundisha watoto kuwa magaidi ..lakini sivyo hivyo... anasema kwa vitendo yaliyopita yamepita na sasa ni upendo kwa wote..
     
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