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Follow the Islamic way to save the world,' Prince Charles urges environmentalists

Discussion in 'International Forum' started by kwamwewe, Jan 16, 2012.

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    kwamwewe JF-Expert Member

    Jan 16, 2012
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    [h=1][/h] By Rebecca English

    Prince Charles yesterday urged the world to follow Islamic 'spiritual principles' in order to protect the environment.
    In an hour-long speech, the heir to the throne argued that man's destruction of the world was contrary to the scriptures of all religions - but particularly those of Islam.
    He said the current 'division' between man and nature had been caused not just by industrialisation, but also by our attitude to the environment - which goes against the grain of 'sacred traditions'.


    Outspoken: Prince Charles speaks to Islamic studies scholars at Oxford. He argued that man's destruction of the world was particularly contrary to Islam

    Charles, who is a practising Christian and will become the head of the Church of England when he succeeds to the throne, spoke in depth about his own study of the Koran which, he said, tells its followers that there is 'no separation between man and nature' and says we must always live within our environment's limits.
    The prince was speaking to an audience of scholars at the Oxford Centre for Islamic Studies - which attempts to encourage a better understanding of the culture and civilisation of the religion.
    His speech, merging religion with his other favourite subject, the environment, marked the 25th anniversary of the organisation, of which he is patron.
    He added: 'The inconvenient truth is that we share this planet with the rest of creation for a very good reason - and that is, we cannot exist on our own without the intricately balanced web of life around us.
    'Islam has always taught this and to ignore that lesson is to default on our contract with creation.'


    Bored: Not everyone in the audience was as interested as Prince Charles though


    Impressive setting: Charles spoke at Oxford University's Sheldonian Theatre