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Divorce and Viagra blamed for soaring rate of sexually-transmitted diseases in over-4

Discussion in 'Mahusiano, mapenzi, urafiki' started by Babylon, Jul 25, 2009.

  1. Babylon

    Babylon JF-Expert Member

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    Divorce and Viagra blamed for soaring rate of sexually-transmitted diseases in over-45s


    By Laura Clark
    Last updated at 5:51 PM on 24th July 2009





    Divorce and the impotence drug Viagra are being blamed for a sharp rise in sexually-transmitted diseases among over-45s.
    Cases of chlamydia are rising faster among the middle-aged than any other group, new figures revealed yesterday.
    Experts say divorcees who are returning to the dating scene may not consider themselves at risk of infections and assume medical warnings about safe sex are aimed only at the young.

    [​IMG] Health burden: Cases of Chlamydia, which is common in young women, rose in 2008, the Health Protection Agency has reported



    The growth of anti-impotence drugs such as Viagra, Levitra and Cialis are also said to be increasing sexual activity.
    It means that while cases of several infections are increasing among all age groups, they are rising particularly sharply among the over-45s.
    Cases of chlamydia among the 45-64s have risen six per cent in a year, with 2,662 new diagnoses last year.
    Over the last five years, the number of new cases has risen 50 per cent among those aged 45 and above.
    And over the same period, cases of herpes diagnosed by GUM (genito-urinary medicine) clinics have risen 80 per cent to 2,093 while syphilis has gone up 40 per cent to 544.
    The number of new diagnoses of genital warts among those aged 45 and over has shot up 33 per cent to 5,198.
    Figures show that around two in five marriages end in divorce - the highest rate in Europe.
    Dr Christian Jessen, the sexual health expert and TV doctor who is also director of the Better2Know clinics chain, said: 'STIs are most commonly associated with younger age groups, however these results show that it is the over 45s where STI incidence is increasing most significantly.
    'Older people are continuing to be sexually active much later in life, both due to the medical treatments available and the reduced social stigma around having sex later in life.
    'However, there seems to be a naivety about their risk of sexual infection, as they are no longer concerned about the risk of pregnancy and do not feel contraception is necessary.
    'Further education and effective testing and treatment are vital across all age brackets.'



    Norman Wells, of Family and Youth Concern, said the trend 'underlines the fact that separating sex from marriage can have serious health consequences for people of any age'.
    A poll by the Royal Pharmaceutical Society found that nearly a fifth of those aged 45 to 54 had had unprotected sex with someone other than a long-term partner in the last five years.
    Many did not use contraception and believed their chances of picking up an infection were 'next to nothing'.
    The figures, from the Health Protection Agency, also show that younger age groups are still significantly more likely to suffer from sexually transmitted infections (STIs).
    The overall number of new chlamydia cases has risen from 121,791 in 2007 to 123,018 in 2008 despite a Government campaign to stem the spread of it.
    In 2006, the incidence stood at 113,713 in 2006.
    Genital wart infections also rose, by three per cent to 92,525 in 2008, up from 89,515 in 2007 and 83,616 in 2006.
    And cases of genital herpes grew by 10 per cent, with 28,957 cases in 2008, compared with 26,270 in 2007 and 21,877 in 2006.
    There were declines in the number of new gonorrhoea and syphilis infections.
    The figures are certain to raise fresh questions over the Government's strategy for tackling STIs and teenage pregnancies with more widespread sex education and accessibility to contraception.
    Critics claim the measures risk fuelling promiscuity.
    Dr Gwenda Hughes, head of the Health Protection Agency's sexually transmitted infections department, said: 'While the increase in genital herpes diagnoses in the last few years is probably due to greater use of highly sensitive tests detecting more cases, our data clearly show that considerable numbers of people, especially those under 25, are getting infected with an STI.
    'Early detection is vital for both men and women as some infections, particularly chlamydia, gonorrhoea and genital herpes, can often have no symptoms.'
     
  2. Sonara

    Sonara JF-Expert Member

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