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Cyril Ramaphosa: Je Tanzania tunao, na kama wapo ni wakina nani hawa?

Discussion in 'Jukwaa la Siasa' started by Kibanga Ampiga Mkoloni, Oct 28, 2012.

  1. Kibanga Ampiga Mkoloni

    Kibanga Ampiga Mkoloni JF-Expert Member

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    Amidst all the confusion after the shooting of 44 protesting miners at Lonmin’s Marikana platinum mine in South Africa, we should not lose sight of the astonishingly simple underlying issues.
    Report by Arthur McKay
    We are told the workers were demanding that their wage be raised to R12 500 per month (about US$1 500), but the workers claim their salary is already at this level. They say they are sub-contracted by a company owned by billionaire South African oligarch Cyril Ramaphosa.
    He only pays them R5 400 or less and pockets the rest paid out by Lonmin.
    If this is so, then agreeing to the workers’ demands would cost Lonmin nothing and the whole dispute is between the workers and Ramaphosa. Instead of saying this, however, Lonmin has placed itself between the two and taken responsibility for negotiating a pay rise which no one has asked for.
    Doing this, Lonmin is placing Ramaphosa’s private interests above those of its common stockholders and is neglecting its fiduciary duties. It is also leaving itself open to litigation.
    Ramaphosa, in fact, owns 9% of Lonmin but was paid out US$304m in cash by the company in 2010 in a deal backed ultimately by Xstrata.
    By comparison common shareholders have received only US$60m in dividends in the last two years and have incurred over US$2,5bn of paper losses. What the workers are requesting is that Ramaphosa share with them about US$18m which he is taking from their wages.
    When Ramaphosa bought 50,03% of Lonmin’s Black Economic Empowerment partner Incwala Resources in 2010, Lonmin put up the US$304m in cash which he needed. Lonmin funded this with a share issue to which, according to Lonmin, Xstrata was the key subscriber. Since then a further US$51m of credit has been extended to Ramaphosa.
    Ramaphosa’s company also provides all of Lonmin’s welfare and training services and for this, he may have been paid at least US$50m in 2011 alone. Based on the worker’s demands and their living conditions, we can guess at how much of this reached its stated purpose. Companies linked to Ramaphosa were also paid advance dividends by Lonmin of US$20m in the last two years.
    All-in-all Lonmin seems to have paid Ramaphosa and his related companies well over US$400m since he bought into the company. This is about 25% of Lonmin’s current market value and is a very large amount for a man who was supposed to be doing the paying when he bought his stake.
    All this casts the Marikana conflict in a very different light to what we have heard so far.
    The dirt-poor Marikana workers, many from Lesotho, living in slums, wearing rags, are asking for an extra US$750 per month from one of the most powerful figures in the African National Congress (ANC) and one of the richest men in the world, and they are openly calling him an exploiter.
    Such a debacle, which calls into question not only Lonmin, Xstrata and Ramaphosa, but also the whole ANC hierarchy, the reality of the New South Africa and the credibility of the ANC’s many foreign supporters, not least those in the United States, helps to explain the speed and the savage brutality of the reaction.
    On August 16, six days into the strike, the police opened fire injuring 112 and killing 34.
    Local witnesses claim the workers were not charging at the police, but were fleeing from them as teargas was thrown at them by another police detachment. Autopsy reports apparently confirm many were shot in the back.
    How could Ramaphosa exercise such influence over Lonmin’s executive board to be able to effectively bend it, and potentially the board of Xstrata too, to do his bidding? And what truth could the South African government have been so desperate to hide that it was judged better to risk everything and open fire on its own people, rather than let it see the light?
    The answer lies at the heart of the bitter fallacy of the South African commodities boom and the emerging markets paradigm which we have lived in, in the last 15 years. The sad truth is that nothing has changed, or, more accurately, nothing has improved.
    In the past there was one oligarch, Harry Oppenheimer, who controlled Anglo American.
    Today there are five to 10 oligarchs. They are black and they are African. They too oppose apartheid and they too are exporting all of South Africa’s gold and diamonds at the present time. The reason Ramaphosa could ransack Lonmin in the way he has is because he effectively is Lonmin.
    Lonmin exists in many ways to serve his interests and its foreign shareholders would do well to understand this. The whole debate about nationalisation is therefore completely moot. South Africa’s mines have already been nationalised and given over to a ruthless tyranny, signed, sealed and delivered by the many cheerleaders of the ANC overseas.
     
  2. Kiranga

    Kiranga JF-Expert Member

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    If this assertion is correct -- and there is much to be skeptical about, from the implausibility of Lonmin risking so much for Ramaphosa to Ramaphosa's having those kind of balls of steel to begin with-- I believe it hasn't been sufficiently covered in detail.

    I knew there were private interests figuring here, and particularly those belonging to a certain Mr. Ramaphosa, but never did I imagine he had this much of a cabal.

    I hear Amb. Mpungwe was doing quite well for himself - not as a Ramaphosa of course, but our own localized version if you get my drift- and you could certainly expect a myriad of the same in the eventuality, slim as it may seem, of a Lowassa or Membe presidency.
     
  3. Mwana Mpotevu

    Mwana Mpotevu Platinum Member

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    Balozi Ammy Mpungwe. hana tofauti kabisa
     
  4. The Boss

    The Boss JF-Expert Member

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    At one time Mandela thought Ramaphosa could have been a better President than Mbeki
    i wonder what Mandela think now....with all of this...
     
  5. Kiranga

    Kiranga JF-Expert Member

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    Aaah, you took the name out of my mouth.

    I meant Amb. Mpungwe, not Mdee.
     
  6. F

    FJM JF-Expert Member

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    Ni marafiki pia!

    Tanzanite One ni majonzi matupu kwa Tanzania. Hard to believe kuna 'mwanakwetu!
     
  7. Mwana Mpotevu

    Mwana Mpotevu Platinum Member

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    For the time being he is too old to think into that capacity.
     
  8. Kiranga

    Kiranga JF-Expert Member

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    Mandela is a complicit toy poodle if anything. Largely responsible for not properly even registering his position on how meaningless the post apartheid era turned out to be.

    At least with Nyerere you knew where he stood on the NBC privatization and Mwinyi slacking towards enforcing the rule of law, corruption and his pet project, the union.

    Mandela was too busy cashing on his 28 year impisonment celebrity to even be the eldery statesman. Almost resigned before the time, and no one can argue that doesn't have anything to do with the ANC losing the moral compass.
     
  9. Mwana Mpotevu

    Mwana Mpotevu Platinum Member

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    Mpungwe atakuwa amefundishwa na Ramaphosa, na siamini kama kweli Ramaphosa hana hisa hata 1% Tanzanite one! hainiingii akilini. Huyo jamaa ananunua nyati mmoja kwa Tsh1.6billion???????
     
  10. Kiranga

    Kiranga JF-Expert Member

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    Ndani ya wapi hiyo mkuu?

    Naweza kukodi machizi watafute Nyati kama 100 hivi tupumzike kihesabu!

    Sheeeeeeesh.
     
  11. F

    FJM JF-Expert Member

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    Anazo! na wenziwe wa ANC pia.

    Huo mdundiko unondelea sasa hivi huko Marikana hauna tofauti na mgomo wetu wa mafuta. Ni matokeo ya vyama vya siasa kujigeuza machinga. Uncle Cyil ni pazia, ANC ni wahuni kuliko Lucifer.
     
  12. Companero

    Companero Platinum Member

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    "It is our turn to eat"
     
  13. J

    Jasusi JF-Expert Member

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    It is a shame!
     
  14. M

    Msela jela Member

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    Anc ni tatizo sana!
     
  15. Azipa

    Azipa JF-Expert Member

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  16. Kibanga Ampiga Mkoloni

    Kibanga Ampiga Mkoloni JF-Expert Member

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    Hhaah,
    Eating your Brothers and Sisters.
    Bora ya WAKOLONI na huko Bora ya APATHEIDS
     
  17. Kibanga Ampiga Mkoloni

    Kibanga Ampiga Mkoloni JF-Expert Member

    #17
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    Cyril Ramaphosa

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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    Matamela Cyril Ramaphosa (born 17 November 1952) is a South African lawyer, trade union leader, activist, politician and businessman. He was born in Soweto, Gauteng province. While Ramaphosa was previously a major figure in South African national politics, he has in recent years become a prominent figure in the business community.
    Widely respected as a skilful and formidable negotiator and strategist, Ramaphosa is best known for building up the biggest and most powerful trade union in South Africa - the National Union of Mineworkers (NUM) - as well as for the crucial role he played, with Roelf Meyer of the National Party, during the negotiations to bring about a peaceful end to apartheid and steer the country towards its first democratic elections in April 1994.
    In recent times he has been criticised however for his business interests - including a seat on the board of Lonmin - causing him to betray people he used to represent. On 15 August 2012 he called for action against striking platinum miners engaged in 'dastardly criminal' conduct.[SUP][1][/SUP]
    He is married to Dr. Tshepo Motsepe and he has four children (two with his current wife).
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    [edit] Early life and education

    Although he spent most of his childhood in Soweto, he matriculated at Mphaphuli High School in Sibasa, Venda, in 1971. He subsequently registered to study law at the University of the North (Turfloop) in 1972.
    While at university, Ramaphosa became involved in student politics and joined the South African Students Organisation (SASO), and the Black People's Convention (BPC). This resulted in him being detained in solitary confinement for eleven months in 1974 under Section 6 of the Terrorism act, for organising pro-Frelimo rallies. In 1976 he was detained for a second time, and held for six months. After his release, he became a law clerk for a Johannesburg firm of attorneys and continued his studies through the University of South Africa (UNISA), where he obtained his B. Proc. Degree in 1981.
    [edit] Political activist and trade union leader

    After obtaining his degree, Ramaphosa joined the National Council of Trade Unions (NCTU) as a legal advisor. In 1982, CUSA requested that Ramaphosa start a union for mineworkers; this new union was launched in the same year and was named the National Union of Mineworkers (NUM). Ramaphosa was arrested in Lebowa, on the charge of organising or planning to take part in a meeting in Namakgale which was banned by the local magistrate.
    Ramaphosa was elected as the first General Secretary of the union, a position he held until he resigned in June 1991, following his election as Secretary General of the African National Congress (ANC). Under his leadership, union membership grew from 6,000 in 1982 to 300,000 in 1992, giving it control of nearly half of the total black workforce in the South African mining industry. As General Secretary, he James Motlatsi (President of NUM) and Elijah Barayi (Vice President of NUM) also led the mineworkers in one of the biggest strikes ever in South African history.
    In 1985, the NUM broke away from CUSA and helped to establish the Congress of South African Trade Unions (COSATU). When COSATU joined forces with the United Democratic Front (UDF) political movement against the National Party government of P. W. Botha, Ramaphosa took a leading role in what became known as the Mass Democratic Movement (MDM).
    When Nelson Mandela was released from prison, Ramaphosa was on the National Reception Committee.
    [edit] Politician

    Subsequent to his election as Secretary General of the African National Congress in 1991, he became head of the negotiation team of the ANC in negotiating the end of apartheid with the National Party government. Following the first fully democratic elections in 1994, Ramaphosa became a member of parliament; he was elected the chairperson of its Constitutional Assembly on 24 May 1994 and played a central role in the government of national unity.
    After he lost the race to become President of South Africa to Thabo Mbeki, he resigned from his political positions in January 1997 and moved to the private sector, where he became a director of New Africa Investments Limited. He came in first place in the 1997 election to the ANC's National Executive Committee.[SUP][2][/SUP]
    While not a member of the South African Communist Party (SACP), Ramaphosa has claimed that he is a committed socialist.
    The media continually speculated on Ramaphosa joining the race for the presidency of the ANC in 2007, before the 2009 South African presidential election. [2] However, he has stated that he is not interested in the presidency. On 2 September 2007, The Sunday Times reported that Ramaphosa was in the election race, but by that evening he had released a statement once again holding back on any commitment. [3]
    In December 2007, he was again elected to the ANC National Executive Committee, this time in 30th place with 1,910 votes.[SUP][2][/SUP]
    On May 20, 2012, prominent Afrikaner ANC member Derek Hanekom asked Ramaphosa to run for President of the ANC, stating that "We need leaders of comrade Cyril's calibre. I know Cyril is very good at business, but I really wish he would put all his money in a trust and step up for a higher and more senior position". Although it is unknown whether or not Ramaphosa will run for President of the ANC, he attempted to quiet the speculation by responding to Hanekom's comment by stating "You can't read anything [into what he said]. He was joking".
    [edit] Businessman

    Among other positions, he is executive chairman of Shanduka Group, a company he founded. Shanduka Group has investments in the Resources Sector, Energy Sector, Real Estate, Banking, Insurance, and Telecoms (SEACOM). He is also chairman of The Bidvest Group Limited, and MTN. His other non-executive directorships include Macsteel Holdings, Alexander Forbes, Standard Bank and SABMiller. In March 2007 he was appointed Non-Executive joint Chairman of Mondi, a leading international paper and packaging group, when the company demerged from Anglo American plc.
    [edit] Controversy

    Main article: Marikana miners' strike
    The Marikana Massacre[SUP][3][/SUP], as referred to in the media, occurred when police broke up an occupation by striking Lonmin workers of a 'koppie' (hiltop) near Nkaneng shack settlement in Marikana on Thursday, 16 August 2012. As a result of the police shootings, 34 miners died and an additional 78 miners were injured causing anger and outcry against the police and South African government. Further controversy emerged after it was discovered that most of the victims were shot in the back[SUP][4][/SUP] and many victims were shot far from police lines.[SUP][5][/SUP] The violence on August 16, 2012 was the single most lethal use of force by South African security forces against civilians since the end of the apartheid era.[SUP][6][/SUP]
    During the Marikana Commission, it also emerged that Lonmin management solicited Lonmin shareholder and ANC heavyweight, Cyril Ramaphosa, to coordinate "concomitant action" against "criminal" protesters and is seen by many as therefore being responsible for the massacre.[SUP][7][/SUP][SUP][8][/SUP]
    [edit] Honorary doctorates and awards

    Among others, Ramaphosa has received honorary doctorates from the University of Natal, the University of Port Elizabeth, the University of Cape Town, the University of the North, the National University of Lesotho, the University of Massachusetts Amherst and the University of Pennsylvania. In October 1991, he was a visiting Professor of Law at Stanford University.
    Ramaphosa received the Olof Palme prize in Stockholm in October 1987.
    In 2004, he was voted 34th in the Top 100 Great South Africans.
    Ramaphosa was included in the 2007 Time 100 [4], an annual list of 100 men and women whose power, talent or moral example is transforming the world.
    [edit] International positions

    In his role as a businessman, Ramaphosa is a member of the Coca-Cola Company International Advisory Board as well as the Unilever Africa Advisory Council. He was also the first deputy chairman of the Commonwealth Business Council.
    Along with the ex-president of Finland, Martti Ahtisaari, he was appointed an inspector of the Irish Republican Army weapons dumps in Northern Ireland. Ramaphosa is the Honorary Consul General for Iceland in Johannesburg, South Africa.
    In the 2007–2008 Kenyan crisis, which followed the disputed re-election of President Mwai Kibaki in December 2007, Ramaphosa was unanimously chosen by the mediation team headed by Kofi Annan to be the chief mediator in charge of leading long-term talks; however, Kibaki's government expressed dissatisfaction with the choice of Ramaphosa, saying that he had business links with Kibaki's opponent Raila Odinga, and on 4 February Annan accepted Ramaphosa's withdrawal from the role of chief mediator.[SUP][9][/SUP] According to Ramaphosa, Odinga had visited him in 2007, but he did not have any "special interest" that would lead him to favor one side or the other;[SUP][10][/SUP] however, he said that he could not be an effective mediator without "the trust and confidence of all parties" and that he therefore felt it would be best for him to return to South Africa to avoid becoming an obstacle in the negotiation process.[SUP][11][/SUP]
     
  18. Ben Saanane

    Ben Saanane Verified User

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    Terrible mistake .....
     
  19. Mwana Mpotevu

    Mwana Mpotevu Platinum Member

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    Mkuu, ali-bid kule Afrika Kusini katika mnada wa kuuza nyati lakini akazidiwa dau na katoto kamoja kana miaka 28 kakamnunua nyati huyo kwa Rand milioni 20 wakati dau la mwisho la Ramaphosa lilikuwa Rand 18 milion.

    Huyu Ramaphosa sasa anatuhumiwa kuchochea polisi kuua waandamanaji Marikana ameshtakiwa mbele ya Tume iliyoundwa. Ngoja tusikie.
     
  20. Kibanga Ampiga Mkoloni

    Kibanga Ampiga Mkoloni JF-Expert Member

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    Kaka mbona kuna sehemu nimesoma, bado hilo wazo lipo mpaka leo? kuna uwezekano akamrithi ZUMA.
     
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