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Comparative Analysis - East African National Budgets 2012

Discussion in 'International Forum' started by Delta4, Jun 7, 2012.

  1. Delta4

    Delta4 Senior Member

    #1
    Jun 7, 2012
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    [TABLE]
    [TR]
    [TD]Country
    [/TD]
    [TD]
    [/TD]
    [TD="align: center"]2012 Budget
    [/TD]
    [TD="align: center"]Pop. 2009
    [/TD]
    [TD="align: center"]% Kenya’s Budget
    [/TD]
    [TD="align: center"]Donor –factor
    [/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD="align: center"]Rwanda
    [/TD]
    [TD="align: center"]
    [/TD]
    [TD="align: center"]USD 1.8 Billion
    [/TD]
    [TD="align: center"]10.5M
    [/TD]
    [TD="align: center"]13.47%
    [/TD]
    [TD="align: center"]32.37%
    [/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD="align: center"]Uganda
    [/TD]
    [TD="align: center"]
    [/TD]
    [TD="align: center"]USD 4.1 Billion
    [/TD]
    [TD="align: center"]32.4M
    [/TD]
    [TD="align: center"]30.00%
    [/TD]
    [TD="align: center"]29.60%
    [/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD="align: center"]
    Tanzania
    [/TD]
    [TD="align: center"]
    [/TD]
    [TD="align: center"]USD 8.1 Billion
    [/TD]
    [TD="align: center"]41.1M
    [/TD]
    [TD="align: center"]61.85%
    [/TD]
    [TD="align: center"]33.1%
    [/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD="align: center"]Kenya
    [/TD]
    [TD="align: center"]
    [/TD]
    [TD="align: center"]USD.13.2 Billion
    [/TD]
    [TD="align: center"]39M
    [/TD]
    [TD="align: center"]0%
    [/TD]
    [TD="align: center"]8.7%
    [/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD="align: center"]Ethiopia
    [/TD]
    [TD="align: center"]
    [/TD]
    [TD="align: center"]USD,6.954Billion
    [/TD]
    [TD="align: center"]83M
    [/TD]
    [TD="align: center"]52.68%
    [/TD]
    [TD="align: center"]33%
    [/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD="align: center"]Nairobi city
    [/TD]
    [TD="align: center"]
    [/TD]
    [TD="align: center"]USD185 Million
    [/TD]
    [TD="align: center"]2.5 M
    [/TD]
    [TD="align: center"]n/a
    [/TD]
    [TD="align: center"]n/a
    [/TD]
    [/TR]
    [/TABLE]


    East African National Defense spending 2011, including Ethiopia, I will post kidogo later on.

    Haya, twende kazi!!
     
  2. Kabaridi

    Kabaridi JF-Expert Member

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    Jun 7, 2012
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    Significantly lovely............................ Kenya's donor factor is the least. But have a question Delta4. If that donor factor is less, means that domestic borrowing is on the rise and there is no inflows that can give such borrowing leverage. Can there be a way kenyan donor factor can be raised to levels of 29%. It would help. Worldbank also says that the Ethiopian Economy outpaced kenya's as the largest in east and central Africa. Based on Ethiopias spending something dosen't add up really.
     
  3. Delta4

    Delta4 Senior Member

    #3
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    One: a deliberate ‘'face-Eastwards'' policy and combined with ‘'out-of-the-box'' imaginative GoK financing options beyond the age-old matrix of "Donor-support'' in public debt financing (domestic borrowing, sovereign bonds, etc), finally have broken Western stranglehold on GoK. Multiplier effect. Eventually even the funds- component from International Funding Agencies (World Bank, IMF) have become voluntary and not prescriptive, nor pegged to their usual economic programs which have had such negative effects on African Economies. Bi-lateral funding no longer attaches the usual big-brother arrogance since these funds are never factored in Kenya's Budgetary Statements. Numerous African Governments' economists and planners have studied and replicated to varying degrees this Kenyan Matrix, and so caused substantial worry to the usual hegemonistic West.

    Two: Ethiopian outpaced Kenya in the growth-rate quantum (10% against 5.5% or thereabouts). But that must be seen against the other indicators, a simple one is the comparative chart above - the Economies and Populations for instances are as indicated.

    And because the central cog in the Eastern African economic (and socio-politico) dynamics appears clearly to be Kenya, there are deliberate insidious efforts by certain of our Western ''Friends'' to slow down Kenya's movement and force /bargain their re-engagement in Kenya. Wtz will take their usual exceptions about this statement, no doubt!!
     
  4. M

    Mwembetayari JF-Expert Member

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    Therein lies the problem that many here have been pointing out for months!
     
  5. Kabaridi

    Kabaridi JF-Expert Member

    #5
    Jun 8, 2012
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    QUOTE=Delta4;4009809]Numerous African Governments' economists and planners have studied and replicated to varying degrees this Kenyan Matrix, and so caused substantial worry to the usual hegemonistic West.

    Two: Ethiopian outpaced Kenya in the growth-rate quantum (10% against 5.5% or thereabouts). But that must be seen against the other indicators, a simple one is the comparative chart above - the Economies and Populations for instances are as indicated.

    [/QUOTE]

    In view of other indicators, there are candid efforts by the hegemonic "Bretton-Woods" to significantly slow down Kenya's advancement. But that does not obscure years of steady economic growth witnessed, which can be attributed to expansions in tourism, telecommunications, transport, construction and a recovery in agriculture. Ethiopia's growth-rate quantam is impressive but is not significantly attributed from other possible indicators/for instance a steady middle-class that drives the economy. The poorest way to re-engage by our hypocritical brettonwoods would be to react with all daggers drawn. We can however take lessons from downsouth/Mugabe/Zimbabwe, with the miracoluos recovery from an almost economic surbotage. They have also realized that they cannot be pegged any more to their economic programs/rigid policies/aid requirements to facilitate the growth of African Economies. ANF, they have to worry because there are so many countries emerging from south America economically and not forgetting the Asian tigers.

    Out of the myriad of factors and most visible that would seek to slow down kenya's growth, would be;
    1.The foundations of economic freedom are fragile and uneven across the country.
    2.Poor protection of property rights and widespread corruption discourage entrepreneurial activity.
    3.The rule of law is weak, and local courts are subject to substantial political interference.
    3. After several years of strong economic growth, Kenya's economic performance has deteriorated, partly because of the global economic slowdown and also because of the generally slow pace of efforts to improve regulatory efficiency and open markets to international trade and investment.
    4.Reforms in public finance management have continued, but progress has been sluggish.
    5.The trade weighted average tariff rate is quite high at 9.2 percent, and myriad non-tariff barriers further constrain freedom to trade.
    6.The poor investment regime lacks efficiency and transparency, discouraging investment activity.
    7.The financial sector remains vulnerable to government influence and inadequate supervision.
    8.And political instabilty/PEV(which in face of the kenyan scenario has now become and will always be an adage)"

    Those are just a dose of factors that simply put the economy on a path of decline. The only critical factor that may slow Kenya's economic growth is Europe's fiscal austerity measures that are weakening bilateral-trading power between kenya and its long term trading partner and destination for its exports. But this problem you would think is already solved. Uganda has increased trading with kenya and is the biggest trading partner. With such bilateral relations increasing within the EAC, the declaration of countries like Ethiopia as fourth economy in sub-sahara, would just remain a symbolic juxtapositioning. And with such increase in EAC bilateral trade, the actions of countries within EA pegged on obstructionism, would be unpalpabe. Off-course, factors like famine are no where near as critical factors to steadily decline the economy.

    Kenya's economic freedom score is 57.5, making its economy the 103rd freest in the 2012 Index. Its score is virtually unchanged from last year, with gains in monetary freedom and the control of government spending offset by a significant loss of trade freedom. Kenya is ranked 13th out of 46 countries in the Sub-Saharan Africa region, and its overall score is below the world average. And if freedom score is constant and being 13th in the region/subsaharan, that is not bad if measuring indicators are within the sub-saharan region.
     
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