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Cia terrorism

Discussion in 'International Forum' started by Ami, May 14, 2011.

  1. Ami

    Ami JF-Expert Member

    #1
    May 14, 2011
    Joined: Apr 29, 2010
    Messages: 1,858
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    Mara nyingi imeelezwa kuwa America huwa inajifanyia ugaidi yenyewe na kuwafanyia wengine bila hofu wala huruma ili kupata visingizio vya kutimiza malengo yao.
    Anza kusoma hii hapa chini.

    With the 2004 electoral clock ticking amid growing public concern about U.S. casualties and chaos in Iraq, the Bush administration’s hawks are upping the ante militarily. To those familiar with the CIA’s Phoenix assassination program in Vietnam, Latin America’s death squads or Israel’s official policy of targeted murders of Palestinian activists, the results are likely to look chillingly familiar.
    The Prospect has learned that part of a secret $3 billion in new funds—tucked away in the $87 billion Iraq appropriation that Congress approved in early November—will go toward the creation of a paramilitary unit manned by militiamen associated with former Iraqi exile groups. Experts say it could lead to a wave of extrajudicial killings, not only of armed rebels but of nationalists, other opponents of the U.S. occupation and thousands of civilian Baathists (emphasis added)—up to 120,000 of the estimated 2.5 million former Baath Party members in Iraq.
    “They’re clearly cooking up joint teams to do Phoenix-like things, like they did in Vietnam,” says Vincent Cannistraro, former CIA chief of counter terrorism. Ironically, he says, the U.S. forces in Iraq are working with key members of Saddam Hussein’s now-defunct intelligence agency to set the program in motion. “They’re setting up little teams of Seals and Special Forces with teams of Iraqis, working with people who were former senior Iraqi intelligence people, to do these things,” Cannistraro says."
    Phoenix Rising January 1, 2004
     
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